Running shoes for biking?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Running shoes for biking?

    I'm still fairly new to mountain biking. Most of what is availalble in my regions is more XC type racing with some small technical stuff. I've just been using an old pair of running shoes to ride with stock platform pedals.

    I get bumped off the pedals at times when carrying speed through the rough stuff...roots and erosion areas.

    I know that clipless pedals/shoes will solve that problem completely...but...what about the other shoes designed for platform pedals? I hear people say that they "stick" to the pedals. Since I've never used them it's difficult for me to determine if buying a pair of dedicated shoes for platforms would be worth it over my current "cheap and efficient" method.

    I'm not usually riding for more than 1 to 1.5 hours so i don't get any type of fatigue issues from the running shoes. I know the running shoes aren't as stiff as mountain biking specific shoes...but does the extra stiffness translate into a material difference in power getting to the wheels?

    I've no experience at all with mtn bike specific shoes and don't want to waste money by going down the wrong road so to speak.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by muddytire
    does the extra stiffness translate into a material difference in power getting to the wheels?
    In short...yes.

    For a less expensive option you can use something like a skate boarding shoe with platforms. They are stiffer than normal shoes and tend to have better traction to stick to the skate boards which is helpful with platform pedals. I started with some platforms and 5.10 shoes which are supposed to be one of the best combos. The platforms are in a box and the shoes collecting dust in my closet. They did nothing for me. I went clipless and will never ride a bike any other way.
    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    I went clipless and will never ride a bike any other way.
    How long did it take you to get used to clipless?

    My understanding with clipless is that they allow for a much more efficient stroke, thus better power.

  4. #4
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    Not long to get used to it, maybe two of three rides. The benefit was immediately obvious however. Hardest thing is clipping in at the start but you get the hang of it pretty quick. You just have to remember to unclip when stopping. That is where most newbs to clipless fail. It's funny because I did great and never dumped when I started. It wasn't until I had been riding clipless for about 6 months when I finally flopped over because I leaned the wrong direction at a stop. I really felt dumb because I had no excuse at that point. But it happens. Some people are afraid of crashing while clipped in but I have found that when I crash my feet just pop out almost automatically.

    And yeah...clipless allows you to pull up on the stroke giving you more efficient, powerful pedaling. It also keeps your feet on the pedals when things get rough.
    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  5. #5
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    Clipless has a learning curve. For some it goes quickly, some may give up and go to platforms. Practicing before you hit the trails is usually beneficial... From your description of your riding, it sounds like they should work well for you.

    With clipless pedals you can get more power to the rear tyre. I mainly ride singlespeed and it becomes really obvious there. The other benefit is: the bumps won't throw you off of your pedals.

    ("Stock" platform pedals are usually not very grippy. "Real" flat pedals have nasty spikes (usually bolts) that will grip your shins very well too)

  6. #6
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    Cheap solution I used until I went clipless. They work well to keep your feet from slipping off the pedals, and you can get a little up pull with them - nothing like clipless though.


    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Toe+Clips.aspx

  7. #7
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    Clipless is definitely the way to go. Takes a while to get used to them though.

    When I was first learning, I couldn't get out when I stopped at a trails end on a local road. I tipped over on the side of the road and got the straps from my pack all tangled up in my seat. I was totally tied up in the bike. I must have looked like such a clown! A cougar in a BMW sport ute pulled over, rolled down the window and asked if I was ok. I told her I was fine but I don't think she thought I was fine. I think she thought I was a damn fool. I finally got my feet out, untangled from the seat and continued my ride with a badly bruised ego.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by redwarrior
    A cougar in a BMW sport ute pulled over, rolled down the window and asked if I was ok. I told her I was fine but I don't think she thought I was fine. I think she thought I was a damn fool.
    DUDE!!! You should have milked that for all it was worth.

    I'm gonna go clipless just in case a cougar in a beemer wants to stop and check on me.

  9. #9
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    also, running shoes often have a wide sole at the heel for better support when running. This can rub against the crank and be kind of annoying.

    Clipless is great. It's also nice to have some good platform pedals for when you're riding stunts and such.
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  10. #10
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    Getting a good thin pair of flats and 5.10 shoes will solve all you issues.

    clipless pedals are a lot more efficient than trainers and bad flats, not much in it compared to 5.10. They are slightly more efficient, but not hugely.

    I can circular pedal on 5.10 and deadlift my 40lb bike into the air off the traction.

    I am afraid it has to be 5.10, they are a rock climbing shoe manufacturer and have special rubber. You can can get normal shoes resoled in it quite cheaply.

    In my experience flats are more fun, you can outrig, you can move your feet around on the pedals (comfort), they do not stress your knees and of course when the s hits the fan you can spend your time jumping clear of the bike, not unclipping.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  11. #11
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    hey nubster,
    if those 5.10s are a size 12, i would take them off your hands. i just left clipless because i am in between bikes and am learning new things.

    clipless have lots of advantages, but you can develop bad habits from them.

    flats have disadvantages, but will teach you things.
    2017 XL Santa Cruz Tallboy

  12. #12
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    Running shoes and stock flats = teh suck

    Whether you ride good platforms or clipless is up to you. There is an advantage to clipless, but you have to work through the learning curve before you really see it. You don't have to worry about being locked to your pedals if/when you crash. That tip over/stall learning curve situation is different. That can bruise your ego, but once you get past the learning curve, it's not a problem.

    That's not to say platforms don't have their place. They do have advantages if you really like the techy stuff.

  13. #13
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    just my 2 cents, but depends where your riding. If you have to hike a bike up hills, skater shoes have NO grip. I know this cause my son rides with them and I see him struggling for traction to walk up a hill. I was riding clipless till a bad ankle sprain and now (till ankle fully heals) I am riding wellgo platforms with my running shoes and they stick pretty good. When the pins dig into the soles, they work well!!! Stock platforms have no real pins to dig into the sole so look into a good set. my son and I are happy with the wellgo's we got. But eventually clipless is the way to go! I miss them climbing up the hills!

  14. #14
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    I prefer Reebok here Best CrossFit Shoes - 2017 Edition They are definitely worth its price.

  15. #15
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    I road exclusively clipless for nearly 20 years and started using flats 1.5 years ago. It was a steep and occasionally painful learning curve. Riding flats requires skills and coordination you can lose riding clipless. Fivetens can be good depending on the model. I'm now using Shimano AM7s. I like the soles to have some flex so I can feel the pedal with my foot. With a big flat pedal the sole doesn't need to be stiff to distribute the force as it does with most clipless pedals.
    Do the math.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruuuk View Post
    I prefer Reebok here Best CrossFit Shoes - 2017 Edition They are definitely worth its price.
    Totally worth reviving this 7 year old thread to talk about your reeboks.
    --
    stephen


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