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  1. #1
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    Warmest Gloves??

    My hands regularly freeze during my 2-4 hour morning rides. I will ride in the 20s (plus wind chill). My fingers go numb and get very painful.

    PLEASE HELP!!!...Can you recommend the warmest winter glove (or glove combo = outer and inner glove) you have ever owned? I need brand and model specifics, please.

  2. #2
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    pearl izumi cyclones rock. underneath glove under armour is good but for 40 bux too pricey
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  3. #3
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    Cheap ski gloves

  4. #4
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    I use Pearl Izumi Amfib's... they're good for me into the low 20's. They're Pearl Izumi's warmest glove.




    ...they come in lobster too.

  5. #5
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    Planet Bike Borealis

    I've used a pair for 5 winter seasons, they finally wore some holes, got another pair recently for this season. keeps fingers warm in the 20-40 deg range.

    Plus you can find them for under $30

  6. #6
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    On real cold days the likly problem is sweat and after about 1 1/2 or riding the wet gloves will make your hands cold. I use light gloves and often take a second pair to change out half way through the ride and this does the trick.

    Also try anything with "Thinsulate" it will wick the moisture awary from your hands. I've used leather work glove with Thinsulate in cold for years during hunting... and they actually work great on a bike too.

  7. #7
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    Good job!

    Try...

    ...Heat packs which I use when skiing or winter cycling on the back of my palms, and also on top of my feet. It does bother me that these are a one way throwaway. When I race motos in ice & snow and I use electrically heated gloves & socks, with rechargeable batteries, but these would be a bit of overkill for cycling, but they are cool as the gloves plug into the heated jacket.Toasty warm. Remember keeping your kidneys warm is also important, all your blood flows through them.

    http://www.cyclegear.com/spgm.cfm?L1...=TUC_51-2807_G

  8. #8
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    Warmest Gloves??

    Just a thought. In addition to warmer gloves, you might be able to adapt a cheap pair of moto hand guards to help keep the wind off your paws! Something along the lines of these, these are available through Dennis Kirk. However, you can find anything like these from any shop that deals with dirt bikes. I had a pair on my last dirt bike and they really helped by keeping the wind away from your hands and fingers!
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  9. #9
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    i've been rockin Iron Clad cold conditions work gloves for a few seasons now they work great are light weight and keep my hands toasty

  10. #10
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    We sell these for the same price and they seem to work out well. I even use them at Sno Mountain on the Snowmobiles and my hands don't get cold with them.

    http://www.sagecycles.com/mm5/mercha...ent=AP01LSBL01

  11. #11
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    ask the crazies in the Alaska forum what they use. Seriously. Check out the Passion thread about the mass Pugsley ride - some of them have some kind of permanently mounted mitten-like thing on the end of the handlebars. I'm guessing it's some insulation but 100% wind-block. Covers brakes/shift levers and grips.

  12. #12
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    Some great advice in this thread....

    Quote Originally Posted by bear
    ask the crazies in the Alaska forum what they use. Seriously. Check out the Passion thread about the mass Pugsley ride - some of them have some kind of permanently mounted mitten-like thing on the end of the handlebars. I'm guessing it's some insulation but 100% wind-block. Covers brakes/shift levers and grips.
    Here is the link to Sean Salach's Winter Passion Riding Thread that Bear has mentioned. http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=568561 This crew rides in some really challenging conditions....inspires me to keep riding through the winter in our area.
    There are two paths you can go by but in the long run........

  13. #13
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    Has anybody ever tried the gloves and liners that you are issued in Basic Training? They have a green knit liner and a seperate leather outer. I would think that would be pretty much the best of both worlds!
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by historeeteacher
    My hands regularly freeze during my 2-4 hour morning rides. I will ride in the 20s (plus wind chill). My fingers go numb and get very painful.

    PLEASE HELP!!!...Can you recommend the warmest winter glove (or glove combo = outer and inner glove) you have ever owned? I need brand and model specifics, please.
    I got Pearl Izumi Lobsters which had their max rating. I did a 3 hours MTB ride @ 22~27 degrees and I had to take em off during the extended climbs. They were fine for road riding, and necessary for the downhills.

  15. #15
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    Start thinking ski gloves.

    I wore a pair of insulated North Face gloves. I had enough dexterity to control my brakes and it kept my hands adequately warm.

    This is something which I would look to the ski industry rather than the bike. Winter bike gloves are overly priced specialty items, where ski gloves are just standard equipment.

  16. #16
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    Warmest Socks?

    While we are on the issue of warm clothes, I have a question about socks. The other day when I was doing some trail work my toes were getting a little tingly. I stopped at Wal-Mart today and got some boot socks. They appear heavier than normal socks. They are 66% acrylic, 17% polyester, 16% wool, and 1% other...and as always thanks to Wal-Mart for another fine Chinese product...LOL! Any thoughts?
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  17. #17
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    Neoprene socks, thin ones too. I won't even need booties in the 30 degree temps.

  18. #18
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    Ski gloves work great. I have a pair of spyder gloves that I love. They have a heat pack pocket for those really cold days. Here is a link. http://www.peterglenn.com/node/39929?utm_source=froogleDotCom&utm_medium=PPC&utm_ term=Spyder+Over+Web+GORE-TEX+Glove+(Men's)
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  19. #19
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    +1 on the heat packs, you can get a big box of mini-handwarmers and footwarmers at Costco, BJ's, Sam's Club, etc. Just pop one in each glove and shoe and you'll be toasty!!!

  20. #20
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    Warmest Gloves...err, socks??

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    Neoprene socks, thin ones too. I won't even need booties in the 30 degree temps.
    Thanks! I never heard of neoprene socks, I will have to check those out. Now, I just need to find some to fit my gunships! 15 extra wide!
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  21. #21
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by motoman465
    Thanks! I never heard of neoprene socks, I will have to check those out. Now, I just need to find some to fit my gunships! 15 extra wide!
    Moto;

    Moose Racing used to have them, not sure if they still do!

    Heat packs are unbeatable!

  22. #22
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    Handlebar Mitts

    I bought a pair of these handlebar mitts from Sportsman Guide for $15, basically what the guys from the Alaska board call Pogies. Got them last week, really good quality, and finally got to try them out last night. Just velcro right to the handlebars, super easy.

    Well it was in the 20's last night, and I was out for over 1.5 hours, just wearing a normal pair of XC gloves underneath. They worked awesome, hands were super warm, and it was so nice being able to have a good grip on the handlebars that you loose with the ski glove I normally wear. Look a bit ridiculous, but didn't care when my hands were warm! Highly recommend them!!!

    Here's the link to them...
    http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/c...4&kwtid=210813

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Webbo
    I bought a pair of these handlebar mitts from Sportsman Guide for $15, basically what the guys from the Alaska board call Pogies. Got them last week, really good quality, and finally got to try them out last night. Just velcro right to the handlebars, super easy.

    Well it was in the 20's last night, and I was out for over 1.5 hours, just wearing a normal pair of XC gloves underneath. They worked awesome, hands were super warm, and it was so nice being able to have a good grip on the handlebars that you loose with the ski glove I normally wear. Look a bit ridiculous, but didn't care when my hands were warm! Highly recommend them!!!

    Here's the link to them...
    http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/c...4&kwtid=210813
    Excellent!! thanks. Very informative thread. I plan on riding through the Minnesota winter, and as I've discovered, regular cold weather cycling specific gloves aren't very effective below 10 deg. F. Monday it was -3 F. and my fingers and toes were numb ice cubes.

    Ridiculous looking or not, these look like the ticket to keeping me riding.

    My only concern is how easy or difficult it is to get out of these in a hurry? In the snow, I find myself sliding and sometimes tipping over where I put my hand out to brace myself on a tree, especially on slopes where there's nothing solid to put my foot down onto. Do you just pull your hands straight out, or is there an elastic cuff around your forearm?

    Now I wonder if there is anything like this that attaches to your shoe? I'm wearing basic summer Specialized mountain biking shoes with neoprene full zip up shoe covers on top and a hand warmer between the cover and the top of the shoe's toebox. I don't have enough room inside the shoe for the hand warmer to comfortably fit. I can feel the heat getting through to the top of my feet, but my feet freeze from the bottom up as the sole soaks in the cold from the snow. I know that the long term answer is to buy some winter riding boots, but I'm hoping to find some on off season sales. Battery powered electric insoles would be perfect, but I've not seen anything like this. Any ideas?

  24. #24
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    I bought these a couple weeks ago for Teli. Today was 27 when I went out so I figured I would give them a shot. Grip/Braking took a litle getting used to. But riding on a windy day, with the fleece liner, my hands were actually sweating.

    http://www.hestragloves.com/#/en/han...ro/soft_shell/

  25. #25
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    These look cozy. They're similar to the pogies I use for cold weather kayaking. I imagine you can wear gloves inside of them for extra warmth.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Warmest Gloves??-bar-mitts.jpg  


  26. #26
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    Handlebar Mitts

    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65
    Excellent!! thanks. Very informative thread. I plan on riding through the Minnesota winter, and as I've discovered, regular cold weather cycling specific gloves aren't very effective below 10 deg. F. Monday it was -3 F. and my fingers and toes were numb ice cubes.

    Ridiculous looking or not, these look like the ticket to keeping me riding.

    My only concern is how easy or difficult it is to get out of these in a hurry? In the snow, I find myself sliding and sometimes tipping over where I put my hand out to brace myself on a tree, especially on slopes where there's nothing solid to put my foot down onto. Do you just pull your hands straight out, or is there an elastic cuff around your forearm?

    Now I wonder if there is anything like this that attaches to your shoe? I'm wearing basic summer Specialized mountain biking shoes with neoprene full zip up shoe covers on top and a hand warmer between the cover and the top of the shoe's toebox. I don't have enough room inside the shoe for the hand warmer to comfortably fit. I can feel the heat getting through to the top of my feet, but my feet freeze from the bottom up as the sole soaks in the cold from the snow. I know that the long term answer is to buy some winter riding boots, but I'm hoping to find some on off season sales. Battery powered electric insoles would be perfect, but I've not seen anything like this. Any ideas?
    As far as getting your hands in and out, super easy. They're completely open, no elastic or anything like that. Opening is probably 10" in diameter, so getting your hands in and out becomes very intuitive. I rode with them on Saturday, 20 degrees with 8 inches of snow with just normal gloves again. Out for 2 hours and my hands never got cold. And I crashed once or twice and was able to pull my hands out in time.

    Feet on the other hand, not as warm. I was wearing Neoprene socks and Pearl Izumi Barrier GTX boots, and my feet were still chilled. Only thing that kept them a little warm was the walking up some of the hills to get some blood flowing. And I'm pretty sure Sidi does make battery powered heated insoles, but I think they're around $200.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Webbo
    As far as getting your hands in and out, super easy. They're completely open, no elastic or anything like that. Opening is probably 10" in diameter, so getting your hands in and out becomes very intuitive. I rode with them on Saturday, 20 degrees with 8 inches of snow with just normal gloves again. Out for 2 hours and my hands never got cold. And I crashed once or twice and was able to pull my hands out in time.

    Feet on the other hand, not as warm. I was wearing Neoprene socks and Pearl Izumi Barrier GTX boots, and my feet were still chilled. Only thing that kept them a little warm was the walking up some of the hills to get some blood flowing. And I'm pretty sure Sidi does make battery powered heated insoles, but I think they're around $200.
    Thanks, I ordered a pair yesterday

    I'm dealing with the same issues with my shoes and cold feet, even with shoe covers and hand warmers. I just ordered a pair of insoles off Ebay that are supposed to provide perfect thermal insulation from very cold or hot surfaces and maintain 72 degrees F. I'll let you know how they work in my summer mountain biking shoes with neoprene Pearl Izumi covers over the top. The darned shoes are too tight to wear a thick sock without cutting off my circulation, but perfect for regular lightweight cycling socks. Once the winter shoe deals start coming out I'll strike, but I'm too cheap to pay $250 for a pair of winter clipless compatible boots.

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