Ruts in shoes caused by Eggbeaters- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Ruts in shoes caused by Eggbeaters

    Not trying to bash crank brothers; I think the eggbeaters are a pretty neat innovation. Anyway, I've gone through two pairs of shoes since going to eggbeaters. Not because the shoes wear out, but because the wings dig into the soles of my shoes and create these ruts behind the cleats, causing a loose interface between shoe and pedal.

    Instead of buying another expensive pair of shoes, since the only thing wrong with them is the looseness, I was going to coat the entire bottom of the shoe in a thin layer of epoxy and fill in those ruts. Has anyone tried this?

    BTW, this only happens on straight-up eggbeaters. Mallets and candys have the platform, causing that problem to be moot.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethm
    Not trying to bash crank brothers; I think the eggbeaters are a pretty neat innovation. Anyway, I've gone through two pairs of shoes since going to eggbeaters. Not because the shoes wear out, but because the wings dig into the soles of my shoes and create these ruts behind the cleats, causing a loose interface between shoe and pedal.

    Instead of buying another expensive pair of shoes, since the only thing wrong with them is the looseness, I was going to coat the entire bottom of the shoe in a thin layer of epoxy and fill in those ruts. Has anyone tried this?

    BTW, this only happens on straight-up eggbeaters. Mallets and candys have the platform, causing that problem to be moot.

    I've been down this path before. There are some little platforms that crankbros now sells with their cleats. Use these and you won't have any issues w/shoes again....But make sure to replace them or they will end up getting warn down and then your shoes are going to get damaged.

  3. #3
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    I just bought a new set of cleats and I'm pretty sure they didn't come with anything else besides screws. I found this blurb on their site finally:

    "Will the pedals wear on my carbon-fiber soled shoes?
    Normally the wings of the pedal don't put a large amount of pressure on the bottom of the shoe. However, with enough use, or with worn cleats, the bars will wear slightly into the bottom of any shoe. Carbon fiber soles can show this wear sooner because carbon fiber shows scratching easily. We are resolving this by developing a large shim that will protect the sole from possible wear."

  4. #4
    mechmann_mtb
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    there was a guy a while back that posted and he was selling a piece of thin steel, cut to the correct dimensions, on ebay. they were to be installed under the cleat of your shoes to provide protection from having the egg-beater dig holes in the shoes (especially carbon soled shoes).

    hope that helps.

  5. #5
    Dr Gadget is IN
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    An early adopter says....

    Yes, the eggbeaters dig into your shoe sole - not so bad in front of the cleat, but behind it where the adjustment slots are. I note that I have gone thru 2 pair of shoes - but that the shoes were pretty trashed from use rather than the EB slots. I note that as the slots get deeper there seems to be less wear. Getting a looser fit on the cleat doesn't affect retention, you just get easier float.

    But I recently got some really nice shoes (w carbon soles) and had concerns - so I got a pair of the english dudes Beater Blocker plates. Cheap ($8 shipped?) and easy to install. With one minor nitpick: the square edges of the plate "confuse" getting the beater on the cleat! The beater bar will hook on the edge! So before you install them, take a file and put a bevel on the ends. Problem solved.
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  6. #6
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    Do you have a link to those? Google search yielded nothing. I wonder if roof flashing would work.

  7. #7
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    BTW, in response to your comment to retention, I notice that there is a definite gap between the beater bar and the shoe itself, even with new cleats and newly rebuilt pedals. So when i pedal around in a circular motion, it is very annoying to have that much play where my shoe and my pedal are constantly banging into each other.

  8. #8
    Dr Gadget is IN
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    A bit more info

    Well, YMMV on whether you enjoy freefloat or not - but here is a pic of shoes with Beater Blockers (apologies for blurry) that shows the outline. The shoe on the right has about 100 miles on it. The blockers are marred but no groove. You can see that the corners are pushed into the adjuster slots a bit.

    Here is a current auction from ebay: http://cgi.ebay.com/Crank-Brothers-P...QQcmdZViewItem
    Attached Images Attached Images
    This isn't a "you're doing it wrong" topic.

    WSS/OSS: Open Source Sealant

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sethm
    I was going to coat the entire bottom of the shoe in a thin layer of epoxy and fill in those ruts. Has anyone tried this?

    BTW, this only happens on straight-up eggbeaters. Mallets and candys have the platform, causing that problem to be moot.
    Update: I emailed CB a while back, they actually reccomended filling the ruts with epoxy, so I did. After one ride, ~15 miles, I could see where the ruts were beginning to form again, even in the epoxy. Another thing, the shoe is super-slick where the epoxied surface and the pedal meet. So it takes no effort to get out of the pedals. Takes some getting used to.

    So I supposed the best thing to do is use the shims from the beginning.

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