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  1. #1
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    warmest glove solution for winter?

    I'm trying to find a good solution for winter riding. i get cold hands very easy. I've tried just using ski gloves, which are usually warm enough, or at least close, but terrible for any technical riding.

    I'd be happy with ski glove warmth, but want better performance. any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    warmest glove solution for winter?

    Got a pair of these. Love them. Super warm and waterproof. http://www.endurasport.com/products/...itcode=E0128BK


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  3. #3
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    45nrth makes some winter riding gloves. Good insulation and padding in the usual bike glove places. I looked at a couple different models yesterday - very nice, but outside my budget for this year.

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    You should probably tell us how cold is cold for you. I'm talking MN/ND winter cold.

  5. #5
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    I'm actually curious too. Not because my hands get cold easily but I want something that's actually windproof and decently insulted. I have poggies but those are kind of a hassle for trail riding. Good for general fat biking shenanigans but on trails just moving around too much (and also generating more body heat).

    The 45nrth ones look great but pricey.

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    Colorado/utah riding, usually around 30-40, down to mid teens-low 20's. any colder and i probably wont ride. a lot of it is the speed, especially if the trails are dry but happens to be cold, when you can keep up good speed for a long time, or if im road riding.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    The 45nrth ones look great but pricey.

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    I tried them on in a store yesterday, and the 2 models they had ARE my short list for gloves. They are wool lined rather than polyester and the heavyweight (in terms of insulation - they both weigh practically nothing) model includes a wool liner glove. It was nice to try on gloves that actually fit me for a change and are padded for riding.


    Sturmfist 5 and 4 are the models I'm talking about, the 4 is the colder weather model.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    Colorado/utah riding, usually around 30-40, down to mid teens-low 20's. any colder and i probably wont ride. a lot of it is the speed, especially if the trails are dry but happens to be cold, when you can keep up good speed for a long time, or if im road riding.
    For that I use lined deerskin gloves - the sort available at farm/ranch supply places. Tough, inexpensive and pretty comfortable.

  9. #9
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    I use PI Pro WxB Barrier gloves for temps above 20F. Work pretty good, don't weigh much, mostly wind and rain proof.

  10. #10
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    Pogies. I've never been able to keep my hands warm with insulated gloves on my hadlebar. Partly due to poor circulation, partly due to non-carbon bars that acted like heat sinks. Also, insulated gloves significantly decrease my control. One time I was going to do a DH race with insulated gloves due to temp, but there was no way I could do a DH track with that poor control. Luckily I had my boot heater chem packets, hold them to your handlebar for a nice warm treat. I use this trick all the time, sometimes to "jump start" my hands on rides where I'm using my pogies.

    Another trick is to get some loose mittens (so you can use the brakes with your hands around the bar) and put them in your frame bag/pack with activate chem heaters. Then halfway through the ride, pop those things out for 140 degree goodness.

    Back to the pogies, they are a real solution. You can roll them up if it gets too warm, but their ability to cut your hands off from the outside environment is amazing. Then you get a micro environment where you don't get any wind effects, where your body warmth is trapped, and where you can use very light gloves, usually summer gloves, into sub freezing temps, for great control.

    It's nice to not have to fight the conditions, which is the way it's been for me with any insulated gloves (and no pogies).

    I do find that when temps are in the -Fs, I need to plug up the small gaps they create near the controls, they have cinches that do it for most temps, but even a very small jet of -10F air can take a toll.

    I remember one time I did a ride in AZ where the starting temp was 5F. It as probably my worst ride ever, after 30 min I couldn't stand it and I was afraid I was going to damage my extremities, even with winter gloves. Now I don't even blink at those kind of temperatures. I use my pogies from around 40-some degrees and colder. I don't care hat it looks like.

    I've never used any insulated/mtb winter gloves that don't get sweaty when riding hard, not to mention my fingers turn to ice and I can't feel them in short order. With my poor circulation, my palms can be sweating due to exertion and my fingers will be ice cold, no matter what kind of insulated glove I'm using. The glove insulation and fingers become heat sinks that lower to ambient temp and just continue to suck heat out of my fingers.
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  11. #11
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    I have modified ATV/snowmobile pogies and Bar Mitts pogies. Pogies are a great solution but I'm yet to find ones that don't screw with my ability to move around a lot when riding actual trails. Plus my hands get way too hot.

    I'm not sure about the op but I need something in between my soft shell gloves and running the pogies I have.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    I have modified ATV/snowmobile pogies and Bar Mitts pogies. Pogies are a great solution but I'm yet to find ones that don't screw with my ability to move around a lot when riding actual trails. Plus my hands get way too hot.

    I'm not sure about the op but I need something in between my soft shell gloves and running the pogies I have.

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    When your hands get warm or up to operating temp, you cant just roll the pogies back?

    I've met a few people that were "afraid" of pogies, thinking that they were going to cause a crash. In reality there's nothing holding your hand in, so they slip out easy, and trying to control the bike with insulated gloves in any kind of chunk/tech terrain for me has been a disaster. That's the only thing that's going to be "between" IME. Either that or tape hand warmers (or use foot warmers) to your bars. They are quite effective.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  13. #13
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    If you don't already have some, good some good arm-warmers, I find that warm arms makes it a lot easier to have warm hands.

  14. #14
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    I find insulated leather work gloves to keep my hands quite comfortable down to about -10C (about 10F). Below that I would be looking at pogies, but I don't ride often enough at such low temperatures to justify the expense, so just suffer on the odd day when it is below -10C.

  15. #15
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    I've always had trouble controlling the bike and braking with heavier gloves on extended descents. These solved it for me:

    DIY Tyvek pogies: http://forums.mtbr.com/colorado-fron...es-584114.html

  16. #16
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    really---pogies

    with PI cyclone - level gloves or better




    wicked warm

    cheap pogies ?
    easy

    paying more than 20 bucks is ridiculous

    Handlebar Mitts: Parts & Accessories | eBay

  17. #17
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    Mechanix brand gloves come in versions with insulation. Not too bulky, and feel very much like regular riding gloves. I bought some for about $10. Probably not what you'd want for 19* and snow, but for 30-45* here they work well. I wore them last night in the mid 30s....my hands were not cold.



  18. #18
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    Layering is key. I use a thi merino glove in my Specialized Element 2.0 lobster glove with good success. Layering allows me to regulate the heat as I warm up.
    Todd :thumbsup:

  19. #19
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    I use these: http://www.shimano-lifestylegear.com...pSccontentsPro

    Windproof, metal lined etc. They are fine to about -2/-4C. After that I also put some liners in. Coldest I've used them in was ~-10C but they did the job for 8 mile each way commute.
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  20. #20
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    About -20C on today's 3hr ride. God I love my pogies. So nice to get back to the car with warm hands.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
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    They're not "riding" gloves but I have some Outdoor Research goatskin palm goretex windstopper backed gloves I love. I use them mainly for skiing (these are thin, not there typical bulky ski glove) but have ridden a few times with them. They are warm and breathable


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  22. #22
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    +1 for Pogies. 45NRTH makes some ridiculously warm, but bulky ones. Wolftooth makes some nice, lightweight ones that you can take on and off easily and roll down on warmer (but still cool) days. Combine these with a light fall/winter glove that still gives you great feel at the bar and you'll be happy.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Pogies. I've never been able to keep my hands warm with insulated gloves on my hadlebar. Partly due to poor circulation, partly due to non-carbon bars that acted like heat sinks. Also, insulated gloves significantly decrease my control. One time I was going to do a DH race with insulated gloves due to temp, but there was no way I could do a DH track with that poor control. Luckily I had my boot heater chem packets, hold them to your handlebar for a nice warm treat. I use this trick all the time, sometimes to "jump start" my hands on rides where I'm using my pogies.

    ........

    I've never used any insulated/mtb winter gloves that don't get sweaty when riding hard, not to mention my fingers turn to ice and I can't feel them in short order. With my poor circulation, my palms can be sweating due to exertion and my fingers will be ice cold, no matter what kind of insulated glove I'm using. The glove insulation and fingers become heat sinks that lower to ambient temp and just continue to suck heat out of my fingers.
    I've definitely found that different people have very different needs for keeping hands warm, but the above is me exactly. Anything 35F or below and I have yet to find a glove that doesn't result in numb finger tips. Bar Mitts were a complete game changer.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhand80 View Post
    Got a pair of these. Love them. Super warm and waterproof. Endura - Products


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    Interesting advice from "coolhand....." Just kidding!
    The member formerly known as Redtires....

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Handlebar View Post
    Interesting advice from "coolhand....." Just kidding!
    . The nickname stems from my first name and a movie.


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  26. #26
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    I like cross country ski gloves with windstopper and thinsulate. I've had a pair of Yoko Thermos for the past few years and they have held up well. When it gets below 0F I need more coverage though, so lobster mitts.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by scandy1 View Post
    I'm trying to find a good solution for winter riding. i get cold hands very easy. I've tried just using ski gloves, which are usually warm enough, or at least close, but terrible for any technical riding.

    I'd be happy with ski glove warmth, but want better performance. any thoughts?

    You will need a very windproof outer glove...with a very warm inside liner....

    Unfortunately you need to manage sweaty hands when the gloves are warm.

  28. #28
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    Pogies have one big drawback

    If you have a mechanical and no back up mitts, you are gonna find your hands will be very cold while you fix the mechanical...

    Also pushing a bike any distance is gonna get hard on the back with pogies (or cold hands).

  29. #29
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    Finally big floppy mitts with glove liners are perhaps the best...plenty of room to run the shifters and brakes, plenty warm and a nice pair gloves inside.

  30. #30
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    using latex or nitrite gloves for liners in your gloves will keep your hands dry and helps keep them warm. They are $2.50 for a pack of 10

  31. #31
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    pogies

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by armii View Post
    using latex or nitrite gloves for liners in your gloves will keep your hands dry and helps keep them warm. They are $2.50 for a pack of 10
    Terrible advice. They actually make your hands sweat, and provide ZERO insulation.

  33. #33
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    Yup, I was thinking the same thing.

  34. #34
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    The Sturmfist 5s are nice to about 32F. I think the 4s are over priced. I have some roadie thermal gloves that barely fit inside my Giro lobster claws. Good to low 20s. But I have Raynauds which has worsened after losing some of my bear fat. I think I'll give pogies a try, but it's pretty rocky here so I'm worried about control.


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    Anyone use these yet--
    Gore Power Soft Shell Windstopper?

  36. #36
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    I did try the red-pepper powder on my fingers technique tonight. Not very cold though, only about 17F. Seemed to work though. Rode a lot of the time with the pogies rolled up and just my thin fleece gloves. Since it was snowing lightly eventually they started to get a little damp, but fingers never got cold and didn't have to use any adhesive heater packs on the bars.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    The Sturmfist 5s are nice to about 32F. I think the 4s are over priced. I have some roadie thermal gloves that barely fit inside my Giro lobster claws. Good to low 20s. But I have Raynauds which has worsened after losing some of my bear fat. I think I'll give pogies a try, but it's pretty rocky here so I'm worried about control.


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    Huge difference in control using pogies vs. insulated gloves IME, in that you get much better control with the pogies. Most of the time, you can use a regular mtb glove or something that is thin, so essentially it's like using a normal mtb glove and not something like those lobster claws, which are ok for rolling on flat level surfaces, but not charging down rocky rooty stuff where you are bouncing around, then the insulation significantly decreases your control. There was a DH race a couple seasons ago where I was debating using some insulated gloves or just gripping chem heaters in my pockets and biting the bullet with my normal windproof gloves. I did the latter and it was a hands down better decision. The race pace warmed my body and hands, but most importantly I was able to control the bike. I tried to ride the course with the insulated gloves and found out quick that was a bad bad idea for technical terrain. No such significant issues with pogies. I even use them on my non-fatbikes for riding in colder temps. Honestly, i don't consider insulated mtb gloves to be an option anymore, since they don't keep my hands warm and they decrease the control so much. No benefit to them that I have ever experienced.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Pogies have one big drawback

    If you have a mechanical and no back up mitts, you are gonna find your hands will be very cold while you fix the mechanical...

    Also pushing a bike any distance is gonna get hard on the back with pogies (or cold hands).
    Huh? You don't go riding in the cold without backup gear, chem heaters, etc. Have you done any mechanical fixes in the winter with any kind of gloves on? You often have to take the gloves off anyways to do anything, as you just don't have the dexterity with them on, pogies don't even enter into it IMO. How is pushing the bike harder with pogies? I can't say I understand this at all.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  39. #39
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    I wish you guys would put a context to your comments. Are you riding in +20 and calling it cold or -30 and calling it cold?

    I consider anything above +10 to be cool and below +10 is the start of cold.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl H. View Post
    I wish you guys would put a context to your comments. Are you riding in +20 and calling it cold or -30 and calling it cold?

    I consider anything above +10 to be cool and below +10 is the start of cold.
    This!

    I didn't reply to the thread, but have to join in. I'm visiting family in north eastern Iowa next week, and live near Savannah, GA. Anything under 60 degrees is cold.

    Next week might be painful.
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  41. #41
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    Anything under 20 is intolerable to me unless my new pogies make a difference. I ride alone at night. Now I know I need chem heaters. I have a outdoor lighter. I ride with two lights. I plan to carry an extra set of gloves. 2.5 DHF/WT DHR2 to minimize flats and crashes. I ride the trails that have cell phone access. What else should I pack?


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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl H. View Post
    I wish you guys would put a context to your comments. Are you riding in +20 and calling it cold or -30 and calling it cold?

    I consider anything above +10 to be cool and below +10 is the start of cold.
    Which is why I use F or C to describe what I'm talking about. You did not.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    This!

    I didn't reply to the thread, but have to join in. I'm visiting family in north eastern Iowa next week, and live near Savannah, GA. Anything under 60 degrees is cold.

    Next week might be painful.
    It will be if all you own is summer XC gear. I was in Oklahoma last week riding around and it was FAR colder there to me than up here in Anchorage, because I didn't pack all of my winter gear, only thick socks and some lightly insulated gloves. SPD shoes are hopeless due to how close the pedal and clear are to your foot, they are simply a heat sink that constantly draws heat away. Unprotected, your fingers don't stand much of a chance either, especially because during descents they are especially not doing anything and your body temp drops. Having the gear, it's totally fine and we can ride for hours and hours at 0F. It's something I should have done a long time ago. I rode once in Arizona when the temp was -5 to +5 and I didn't have the right gear. I tried to compensate with gloves, thick socks, tights, etc., but it was one of my worst rides ever. Having just a bit of the right gear would have made many-a-ride much more enjoyable.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Collins View Post
    Anyone use these yet--
    Gore Power Soft Shell Windstopper?
    I bought a pair a few weeks ago - They're well made, comfortable, and not bad for dexterity. I've only used them inside barmitts on my commuter so I can't speak to how well the windstopper works.

  45. #45
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    What shoes and pedals do you use for techy terrain?


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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    What shoes and pedals do you use for techy terrain?


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    who are you asking?
    Me, I use hiking boots and platform pedals for winter MTBing.

  47. #47
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    I use roomy 5.10 Impacts with Flats. You know how people are always saying how the Impacts are too warm for summer trail riding? Exactly. A medium weight smart wool sock over a thinner polypropylene or merino wool inside these shoes keeps my feet warm down to 10 degrees F. Below that I add a chemical toe warmer between my sock layers. And I give up nothing in technical grip and control because that's the same shoe I wear for all riding.

    Like Jayem said, getting rid of clipless pedals was the biggest key for me. It was much harder to keep my feet warm with that metal heat sink clipped to my foot.

    Someone asked about what to use to bridge the gap between regular insulated gloves and pogies. For me this is between ~20-32 deg F. I use a polypropylene glove liner inside a roomy wind stopper fleece soft glove. These keep my fingers warm, breath well, and allow for good control in technical riding.
    Circulation is key so make sure gloves aren't too tight when layering up.

    Below 20deg F is for pogies. Problem solved. Period.

  48. #48
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    Winter riding here in Calgary over the last 15 years or so has given me the "opportunity" to try different variations. My fingers and toes have always gotten very cold very quick so this has been an issue for me.

    This year, after riding to work in -25 to -32C for a couple weeks and fingers freezing almost immediately, I sprung for some AME heated grips.

    Love 'em.

    Well worth the price of admission. I can ride with a pair of Pearl Izumi cool weather gloves and a Defeet merino liner glove inside a pair of homemade pogies and all is good.

    They have 6 levels of heat settings but level 1 or 2 are all that is really needed otherwise my hands will start to sweat. I honestly don't know how anyone could ride in level 6, as it is super hot to the touch.

    As for my feet, merino wool socks inside my summer riding shoes with either neoprene covers (down to about -10C) or some homemade thermal booties that work well for me to the -30's C.

    I am a big proponent of merino now: jerseys, leggings, gloves, socks and toques.

  49. #49
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    warmest glove solution for winter?

    13 degrees, 0 with windchill. Used Wolftooth pogies with great success. Thanks all, especially Jayem. Much better control. Extremely easy to get in and out of. I got great deals on VP Harriers and close out Impact Highs recommended by another poster. Platforms aren't that bad, and warmer feet are great. A great ride today.


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  50. #50
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    I found a deal on a pair of Sturmfist 5 gloves that was too good a deal to pass up. At just below freezing they were quite comfortable, if a bit too warm.

    Today I took a ride at 9/-13 with falling snow and a 13 mph wind out of the ESE. I keep my bike in the unheated garage and by the time I had my lights mounted (strobes for visibility in the falling snow in traffic) and got bundled up my hands were quite cold. By the 2nd mile I was considering calling it quits and going back to warm up and switch gloves, but I pressed on. Conditions were not great - 1 inch of fresh powder on a 1/4" crust, over 3 inches of dry powder on top of 1" of badly rutted ice. Even with studs on front it was almost too much to keep upright so there was a bit more walking involved than I care to admit.
    Once I cleared that and got out in to the open and away from traffic it improved and the riding was pretty decent on some single track in the woods. Things were going pretty well when I realized my hands were just fine. Thumbs and pinkies were nicely toasty and access to the controls was a no brainer.

    When I ride in -5/-21 I'll report on them again.

  51. #51
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    Yeah, warming up a cold bike sucks. Carbon bars and foam grips help, but you still have to raise the temp of the bar and grips a bit with your hands, which inevitably sucks some heat out. I get that when I leave work especially because my bike is in a cold room. You can try to "jump start" by putting the gloves in the oven on warm, although that might make your hands sweat. I do that with my shoes sometimes, but if it's super cold I sometimes jump start the grips with some chem boot heaters.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  52. #52
    change is good
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl H. View Post
    I found a deal on a pair of Sturmfist 5 gloves that was too good a deal to pass up. At just below freezing they were quite comfortable, if a bit too warm.

    Today I took a ride at 9/-13 with falling snow and a 13 mph wind out of the ESE. I keep my bike in the unheated garage and by the time I had my lights mounted (strobes for visibility in the falling snow in traffic) and got bundled up my hands were quite cold. By the 2nd mile I was considering calling it quits and going back to warm up and switch gloves, but I pressed on. Conditions were not great - 1 inch of fresh powder on a 1/4" crust, over 3 inches of dry powder on top of 1" of badly rutted ice. Even with studs on front it was almost too much to keep upright so there was a bit more walking involved than I care to admit.
    Once I cleared that and got out in to the open and away from traffic it improved and the riding was pretty decent on some single track in the woods. Things were going pretty well when I realized my hands were just fine. Thumbs and pinkies were nicely toasty and access to the controls was a no brainer.

    When I ride in -5/-21 I'll report on them again.
    Darn Raynauds. The Sturmfist 5s wouldn't cut it for me in those conditions. But glass half full - much better control with pogies.


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  53. #53
    turtles make me hot
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    I like turtles

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Yeah, warming up a cold bike sucks. Carbon bars and foam grips help, but you still have to raise the temp of the bar and grips a bit with your hands, which inevitably sucks some heat out. I get that when I leave work especially because my bike is in a cold room. You can try to "jump start" by putting the gloves in the oven on warm, although that might make your hands sweat. I do that with my shoes sometimes, but if it's super cold I sometimes jump start the grips with some chem boot heaters.
    And I was also reminded this afternoon as I got my cold bike to ride home, it takes about 20 minutes for my body to usually reach "operating temperature" during a ride, almost regardless of what the outside temp is. I try to cheat a little sometimes by overheating my body just a bit prior, the tricks of putting the boots in the oven on warm before (you'd be surprised how much of a difference this can make), but just starting from cold you gotta give yourself that time to warm up. It's usally best if the ride starts off with a climb, in fact we actually look forward to climbs sometimes in the winter, haha. Otherwise with a descent, your body temp can just drop like a rock.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  55. #55
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    After spending 3 hours removing snow this afternoon, I took a quick ride in my snow removal gear - including doubled up gloves. Brown jersey under some snowmobile gloves. I got to wondering what kind of stuff you guys must be doing that you need such extreme sensitivity to be able to successfully ride?

    I work as a musician, formerly a concert violinist - yes the real deal - concerto's out front and 7 different orchestras on a rotation to fit my schedule. These days I play clarinet and bass mostly with the occasional run out to play any particularly interesting thing that comes along. Retirement is awesome! Needless to say I've used my hands for some legitimately precision work. I've been riding for 40 years and aside from some heavy weight mittens, I've rarely found my self needing more feel when riding. I generally get padded gloves for less feedback from the road.

    Point being in my lined buckskin gloves I never had any issue with operation of anything related to riding, and the Sturmfist 5 is just barely fatter than a jersey glove. Pogies seem like a death trap for riding on ice. I don't think I'd like them and am not inclined to go out of my way to give them a try.

    I like having comfortable hands when riding - both on the bike and off the bike. Skinny gloves would fall quite short on the keeping warm without being stuffed in a pogie.

    For me, good gloves are the way to go. But I'm in western MN and not some of the cold places you guys ride. As long as it works for you, and you get out and ride, go do it!

  56. #56
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    I know guys who won't ride when it's 100 with a 108 heat index. Everybody's different.


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  57. #57
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl H. View Post
    After spending 3 hours removing snow this afternoon, I took a quick ride in my snow removal gear - including doubled up gloves. Brown jersey under some snowmobile gloves. I got to wondering what kind of stuff you guys must be doing that you need such extreme sensitivity to be able to successfully ride?

    I work as a musician, formerly a concert violinist - yes the real deal - concerto's out front and 7 different orchestras on a rotation to fit my schedule. These days I play clarinet and bass mostly with the occasional run out to play any particularly interesting thing that comes along. Retirement is awesome! Needless to say I've used my hands for some legitimately precision work. I've been riding for 40 years and aside from some heavy weight mittens, I've rarely found my self needing more feel when riding. I generally get padded gloves for less feedback from the road.

    Point being in my lined buckskin gloves I never had any issue with operation of anything related to riding, and the Sturmfist 5 is just barely fatter than a jersey glove. Pogies seem like a death trap for riding on ice. I don't think I'd like them and am not inclined to go out of my way to give them a try.

    I like having comfortable hands when riding - both on the bike and off the bike. Skinny gloves would fall quite short on the keeping warm without being stuffed in a pogie.

    For me, good gloves are the way to go. But I'm in western MN and not some of the cold places you guys ride. As long as it works for you, and you get out and ride, go do it!
    Quite simply, the insulation prevents you from wrapping your fingers around the bar as far and decreases the finger overlap on the brake levers, especially when trying to grip two things at once like bar and brakes, etc. Rock climbing, there's a pretty optimal sized bar/rock/hold where you get maximum grip from your tendons, too large and you can't grip it due to the lever arm being too large for your fingers.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  58. #58
    jct
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    just picked up some endura luminite thermal gloves. i'll chime back in when i get some rides in.

  59. #59
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    Pogies. They don't have to be expensive or stylish. I bought my pair for about $18 (Scooter Logic). No mobility problems, just toasty hands. My hands get tired (and cold) with thick gloves. I don't bike much in sub-zero (F) temps, but my hands have always been warm in the 0-10 F range with my cheapos.

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