Stomach protection from chest armor- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Stomach protection from chest armor

    So I took a nice little fall yesterday where my front wheel slipped off the side of a platform and I impaled myself a bit on my handlebar. Needless to say it didn't feel great. I've been looking into getting a Rockgardn TrailStar Chest Protector since I've heard good stuff about it, but it doesn't look like it offers any protection below the chest. I like that it seems less restrictive but wondering if another chest protector that goes down lower and has a belt around the waist would be worth it. Has anyone taken a spill and hit their stomach with a protector that has a belt? Did it help much at all? Is the belt uncomfortable to ride with?

    Thanks for the info.

  2. #2
    SamIAm
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    belt doesnt really have any impact protection. its really just ment to keep ur innards intact.

    somebody correct me if i wrong.
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  3. #3
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    I've got a 661 Core Saver. It has an integrated kidney belt with probably some of the best protection at least around the kidneys as many other pieces simply don't have much of anything in that area. The belt isn't what I would call uncomfortable, but it does have a different feel and takes a little time to get used to. At first, mine felt like it was constantly creeping up toward my ribs, but realistically it stays in place well. I don't think it would offer all that much protection from an impact like the one you described. Sure there's a little extra material to cushion a blow, but a more focused impact like that from the end of a handlebar would still smart. I think it would take a blunt impact a little better, especially on the sides and lower back as there is more substantial padding there. I think anything with much cushioning around the front or in the stomach area would limit mobility noticeably.

  4. #4
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    suits with the belts really dont offer much more protection for your stomach from impact. especially a handlebar. i personally have a trailstar and i used to have a 661 assault suit. the 661 suit had the belt and for my taste i feel better with out it. felt like i was getting an unwanted hug from a short person. the one thing i will point out though and it was the main selling point for me on my trailstar is if you notice it has hard chest plates. my 661 suit did not. i took a few hard hits to the chest from my bars and i will tell you what the 661 suit did little for that, as it only had a foam rubber chest plate. so with that said sometimes the gut is going to take some shots but thats what crunchs are for

  5. #5
    bike rider
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    Motocross style chest protectors go farther down the stomach than MTB style pressure suits. If you get one that has bicep protectors and pair it with elbow/forearm guards like Fox Launches you're as covered as possible but not as comfortable as you'd be in a good pressure suit.
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  6. #6
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    You could check out lacrosse rib pads, not restrictive since they are made for running.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExCactus
    You could check out lacrosse rib pads, not restrictive since they are made for running.
    Second.

    I play lacrosse and have tried using my Brine Spartan rib pads a few times riding downhill and they took some getting used to for sure but they offered a LOT of protection.

    http://www.sportstop.com/Mens-Lacros...Rib-Pads-Large

    Or you could try the Warrior pads: http://www.warrior.com/lacrosse/gear/protective/rib
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  8. #8
    Ride and Smile
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    Practice falling

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl
    Practice falling
    Any specific advice or do I just turn into Chuck Norris?

    Thanks for all the tips guys. I think starting with chest armor should help so at least I can try roll out of it if possible.

  10. #10
    Now with More Wood
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    Quote Originally Posted by genemk
    Any specific advice or do I just turn into Chuck Norris?
    ...
    Bad example. Check Norris never falls. Ever. Period.



    On topic, as others have pointed out, you won't get a lot (if any) stomach protection out of the belt on a pressure suit.

  11. #11
    SamIAm
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    learn how to roll so you dont just superman and slide on ur face.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by genemk
    Any specific advice or do I just turn into Chuck Norris?

    Thanks for all the tips guys. I think starting with chest armor should help so at least I can try roll out of it if possible.
    Tumbling skills and the tuck and roll are great. And there is something cool about going down and being comfortable and relaxed as it happens. I think falling is a great skill to have and develop. I fell a bunch last season and managed to use whatever pads I had on to absorb impact. I was also able to know what I was wearing and only use pads I was wearing.
    I know you can't predict and control everything, but it is possible to get experience and learn to fall well.
    Granted if you are pinning it, you are wanting skills and luck to avoid injury.
    Luck favors the prepared!

  13. #13
    Underskilled
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    I am sure after 4 days you would have presented by now, but be careful with stomach injuries. They generally don't show until a day after the crash, but internal bleeding in your stomach region can get very serious without much warning.

    If you take a good hit to the stomach, and live in a country with free healthcare go see a doctor. If in the USA, just hope you don't die before the retarded government gets healthcare in.

  14. #14
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    Re-vitalizing this thread, I just got into DH myself and have been doing a great amount of work looking for suitable protection for my sides and abdomen. The best thing I've found so far is the Alpine stars A-8 protection vest. I just picked up the POC VPD 2.0 jacket and it's super nice, but I feel like it and the other pressure suits are just missing a few key areas of protection. Thus, I think I'm going to try to wear the A-8 vest over it since it is so low profile. Do you think it'll work?

  15. #15
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    Digging this one back up...

    @blunrager: Are you still using the VPD Jacket? How is the mobility? Does it get very hot/sweaty? Do you wear it under a jersey? Anything underneath it?

    I took a fall yesterday (wheel washed out on a downhill curve) and jabbed myself with my bars to the left of my belly button. It immediately swelled up. A few hours later and it looked like I had a baseball under my skin. No signs of nausea or blood in my urine, etc. but I went to the ER anyway. A CT scan later, and they verified it was just a massive hematoma (blood clot) and nothing serious.

    Like others, it seems most of the protection is concentrated in the chest or spine, but not much in the abdomen. The lacrosse pads are an interesting alternative, though. I really don't want to go through this again. It could have been much worse, not to mention the medical costs.

    I'll likely be off the bike for the better part of a month at least.

    Not to gross anyone out, but "OUCH!" (taken this morning, ~1 day after the fall; swelling has gone down ALOT if you can believe it.)

    Stomach protection from chest armor-blunt-abdominal-trauma.jpg

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