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  1. #1
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    Winter riding clothing

    Share some of your tips for staying warm and dry in the cold.

    What are the best layers without getting too bulky? Brands and models?

    Gloves are always a problem for me. What do you recommend.

    fc

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    Pearl Izumi arm and leg warmer.

    For turkey ride, planning to wear those, along with winter pants. Contemplating full face helmet, just to stay warm.

    Dude it is going to be in the high 20s when we start.

  3. #3
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    Although I don't ride in the Sierras in the winter, I ride in the early morning during the winter, rain or shine.

    I use the Specialized Radiant gloves when I'm riding in the early morning. They were given to me as a gift and I was skeptical when I first saw them. At first I felt as though they were too bulky and hindered movement, but now I either got used to them or broke them in and they keep my hands nice and toasty.
    http://salemcycle.com/product/specia...es-30095-1.htm

    I wear the usual shorts and jersey. On top of that I wear a 100% nylon stow-able jacket and full leg warmers. Protect your knees! If its below 35 degrees I'll also wear a skull cap to keep my ears warm.

    The only problem I have with this setup is that my toes sometimes get really cold. Any suggestions on winter socks?

  4. #4
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    Irredeon windproof tights, wool socks,long sleeve jersey, lightweight wind proof breathable XC ski shell [ REI Momentum], insulated full finger gloves and a beanie under the helmet
    Warning: Consumption of alcohol may make you think the person on the barstool next to you is attractive

  5. #5
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    A lot of what has been stated above: At 35 degrees or under it's.....
    >skull cap
    >Goretex Jacket: A great wind block & it has lots of zippers to cool you as you warm
    >Craft base layer under jersey
    >Pearl Izumi leg and arm warmers
    >Smart wool socks with Goretex over socks if it is wet or really cold to keep toes warm.
    >Specialized long gloves
    >A nice heavy IPA with friends to finish the ride.

    "Don't Touch MY Junk"

  6. #6
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    Yesterday checked out a Bontrager Bib Tight and it was comfortable and warm. My friend from the shop swears by them. Will be on my X-mas list.

  7. #7
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    along with variations of the above mentioned items..

    On really cold days, I Saran Wrap my my feet before (after socks, before shoes go on). One layer is just enough to block the wind.

    There ya go, your redneck tip of the day.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    Gloves are always a problem for me. What do you recommend.
    fc
    I was given some Spenco gloves as a gift a couple of years ago and have been very happy with them.

    http://shop.spencocycling.com/p-21-cold-snap.aspx

    I usually use some Pearl Izumi AmFib tights and whatever jacket is handy. Gloves and socks/shoe covers are the most important to me.

    -Derek

  9. #9
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    I just use many layers and make sure the top layer cuts the wind and/or keeps me dry.

    one thing I've struggled with for years is my hands. Until last year, I was not able to find any gloves that 1) kept my hands/fingers toasty 2) kept my hands dry.

    Growing up in Canada - I always had Thinsulate gloves. so last year I got these cheap Thinsulate lined gloves and they are AWESOME! I did a night ride last night in 30 degree weather and they kept my hands nice and warm.

    Check them out..only $15 and they beat the hell out of any of those overpriced riding gloves out there: http://www.palmflex.com/majestic-215...roof-pair.html

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by derek
    I was given some Spenco gloves as a gift a couple of years ago and have been very happy with them.

    http://shop.spencocycling.com/p-21-cold-snap.aspx

    I usually use some Pearl Izumi AmFib tights and whatever jacket is handy. Gloves and socks/shoe covers are the most important to me.

    -Derek
    Got to have the shoe covers!!! Even the roadie ones that only cover the first half of the shoe are at least something. Mtb shoes are full of holes.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  11. #11
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    Craft base layers are great for keeping you warm, but still breathing on the climbs.

    When its really cold, I use a wool liner under my heavy gloves.

  12. #12
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    highly recommended items:

    long sleeve wool baselayers!

    hincapie socks! these are thicker in the toe area for extra warmth. it works!

    endura mt500 rain jacket.

    underarmour balaclava.
    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
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  13. #13
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    Underarmor Cold Weather long sleeve turtle neck is the shyznit

  14. #14
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    I think the most important thing to consider when dressing for riding in the cold is the baselayer. I tried the Under Armor style material but it always felt clammy and cold when I would stop for a while. I wanted to try wool, but the high price kept me from going that route until I found a deal on Terramar Merino wool baselayers at Campmor. These are a thin weight without bulk. I find it warms even when loaded with sweat, does not retain stink like synthetics, and since it is a thin material it works really well underneath cycling tights. It is soft enough to not cause any chafing in the "undercarriage" area.

    Baselayer pants

    Baselayer top

    For the really cold days the gloves I have are some waterproof ski/snowboard gloves that I found in a bargain bin someplace. These things have gauntlets that are pretty long, with a bungie cinch at the wrist as well as at the end of the gauntlet. They came with liner gloves as well.

    I never had to resort to shoe covers or plastic, as my feet don't ever get that cold, but I do use a merino wool sock by Columbia. They are not too bulky so they fit comfortably in my cycling shoes and dont bulk under the tights.

  15. #15
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    Some of my favorite cold-weather clothes;

    Ibex wool knickers, bib and no-bib
    Swobo Fenster wool knickers
    thin wool undershirts from Woolistic and some xc skiing company I found on ebay
    Craft undershirt with a wind-proof front
    Endura winter gloves (British)
    (any neoprene glove)
    Pearl Izumi's most ridiculously warm gloves for coldest, wettest days
    Sealskinz waterproof socks for rainy, cold days
    Gator neoprene overshoes
    SIDI insulated boots
    Woolistic "Sputnik" wool skull cap
    Voler's heavy foam vests and jackets for really cold weather
    a super-light wind vest that wads up into nothing from Hincapie
    rain jackets; gore-tex from Northface (hope I don't crash in that one), some breathable, semi-clear one from Dainese and the super-cheap, plastic clear one that's < $20, this time from Fox but they don't last long
    rain pants from REI

    I commute all year on my bike, often in the dark, I like to ride mountain bikes on night rides, all year round, and I like to race cyclocross in the fall/winter. The stuff above works for me.

    Another trick; on really cold, long rides, bring extra, dry versions in your pack. At a stop, replace those wet socks, caps, undershirts with dry versions. You will be warm and your friends will be envious.

    In a pinch, grocery bags over your socks and ideally some sort of tape on your shins will get you through bad weather.

    The Sealskinz socks are amazing for cold, wet rides.

    Morgan

  16. #16
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    I like the Helly Hansen base layers with a combo of polypro and merino. You can find them on sale at Sports Basement.
    For gloves last year I found these at REI: http://www.rei.com/product/766532
    and if it is really cold I'll use this liner as well: http://www.rei.com/product/661608. The combo is not to bulky either.

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  18. #18
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    My best tip- If you don't feel a little chilly when you roll out, then you have too many layers and you'll end up a sweaty mess.

  19. #19
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    +1 on the sealskinz

  20. #20
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    Something that hasn't been mentioned yet is glasses. I tear up a ton during the winter and it is annoying!!! You want glasses that are:

    - light or clear for the low light or night ride conditions
    - vent very well because they fog up so easy this time of year.
    - get the wind out of your eyes. One where the glass rests on your cheeks comfortably is good
    - something with big flexy arms is good since they can go on top of your headband or skull cap.

    Often neglected but important! Even more important for road riding

    On that note, I found one that works for me perfectly. I'm so jazzed!!!

    https://reviews.mtbr.com/blog/uvex-crow-pro-review/

    <img src="https://reviews.mtbr.com/files/2010/01/crow-pro_8816.jpg">



    Also, protect your skin, specially your face from the wind and cold. I use a Kiehls ski product. But the Okole stuff or Aquaphor works well too.


    And finally, full face helmet if the ride suits it.

    fc
    Last edited by fc; 11-24-2010 at 11:13 AM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairylegs
    My best tip- If you don't feel a little chilly when you roll out, then you have too many layers and you'll end up a sweaty mess.

    Yes, yes!!! You will get progressively warmer. Except for your hands... which is the opposite.

    fc

  22. #22
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher
    Some of my favorite cold-weather clothes;

    ...

    Morgan
    Golden advice!!

  23. #23
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    Rule 5 keeps me warm.
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  24. #24
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    From a non wool wearer:
    Diadora Chili Extreme mountain bike shoes. Superb! Waterproof and insulated. Good down to 15 degrees no problem.
    Thick pair of insulated socks, Pearl Izumi or Cannondale make great non woolies.
    Insulated cycling pants from Cannondale for very cold. Insulated knickers by Biemme for 30-45 degrees. Rubberized knickers by Endura for 40-55 degrees. Regular Pearl Izumi knickers for 50-65 degrees.
    REI or similar zippered insulating shirt. Long sleeve jersey. Fleece vest if it's real cold. Light shell if it's cool, good waterproof jacket if it's cold. I like my Shower's Pass jacket for when it's really cold.
    Pearl Izumi or Performance long finger winter gloves. Be careful with Performance gloves, most of them are designed for roadies and have a seam where it should not be for gripping a mountain bar. Fox also makes some great neoprene winter gloves. I like these a lot but boy do they stink!
    Pearl Izumi skull cap for when it's cool or Cannondale fleece cap for when it's cold.

    Uber incliment weather:
    Shower's Pass makes a great pair of waterproof pants for cycling. They keep you warm! They are bulky and I used them for commuting in the rain and snow only, not for training rides.
    Balaklava for when it's below 30 degrees is great. My chin and neck get cold otherwise.

    I've trained and commuted in all kinds of weather, 34 degrees and raining, 20 degrees and dry. I've managed to stay comfortable in all conditions.

    The other critical part is to estimate how much heat you are going to produce and dress for that. I have made mistakes when I did this, but failed to estimate how slow I would be going because I was riding with someone slower. This get's me too cold every time.
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  25. #25
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    Favorite Base Layer

    From Mountain Equipment Co-op in Canada:

    MEC Midweight Turtleneck, Poly and spandex, wicking layer. $39.

    It's my winter num-num!

  26. #26
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    "The Sealskinz socks are amazing for cold, wet rides."

    Morgan

    How bulky are these?I'm thinking about fit in shoe issues,they sound wonderful for us ladies with perpetual cold feet.

  27. #27
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    Francis

    Quote Originally Posted by mtrh8
    "The Sealskinz socks are amazing for cold, wet rides."

    Morgan

    How bulky are these?I'm thinking about fit in shoe issues,they sound wonderful for us ladies with perpetual cold feet.
    They are very thin. I wear them over thin wool cycling socks inside my regular SIDIs, and my SIDIs fit almost the same with them as without them. It's basically a much higher-tech, more comfortable and better tailored version of the produce-bag-over-the-sock-with-tape trick.

    Just don't let them go through the dryer.

    Morgan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan G.
    I'm making Mexican Coffee for the Appetite Seminar tomorrow morning! Bringing a thermos.

    Morgan

  29. #29
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    I tried something new this morning...a racing socks (balaclava) from the go-kart race track in burlingame...worked pretty well.

  30. #30
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    Winter bike shoes

    All good suggestions but I am surprised no one says winter bike shoes. They make huge difference. I notice that when I ride in the cold it is key to suit up quick and get riding. Shoe covers work ok but take more time are and don' work well in the rain. I use lake kashmir and got them on bay cheap. Also just like skiing have your shoes warm store them inside. I also put my clothes on passenger seat and put the seat heater on. Finally I use the car temp gauge below 60, below 50 i have different clothes i wear. It's a bit funny we talk about winter here compared to the Midwest.

  31. #31
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    Winter cycling clothing for the Bay Area: the same stuff you would wear in the summer, plus a rain cape and maybe a cap under your helmet if it's really cold.

    Winter cycling clothing for Michigan is another story:

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/HVUsuQJFgeWiLSQ03cGQJQ?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh4.ggpht.com/_Z0Y--IZhGEc/TPAl04x0z3I/AAAAAAAABjE/2N4E992i-aU/s640/IMG_1866.JPG" height="640" width="480" /></a>

  32. #32
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    Today, on a balmy stash ride, after yesterdays 40deg. ride in Aptos. where avg temps were in the 50's, I kitted with UA heatgear ls over a swobo ls with an Ibex softshell vest. Nema knickers, thick thorlo socks, and performance $20 one season neo toe warmers.
    yesterday at the 40 deg start, I added neo gloves and a UA coldgear LS. I use buff doo-rags 4 seasons and pull them over my cold injured ear tips, since they are really affected by cooler temps.
    Earn your turns. )'(

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bokchoicowboy
    I think the most important thing to consider when dressing for riding in the cold is the baselayer. I tried the Under Armor style material but it always felt clammy and cold when I would stop for a while. I wanted to try wool, but the high price kept me from going that route until I found a deal on Terramar Merino wool baselayers at Campmor. These are a thin weight without bulk. I find it warms even when loaded with sweat, does not retain stink like synthetics, and since it is a thin material it works really well underneath cycling tights. It is soft enough to not cause any chafing in the "undercarriage" area.

    Baselayer pants

    Baselayer top

    For the really cold days the gloves I have are some waterproof ski/snowboard gloves that I found in a bargain bin someplace. These things have gauntlets that are pretty long, with a bungie cinch at the wrist as well as at the end of the gauntlet. They came with liner gloves as well.

    I never had to resort to shoe covers or plastic, as my feet don't ever get that cold, but I do use a merino wool sock by Columbia. They are not too bulky so they fit comfortably in my cycling shoes and dont bulk under the tights.

    check it,

    the cool clamminess of UA is the evaporative conduction, if you vent properly, in 15 minutes it'll be dryish warm. avoiding saturation is key. UA will transport transpiration and persperation to your outer mid layers very well.
    Earn your turns. )'(

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sftrail
    All good suggestions but I am surprised no one says winter bike shoes. They make huge difference.
    .
    I switch my shoes:

    Summer


    Winter


    as you can see there's fewer holes in the winter pair

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by sftrail
    All good suggestions but I am surprised no one says winter bike shoes. They make huge difference. I notice that when I ride in the cold it is key to suit up quick and get riding. Shoe covers work ok but take more time are and don' work well in the rain. I use lake kashmir and got them on bay cheap. Also just like skiing have your shoes warm store them inside. I also put my clothes on passenger seat and put the seat heater on. Finally I use the car temp gauge below 60, below 50 i have different clothes i wear. It's a bit funny we talk about winter here compared to the Midwest.
    Actually, I mentioned them above:
    "Diadora Chili Extreme mountain bike shoes. Superb! Waterproof and insulated. Good down to 15 degrees no problem."

    I did some heavy researching to find these things. I had a pair of old Sidi winter shoes and they had NO insulation. They sucked! I understand the new ones have some insulation and are good. I have had really great results with the Diadora Chili Extreme's. Ridden in lots of rain and snow, I love them. I got them off of Ebay, new, cheap.
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  36. #36
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    My Brother and I did a night ride Thanksgiving night @ Folsom Nimbus Lake. Temp was 39 degrees. This is his back yard so he had it dialed. One tip he showed me was to use latex gloves inside our regular summer gloves. I was skeptical at first but half mile in and I was ready to give it a try. Once I put the latex on we rode for two hours and my hands where toasty warm. The latex acts like a wind breaker.

    Ben
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  37. #37
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    One thing I learned back in my mountaineering days: its better to start off a bit cold and then warm up than to start off warm and toasty, get hot & sweaty, and then freeze because your clothes are soaked.

    Here in the Bay Area I've never added anything more than arm and leg warmers, full finger gloves, and a windbreaker . Usually the windbreaker stays off until its downhill time. I warm up pretty quickly though, so even when its really cold I'm fine after 10 mins or so.
    Sitting on a cornflake, waiting for the van to come

  38. #38
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    frosty turkeys

    woke up this morning to the third frost in four days, with one day of bucketing rain in between frosts. here's what i wear when it gets around freezing. this:

    http://www.swobo.com/catalog/product...d=1349&error=1

    plus this:

    http://www.swobo.com/catalog/product...d=1106&error=1

    plus this:

    http://www.swobo.com/catalog/product...d=1348&error=1

    if it's raining, i swap out the full-on merino for a 753 blend jersey, and throw an endura flyte rainjacket on over the top. thick wool socks, plastic bags if it's gonna be a soaker. buff under helmet if it's dry, let the rain come in if it's wet. basically, if it's raining, i know it'll be warmer than if it's clear and cold, so i dress lighter for the rain. wouldn't mind some new toe covers for the shoes when it gets real cold, here in the arctic tundra of santa cruz...
    hold my beer...

  39. #39
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    Wool, the Miracle fabric!

    I have two base layers that have provided amazingly efficient comfort:
    Icebreakers Merino tank top (for 55-80 deg temps) and Smartwool NTS tee shirt (for 25-65 deg temps). They do get wet from perspiration, but they don't get clammy like poly garments. Also, they don't get funky like the polys do either. In fact, my jerseys don't get funky if I'm wearing wool under them. This is one of those miracle fabrics that is absolutely worth the seemingly high price.

    Outside of these, I have a pair of chamoisless PI tights that are windproof on the front, but a bit thinner on the rear. Bought 'em to wear over my bibshorts at the frosty Boggs V and they worked perfectly.

  40. #40
    fc
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    Man, it's so cold.

    Here's a question... how do I keep my nose from running? It's like a drip faucet during cold rides.

    fc

  41. #41
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    Don't Forget !

    Fuzzy Duds
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Winter riding clothing-5211784458_0be2113d6f_b2010.jpg  


  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    Man, it's so cold.

    Here's a question... how do I keep my nose from running? It's like a drip faucet during cold rides.

    fc
    I'm with you there. Within the first 15 or 20 minutes, my nose starts running and continues until we're done, and I'm pretty sure my rockets are being added to the UN's list of WMDs. It doesn't really bother me, but yeah -- it'd be nice to have some way to limit or alleviate that. For now, I'll keep washing my gloves after rides.

  43. #43
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    I ride flat pedals so I dont like using a boot cover and a big bulky winter shoe seems overkill. Overall my feet stay warm enough with good winter socks but my toes would get extremely numb cold.

    I had a pair of 2mm neoprene socks I never used anymore (just too hot), so I cut the toe end off. I run this inside my favorite riding shoe with a good sock and works amazingly well. Ive been using them in mid 40deg temps with great success and hoping to try them on an early am ride in the 30's to see how they really hold up. The Sealskinz do look nice.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Winter riding clothing-warmtoes.jpg  


  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    Share some of your tips for staying warm and dry in the cold.

    What are the best layers without getting too bulky? Brands and models?

    Gloves are always a problem for me. What do you recommend.

    fc
    F.C. lately most days I am out on the road by 4:30am so I am with you on the need to dress for the recent cold (by bay area standards) and I'll acknowledge that my input is antidotal. I'll assume your talking about the mid 30's and this time of year when the temperature range isn't significant during most peoples rides. I gotta assume too, that you are actually posting the question to spur conversation so here are my general take, without getting into brands..

    1. Glove liners -- they can make a huge difference and can easily be stowed if temps rise.
    2. Full coverage glasses - I use prescription w/ transition 2 (they get completely clear yet go dark in the sun)
    3. Thin wide Head band that can slide over your ears+ THIN scull cap if needed.
    4. Long sleeve base layer.
    5. Your layers should all be fitted snuggly - you get way less flushing and more venting that trying to put a waterproof shell on. At leas one layer should be wind barrier. - I'll often have 4 snug layers on my upper body rather than use a baggy jacked (unless it is raining) - baggy is slow ;-)
    6. A vest is really important even if under another layer.
    7. Bibs - end up being warmer when reaching getting stuff out of your pockets etc. it keeps everything were it should be.If your layers roll up a bit you can quickly get squared away without stopping.

    shoe covers, sox etc

    If I was a gravity guy - I might do baggy :-)
    Jt

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  45. #45
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    Maybe some of my tips won't apply to you norcal folks because I don't have humid or wet conditions, but I do ride in temps between 0-20 deg F almost every morning all winter long and have ridden at temps as low as -10 to -15F.

    Upper body: I wear a good polypro or similar base/wicking layer followed by my fleece insulated Castelli long-sleeved jersey down to 25-30 degrees. With temps below that I add a Pearl Izumi Fleece pull over.These both have tall zip-up necks.

    Legs: Sugoi medium weight inuslated tights with my regular Hoss Ponderosa baggies on top. With temps closer to Zero F I'll add a thin polypro full length base layer under the Sugoi tights (Champion brand from Wal-Mart I believe. Like $12)

    Feet: Regular thin cycling socks (wicking layer) with medium weight Lorpen Smart Wool socks (insulating layer) over that, with regular cycling shoes. This works fine down to about 20-25F. I'll add Performance fleece lined neoprene full booties (insulation and barrier) over all that if it's below 20. I add a pair of chemical toe warmers under my toes between sock layers if it's below 15... If it's below 5, I add a second pair on top of my toes.

    One thing to keep in mind about layering under shoes. It doesn't work to just layer up thick socks inside your regular shoes if they are too tight because that cuts off the circulation to the feet. No circulation = No heat. So it's ok to wear regular shoes, just have some that are roomy enough for extra sock layers.

    Another thing that helps with the feet is to cut out a piece of neoprene from some old toe booties and place under the insole right over the cleat to help keep the cleat from sucking all the heat out of your feet and to make that hole a bit more water resistant. Or replace the regular insole with a thicker felt insole. Again, make sure there's enough room for circulation.

    Head: Head band that covers the ears is suffient down to 20, below that I add a thin polypro balaclava under that to help keep the top of the head and my face warm.

    Hands: Ditto the glove liner comment. That rocks. And I love the idea someone posted about a second pair to change into mid-ride when the first pair gets wet!
    Knit polypro glove liner followed by Fleece windstopper gloves down to 25 degrees. Below that there is absolutely nothing better than Moose Mitts. Handlebar-mounted insulated pogies. This set up is great. Probably pretty water proof too. I'm good down to zero and below with this set up. Only caveats are that they're too warm for me above 30 degrees and it's a bit difficult to get your hands out quickly so real techy riding may not be wise with these on.
    Last edited by KRob; 12-02-2010 at 11:55 AM.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by diver160651
    F.C. lately most days I am out on the road by 4:30am so I am with you on the need to dress for the recent cold (by bay area standards) and I'll acknowledge that my input is antidotal. I'll assume your talking about the mid 30's and this time of year when the temperature range isn't significant during most peoples rides. I gotta assume too, that you are actually posting the question to spur conversation so here are my general take, without getting into brands..
    .....

    Awesome information so far!!!!!!!!!!!

    I start these threads since they help me out first and foremost. But I am happier when I get the most information out of people and it helps everyone!

    Most people don't ask, don't know what or how to ask but can really benefit from the info. Yesterday I was driving to work at 48 degrees with the heater blasting. This guy rolls by commuting on a road bike. Shorts, jersey and half finger gloves. He tried to look comfortable but he was not. I doubt he will commute to work again.

    Please, recommend brands and models. That is what it's all about!!!

    fc

    p.s.
    I think I will start a new forum... Bike Clothing and Protection. And I will copy this whole thread over there. This should be an FAQ article in fact.
    Last edited by fc; 12-02-2010 at 12:16 PM.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois

    p.s.
    I think I will start a new forum... Bike Clothing and Protection. And I will copy this whole thread over there. This should be an FAQ article in fact.

    Good idea Francois. There's actually a really good thread on Passion that's been going since last year on this same topic. I'll add the link here. Cold Weather Riding Clothing
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

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  48. #48
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    RealCyclist has a Cutter Bros. merino wool cycling sweater on sale for $25, 86% off it's $180 regular price.
    I'm a strong believer in wool being slim and from the desert having skied for 36 years and tried almost every synthetic, except for Under Armour. I'm now comfortable in the snow storm and not hot in the lodge. The way wool maintains a perfect body temprature is unparalled by synthetics or silk You will have to try it to believe it. Given away all fleece.
    Lightweight jersey (Patagonia and I/O Bio) for cycling down to freezing, below that I go midweight (Ibex), what I wear skiing and usually ski during the storms for the best powder.
    With wool wear it slightly loose for no itch.
    I wear SWOBO tights (below 35) or Ibex knee warmers, depending on the temps. Also have light syntheitc tights, the one place the material works well, IMO.
    Alway wear merino socks in the cold. So comfy.
    I carry a fleece ear warmer band or wear a wool hat under helmet, depending on the temp.
    Autumn full fingered gloves and carry Smartwool liners if needed, FAR better than any other liner ever tried. Still haven't needed ski gloves riding but that day will come.
    agmtb

  49. #49
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    Sugoi Resistor shoe covers are awesome. I love after a muddy race or ride everyone else's shoes are trashed and I pull my covers off and the shoes are dry and clean. I just wear regular thin cycling socks with them and even road riding the feet stay warm. Inevitably though I'll tear them on a rock strike or something and then they'll start to let cold air in.

    Just got some Pearl Izumi Barrier Elite WXB convertible pants and they're awesome. If it's going to be wet, wear them over the appropriate layers, or nothing, and they're awesome. The cuff can be closed tighter and stays away from the crank and they can convert to shorts if it warms/drys up and there are side thigh vents.

    For leg layers, usually Pearl leg or knee warmers and if it's under 50 degrees I'll add the Descente (sp?) Pro-V Wind boxer under the regular shorts. Works really well.

    I usually just layer up on top with a long sleeve base layer (ebay compression top special) and maybe add a sleeveless jersey under the regular team jersey. Maybe some arm warmers and then a jacket with vents. Still looking for a good waterproof jacket though.

    Have been wearing the Pearl Izumi Cyclone gloves and they're not cutting it for temps much under 50 for me, at least on road rides. MTB they're ok into the 30's. And they don't handle rain well at all.
    Husband - Dad - Bike Racer - Race Director

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    Any recommendations on waterPROOF jackets that can be purchased locally? maybe i'm too picky as I want one w/ a hood and not too bulky. All the ones I've seen in the stores dont have hoods or have a weird fit, bulky big chest for cyclists w/ size DD cups...

  51. #51
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    These last few days I have just been wearing sweat pants + cycling leg band over roadie cycling shorts. I have also used cycling underwear (looks like bike shorts, but a less slick material), and that causes the sweat pants to slide around less.

    I also have a pair of running pants that are almost tight, but I haven't tried them yet.

    For upper body, I use my usual hiking technical wear, namely a no-frills synthetic long sleeve shirt, plus Marmot Dri-Clime jacket. It is wind-breaking enough to hold in the heat, but also has vented armpits. If I get hot, I just unzip the front. It has zippered pockets for holding things like wallet, keys, allen wrench, etc.

    As for runny nose, do the decent thing and bring a pack of tissues with you. Or else snot rocket + sleeve/shirt

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    Thanks!

    Thanks to whomever suggested toe covers! I did not know such a thing existed. Last week I rode for three hours in near freezing rain. My Gortex jacket was great, but even with chemical toe warmers my toes froze. If it were not my local trail (New Melones) with my car not far away I would have been seriously concerned.

    I ordered some Pearl iZUMi Elite Thermal Toe Covers at Amazon really cheap and I think they will solve the problem.

  53. #53
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    Gloves: I'm very fond of Endura "Dexter" gloves for say 30 to 45 deg. Unfortunately the specific model may not be carried forward from what I can tell, but see if you can find a pair somewhere or I'm sure the newer Endura glove will not dissappoint. I've been very happy with them. Right mix of weather resistance and breathability.

    Outer layer... picked up a Hinacapie Designs shell last year for a song on Bonktown. Nice lean cut which I like, taped seams, burly fabric, and good drop down coverage in the back. I dont recall the model, not sure its still carried, but if you see something similiar on closeout give it a try, they use some pretty cool designs, fabrics.

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    Waterproof + Breathable Shell?

    I am hoping Santa will bring me a kickass jacket.....so I need you all to tell me to tell him which one.

    I see Endura and North Face have been mentioned and will research them.

    I am looking for a waterproof and breathable jacket that can be used all year long. I like a mesh liner for wicking as well as zippered vents to manage inner temps. I do not need it to manage the thermal side of things as I layer up underneath for that.

    I have used a Gore jacket for years, but it is done.

    What shells have worked well for you?
    You don't stop riding when you get old, you get old when you stop riding - KRob

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsoul
    I am hoping Santa will bring me a kickass jacket.....so I need you all to tell me to tell him which one.

    I see Endura and North Face have been mentioned and will research them.

    I am looking for a waterproof and breathable jacket that can be used all year long. I like a mesh liner for wicking as well as zippered vents to manage inner temps. I do not need it to manage the thermal side of things as I layer up underneath for that.

    I have used a Gore jacket for years, but it is done.

    What shells have worked well for you?
    Trying to keep it in the $150 range - crazy you could spend $300 on a jacket.
    You don't stop riding when you get old, you get old when you stop riding - KRob

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wheelsoul
    Trying to keep it in the $150 range - crazy you could spend $300 on a jacket.
    Shower Pass really is the foul weather company -- The mens elite jacket is great for all out rain.

    I don't often ride in rain gear unless it is really coming down..

    BTW here is my temp specific riding kits for early morning winter rides:


    Winter Ride clothing:
    Temperature based on winter early morning rides. (Rides starting before 5am and ending by 10am, so the temperature stays fairly consistent).

    I tend to dress warmer on the top with multiple tight layers that have wind-stop in them as they trap warm air more efficiently. And I stay away from overly warm tights. Summer I use convertible items, and less insulation as temp rises sharply during the day, but almost always have a wind vest with me.

    Summers will see more leg and arm warmers even at similar starting temps. For FULL Rain – Shower Pass, Roadie pant and shell.

    At 60 - start thinking about shorts and leg warmers

    55 degrees:
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest
    HEAD: halo headband
    LEGS: Castelli Rosso Corsa Bibtight
    GLOVES: Castelli Chiro Windstopper glove
    SOX: Castelli or Pearl Izumi regular
    SHOE COVERS: Castelli Narcisista white

    50 degrees:
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest, Showerpass rain slicker in pocket…..
    HEAD: Pear Izzumi larger Headband
    LEGS: Castelli Rosso Corsa Bibtight
    GLOVES: Castelli Chiro Windstopper glove
    SOX: Castelli or Pearl Izumi regular
    SHOE COVERS: Castelli Narcisista white


    45 degrees:
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest, Wind jacket
    HEAD: Pear Izzumi larger Headband
    LEGS: Castelli Rosso Corsa Bibtight
    GLOVES: Castelli Chiro Windstopper glove + glove liners
    SOX: Castelli or Pearl Izumi regular
    SHOE COVERS: Pearl Izzumi Barrier covers or Castelli Narcisista white –with toe warmers


    40 degrees:
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest, Wind Jacket, Showerpass rain slicker in pocket
    HEAD: Pear Izzumi larger Headband, and scull cap
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest, Wind jacket
    HEAD: Pear Izzumi larger Headband
    LEGS: Castelli Rosso Corsa Bibtight
    GLOVES: Pear Izumi barrier + glove liners
    SOX: Thin wool
    SHOE COVERS: Pearl Izzumi Barier covers or Castelli Narcisista white –with toe warmers





    36 degrees:
    TOP: LS base layer, PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, PV Capo Insulated plus vest, 2nd PV Capo Insulated plus LS Jersey, Wind Jacket, Showerpass rain slicker in pocket
    HEAD: Pear Izzumi larger Headband, and scull cap
    LEGS: Castelli Rosso Corsa Bibtight
    GLOVES: Pear Izumi barrier + glove liners
    SOX: Thin wool
    SHOE COVERS: Pearl Izzumi barrier covers with toe covers




    PRODUCT INFO listed above:

    Base Layers:
    REI LS
    REI Glove Liners

    Tights:
    Castelli Rosso Corsa
    http://castelli-cycling.com/en/products/detail/355/

    Shoe Covers:
    Pearl Izzumi Barrier shoe cover
    http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/co...Code-9292.html
    Castelli Castelli Narcisista white shoe cover
    http://castelli-cycling.com/en/products/detail/218/
    Toe Covers Specialized
    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...jsp?spid=57863

    Headband:
    Halo Headband (always use unless using Pearl Izzumi do to cold)
    http://www.rei.com/product/710872?pr...:referralID=NA
    Pearl Izzumi Bearier Headband
    http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/co...Code-9302.html

    Scull Cap:
    Under Armour http://www.rei.com/product/798335?pr...:referralID=NA




    Gloves:
    Pear Izummi Barrier soft shell glove
    http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/co...Code-8818.html
    Castelli Chiro Windstopper glove
    http://castelli-cycling.com/en/products/detail/212/

    Portable Rain and wind Jacket:
    Shower pass Pro Tech ST
    http://www.showerspass.com/catalog/m...ts/pro-tech-st

    Full on Rain:
    Shower Pass Roadie pant
    http://www.showerspass.com/catalog/m...ts/roadie-pant
    Shower Pass Elite
    http://www.showerspass.com/catalog/m.../mens-elite-20

    Capo Custom Penvelo Team products:

    +LS Long sleeve insulated Jersey
    Super Corsa Cut
    Winter Quattro (thick Base) and Windtex (Front)
    Full Length Lockable Zipper
    Three Back Pockets
    Silicone Gel Waist Gripper

    +LS insulated vest
    Super Corsa Cut
    Winter Quattro (thick Base) and Windtex (Front)
    Two-way Lockable Zippers
    Three Back Pockets
    Silicone Gel Waist Gripper
    Wind Jacket
    Super Corsa Cut
    Windtex Flight Plus® (Base), Mesh (Side Panel)
    Two-way Lockable Zipper
    Three Back Pockets
    Silicone Gel Waist Grippe
    Jt

    Here are a few Video Trail Guides I shot - just for fun:
    http://destinationproductions.com/cu...PassionTrails/

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