Is there a shoe that can fit ROAD or MBT cleats- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Is there a shoe that can fit ROAD or MBT cleats

    Hi..
    This could be a real stupid question but is there a shoes that can fit both ROAD or MBT cleats?

    Is adapter the only way?

  2. #2
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    Hmmm, not sure I understand...? I use the same pedal (Time Atac) on my MTB and Gravel bike and can wear my summer or winter shoes on either. Not sure that answers your question but its all I got.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdb85 View Post
    Hmmm, not sure I understand...? I use the same pedal (Time Atac) on my MTB and Gravel bike and can wear my summer or winter shoes on either. Not sure that answers your question but its all I got.
    I'm looking for a shoes that can put on ROAD Cleats, which is ROAD shoes but also able to put MTB Cleats as well. I believe it's called 'Universal Mount' shoes.
    Not that I've seen these type of shoes but I would like to know if anyone has one.

  4. #4
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    Check Shimano road shoes or maybe Pearl Izumi. Not too many companies do this anymore.

    My question is why would you wear a road shoe mountain biking because of the lack of tread and how will you know that after switching cleats they are in the proper position?

    I just see it as a waste of time. Get a pair of road shoes for the road bike and a pair of off road shoes for mountain biking.

    Yes it is a little more expensive, but it will be worth it in the long run.

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    My question is why would you wear a road shoe mountain biking because of the lack of tread and how will you know that after switching cleats they are in the proper position?
    Actually, it's other way around, I would like to wear MTB shoes on ROAD biking. I know and I've seen many people doing this as well, mbt shoes on road bikes.

    It is just my personal taste that I like the feeling and the look of ROAD shoes but hate the ROAD cleats.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post

    Yes it is a little more expensive, but it will be worth it in the long run.


    Unless you never wear out shoes it's actually not more expensive.


    Sorry op. I'm no help.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pingmonster View Post
    Hi..
    This could be a real stupid question but is there a shoes that can fit both ROAD or MBT cleats?

    Is adapter the only way?
    Switch your road pedals to match your MTB pedals. I use Shimanp SPD compatible pedals on my mountain and road bikes and use the same shoes for both.
    You may have road shoes that only have the 3-bolt cleat pattern for Look compatible road pedals. If you get shoes that are Shimano SPD compatible with the 2 slots on the bottom, and matching pedals, that should solve your issue.

  8. #8
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    Just use SPD pedals on your road bike. I even have a fancy pair of road shoes, but the SPDs work just fine. I rode 139 miles in one day with them and had no issues; see no reason to go to road shoes after that.

  9. #9
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    Yes. A number of brands make shoes that will accept two-hole mtb cleats and three-hole road cleats. Usually they're lower to mid range level shoes. The thing is, they all have flat hard soles so with mtb cleats (SPD, Crank Bros, etc.) there is no surrounding rubber and you're walking entirely on the cleat. A fix for that is to get Shimano cleat Pontoon/stablizers which mount under the cleats and provide rubber walking surfaces on either side.
    Do the math.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Yes. A number of brands make shoes that will accept two-hole mtb cleats and three-hole road cleats. Usually they're lower to mid range level shoes. The thing is, they all have flat hard soles so with mtb cleats (SPD, Crank Bros, etc.) there is no surrounding rubber and you're walking entirely on the cleat. A fix for that is to get Shimano cleat Pontoon/stablizers which mount under the cleats and provide rubber walking surfaces on either side.
    This is what I thought OP was looking for, but now I'm not sure. Shoes like this are basically just road shoes that are made for spin classes (that use mtb SPD pedals).

    Quote Originally Posted by pingmonster View Post
    Actually, it's other way around, I would like to wear MTB shoes on ROAD biking. I know and I've seen many people doing this as well, mbt shoes on road bikes.

    It is just my personal taste that I like the feeling and the look of ROAD shoes but hate the ROAD cleats.
    You realize you're saying two different things, right? You want to wear mtb shoes, but you like road shoes. But you dislike the 3 bolt road cleats. What do you want, exactly? Do you want to wear mtb shoes on a road bike? Then do what others have recommended and put mtb clipless pedals on your road bike. Do you want road shoes that work with mtb cleats? Your options are few and are mostly lower end Shimano shoes.

    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Switch your road pedals to match your MTB pedals. I use Shimanp SPD compatible pedals on my mountain and road bikes and use the same shoes for both.
    You may have road shoes that only have the 3-bolt cleat pattern for Look compatible road pedals. If you get shoes that are Shimano SPD compatible with the 2 slots on the bottom, and matching pedals, that should solve your issue.
    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    Just use SPD pedals on your road bike. I even have a fancy pair of road shoes, but the SPDs work just fine. I rode 139 miles in one day with them and had no issues; see no reason to go to road shoes after that.
    IME, it depends on the shoes whether this is comfortable or not. I noticed it especially on the road bike, that mtb cleats on shoes that have too-flexible soles will result in hot spots on my feet from cleat pressure. Stiffer soles will alleviate this, but so does a cleat with a larger contact area. My road bike is a touring bike/gravel bike, though, so I would never wear smooth-soled road shoes with it, anyway. Depending on the riding I'm doing, I'll put platform pedals on it and wear 5.10's or regular shoes, or I'll install mtb clipless pedals on it and wear mtb shoes.

  11. #11
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    I just put spud pedals on all my bikes and ride one shoe

    back when I wuz road racing and depending on weight and max stability in finish line sprints... road specific pedals and cleats.
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  12. #12
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    Quite the conundrum! I started mtb'ing well before I got on a road bike. When I started on the road, I put XTR XC pedals on my Roubaix because I like to safely walk around when I get off the bike and not be handicapped by silly road shoes and worried about blowing out an ankle because they're as dangerous as slipping on a banana peel. I wear a relatively light set of Pearl Izumi mtb shoes with a tread on them and SPD cleats. The idea was just confirmed when I read info from a european road bike touring guide service that suggested this so clients could ride and safely walk around at different destinations they would tour. If I were a pro level rider, I'd probably go light with a designated road shoe. But I'm not and don't aspire to be. There are lots of good, light mtb based shoes that work for both. The Pearl Izumi Project series shoes are a good example.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    IME, it depends on the shoes whether this is comfortable or not. I noticed it especially on the road bike, that mtb cleats on shoes that have too-flexible soles will result in hot spots on my feet from cleat pressure. Stiffer soles will alleviate this, but so does a cleat with a larger contact area. My road bike is a touring bike/gravel bike, though, so I would never wear smooth-soled road shoes with it, anyway. Depending on the riding I'm doing, I'll put platform pedals on it and wear 5.10's or regular shoes, or I'll install mtb clipless pedals on it and wear mtb shoes.
    Heard this from multiple sources, but I have not ever experienced that. Maybe I'll ride a 300 or 400k next year in my mountain shoes just to make sure.

    I would venture to guess that most people never ride a 35 pound steel touring bike 139 miles in one day. I did in SPD shoes and I did not experience any shoe related issues.

  14. #14
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    I busted a tab off my look cleats walking around about 42 miles from home. Talk about suck!
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  15. #15
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    If you're into performance then road shoes are a little better than spd's, if you don't care about that then spd's are more versatile. As mentioned it doesn't really cost any more either way so you might as well get what you want.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I would venture to guess that most people never ride a 35 pound steel touring bike 139 miles in one day. I did in SPD shoes and I did not experience any shoe related issues.
    Yeah, I was close to that. Still over 100mi, and it was also a heavy steel touring bike. I also used my mtb clipless shoes (Lake MX165) and crank bros candy pedals that I've owned for 13ish years. No, I didn't have foot hot spot issues with them.

    But, I HAVE, in the past, had this problem. It's an issue with cheap shoes and soles that are too flexible. A cheap nylon sole might also become more flexible over time as it gets worn. That certainly seemed to be part of it when I had that problem. You're also probably better off with a "trail" clipless pedal like the current XTs and similar where the shoe is supported by a bit more than just the cleat.

    So I stand by my assertion that it depends on the shoes, particularly on sole stiffness. You can probably improve things by using a more supportive pedal, too.

  17. #17
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    The only shoes that consistently gave me hot spots were sidis. I get hot spots in ski boots too vs snowboard boots. For me it seems the stiffness is the cause of hot spots. Fit am sure is a factor as well.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  18. #18
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    For me, hot spots and/or numbness were due to shoes too narrow, or concave inner soles that pressed my foot together rather than let it spread under load. Some newer shoes and insoles are much better at this and have a raised area in the middle at the end of the metatarsals.
    Do the math.

  19. #19
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    For me, poor fit is one thing, but the hot spots I am talking about are from pressure in the exact area of my foot where the cleat is.

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  20. #20
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    I had hot spots using Crank Bros Candys with a mid level mtb shoe on both my road and mountain bikes. On the road bike switched to a Look Keo pedal and a carbon soled shoe and hot spots went away. On the mountain bike I went to a carbon soled shoe as well and haven't had any hot spots. That was 6 years ago.

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  21. #21
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    shimano road shoes have both. I sold my road bike and bought a gravel bike this last summer. I really like my road shoes so I put spd cleats on them and I run pd-m540 pedals on my gravel bike. The reality is that the road shoes with spd cleats sorta suck because you end up with a ton of float because there is not much contact between the road shoe and the mountain pedal. The very little amount of rubber/sole contact you get from a mtb shoe to a mtb pedal actually makes a significant difference.

    At any rate, I still use my road shoes with mountain cleats and pedals from time to time, but it's less than ideal. I ended up getting a nice set of XC shimano shoes since my regular spd shoes were very enduro. I prefer the low profile well vented XC shoe on the mountain pedals to the road shoe with spd cleats by far.

  22. #22
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    Please excuse my ignorance but is there a such a MTB shoes?
    Stiff sole, light, wide and less of a FLOAT when it come off pedal? As well as the looks..

    Seriously....I need to replace my old M162.
    Tightening clip is gone and cracked bottom rubber mold...(rubber bits next to cleats).
    And a hole on big toe area... not sure how I got that one.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by pingmonster View Post
    Please excuse my ignorance but is there a such a MTB shoes?
    Stiff sole, light, wide and less of a FLOAT when it come off pedal? As well as the looks..

    Seriously....I need to replace my old M162.
    Tightening clip is gone and cracked bottom rubber mold...(rubber bits next to cleats).
    And a hole on big toe area... not sure how I got that one.
    There are shoes that fit the bill. Stiff and light will be a carbon soled shoe. As far as wide fit, Shimano, Giro and Sidi all offer wide fit. Just gotta try them to see what works.

    As far as float goes, that is built into the pedal or cleat. Crank bros cleats can be either 15 or 20 degrees. Shimano SPD pedals are somewhere around 4 - 6 degrees. Speedplay Syzr is adjustable from 0 to 10 degrees. Time Atac is 10 degrees, 13 or 17 depending on what cleat you use.

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  24. #24
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    Probably Shimano's higher end XC shoes would fit your requirements - most if not all.

  25. #25
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    I went around last week, see what's left over after the BLACK FRIDAY SALE and found one that I wasn't expected at all. They had the right size as well. (most difficult)
    Specialized S-Works XC6. It was stiff, and the price as well but I don't think I'll buy another one for long time.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by pingmonster View Post
    I'm looking for a shoes that can put on ROAD Cleats, which is ROAD shoes but also able to put MTB Cleats as well. I believe it's called 'Universal Mount' shoes.
    Not that I've seen these type of shoes but I would like to know if anyone has one.
    I have Bontrager road shoes and use spd cleats on them because i use shimano a600 road pedals, which are spd. in the winter i use my Bontrager mountain shoe on my road bike because of the cold. the shoes are much warmer.

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