When layering clothing, tuck in or leave out?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    When layering clothing, tuck in or leave out?

    This might sound stupid but when it comes to moisture management and layering for cold weather. Should you tuck in each layer or leave it out (risking plumber butt)?

    I sweat something awful, people comment at the gym how much I sweat when doing stationary bike. I usually mop up the floor when I am done with a towel. In the winter I have a lot of moisture to manage and I was thinking, if I tuck in the layers it is funneling the water back to my body.

    I never really read anything about making sure your layers are not tucked in.

    Thoughts?

    I am not overly large, 6 foot 3 inches and weigh about 200-205. I just sweat a lot and in makes keeping the chill off in the winter difficult. Looking for any slight advantage I can get.

  2. #2
    Rollin' a fatty
    Reputation: DiRt DeViL's Avatar
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    I tuck in the base shirt in my bike pants and the jersey in my windproof pants but leave out the rest.

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
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    yeah, I only bother to tuck in the base layer top. And that's more related to managing my other layers more easily than anything else.

    I get the best results in winter riding by layering more THIN layers than by adding anything thicker. Every layer I wear is able to wick. Even my wind blocking layers can wick sweat. This allows excess moisture to move from layer to layer, and minimizes the amount that gets trapped next to my skin (which thereby gets cold and makes me cold). I prefer wool next to my skin, but a synthetic over it to help speed the wicking process.

    The way I handle things, I still do have wet layers next to my skin from time to time, but with the way I layer above that, the moisture stays warm. If you're steaming, that's a good thing!

  4. #4
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    Base layer tucked in, everything else loose..
    I do try..!!

  5. #5
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    base layer tucked, moisture wicking base layer for me (polypropylene), top layer zipper and arm vents open to help keep me cool.

    With winter riding, I find it more important to limit my exertion level and maintain airflow around the layers so I'm not sweating like crazy. I had to stop once for a flat fat tire during a winter ride, and that was probably one of the worst experiences I've had trail side.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  6. #6
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    what to leave in, what to leave out, against the wind...

  7. #7
    Silence! I kill you!
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    My outer layer is normally a tighter fitting jacket, so I end up leaving my other layers untucked, but they fit under my outside layer
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  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    base layer tucked, moisture wicking base layer for me (polypropylene), top layer zipper and arm vents open to help keep me cool.

    With winter riding, I find it more important to limit my exertion level and maintain airflow around the layers so I'm not sweating like crazy. I had to stop once for a flat fat tire during a winter ride, and that was probably one of the worst experiences I've had trail side.
    Isn't this the truth.

    The most common winter conditions around here tend to be in the 20's(F). Experienced winter riders tend to wear SUBSTANTIALLY less than those less familiar with high exertion wintertime activities. MTB riding in wintertime here, wind isn't a huge deal because the forests and hills break it up. If you find a windy spot, it doesn't last. Road riding in winter is a totally different ball game. Wind is a MAJOR issue since you're more exposed. Generally speaking, I'll dress for temps 10-20deg colder for a road ride. For example, on Saturday this weekend I'm doing a 40 mile road ride, and will probably dress the same as I do for a 20F mtb ride.

    The idea is that you WANT your clothing layers to absorb what sweat you generate, and you want to optimize air circulation so that the sweat evaporates OUT of the layers relatively quickly. You want enough coverage that your body keeps you warm while riding, but not so much that it feels like you're wearing a trash bag. You should be cold to start, or at least able to shed a layer after a short warmup. This is the point of using thin layers, rather than thick ones. You can fine tune the exact amount of coverage/insulation to your needs.

    What I'm getting at is that the wind helps sweat evaporate from your layers. More wind means more/warmer layers simply to keep warm. Less wind means fewer/lighter layers. On a winter mtb ride in the 20's, I might only be wearing a single long-sleeved layer (my baselayer, usually wool). And depending on how windy it is, I could be wearing anything from a simple short-sleeved regular jersey/synthetic t-shirt to a 100wt fleece vest. If it's colder and/or windier, I might replace that outer layer with a long-sleeved wicking wind-blocking jacket (Gore Windstopper N2S - it's 10+yrs old but I love that thing).

    In those temps, I don't cover my face with anything more than my beard. On my head, I wear a simple "summer" Buff that's thin polypro, mostly to ever so slightly block wind (I'll fold it over on itself to give me a double layer over my ears only).

    For flat tires and other lengthy stoppages, it can often be worthwhile to carry a packable/compressible down or synthetic fill jacket. I have one of those I like. The armpits are a more breathable fabric to help ventilate residual sweat (it's actually a jacket made for ice climbing, of all things).

  9. #9
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    Chilled? Got wool base layers?

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