Rotating weight of shoes....- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    508

    Rotating weight of shoes....

    Went to my LBS to try on a pair of Sidi Dominator shoes and loved them. That said, the owner informed that they wear quickly if used frequently for walking. He gave the example of a dude that wore his down at Slickrock using his feet for breaks.

    He then showed me a much cheaper pair of Lakes that had a vibram sole which he said was the standard for hike-a-bike situations. He said the performance trade off between the two was the weight.

    My question to you all, is how important is the weight of the shoe?

    My goal this summer is to complete the Leadville 100 in under 9hrs, but it does have a serious hike a bike section (probably 20 minutes of climbing over boulders/scree) and I'm concerned about wasting a $230 of shoes, but don't want to give up a bunch of time if I choose the Lakes and they turn out to have a serious performance problem due to their weight.

    Thoughts???

  2. #2
    meh... whatever
    Reputation: monogod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    5,306
    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    He gave the example of a dude that wore his down at Slickrock using his feet for breaks.
    theyre not meant to be used for brakes. that guy shouldnt have even been out there.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    The Lake Vibram Sole shoe is not a serious bike racing shoe. It is a very good compromise for trail riding, and walking.

    Shimano M121, is a much more aggressive riding shoe, that has a very good sole for hiking.

    The more aggressive biking shoes with the plastic soles are not at all good for walking on scree.

    Weight matters but the fit and the power transfer of the sole is critical.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    The Lake Vibram Sole shoe is not a serious bike racing shoe. It is a very good compromise for trail riding, and walking.

    Shimano M121, is a much more aggressive riding shoe, that has a very good sole for hiking.

    The more aggressive biking shoes with the plastic soles are not at all good for walking on scree.

    Weight matters but the fit and the power transfer of the sole is critical.
    Thanks, Jeff. I'll take a look at the 121s.

    I just noticed that the 121s are all velcro straps. My existing Shimano's (predecessor to the 121) are problematic as the velcro wears out and they get loose. Any suggestions for the same type of agressive shoe, but one with the ratchet type strap that the Sidi's have?
    Last edited by LyncStar; 05-30-2007 at 10:08 AM.

  5. #5
    pronounced may-duh
    Reputation: Maida7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,306
    Lets see here. Its 9 hours total with a 20 min hike a bike section that leaves you with 520 min of time on the bike pedaling. 96% of the time you will be pedaling. I think under those conditions I would pick a shoe that feels good pedaling and has a hard sole for maximum power transfer. The dominator is just such a shoe. Sure they are not the best at hike a bike but your not doing a whole lot of that.

    And braking with your shoes is just silly. So is the whole idea that shoe weight is important. The performance difference between any given shoes is the stiffness of the soles. Stiff shoes = good pedaling, flexy shoes = good walking. As long as the shoe is not made of lead the weight is a very minor factor.

  6. #6
    txn
    txn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: txn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    385
    Shimano 225's: stiff soles and ratcheting top strap. not terribly comfortable to climb over rocks in, but not the end of the world, either. Definitely comfy and stiff on the bike.

  7. #7
    wot no bike?
    Reputation: pahearn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,056
    Quote Originally Posted by txn
    Shimano 225's: stiff soles and ratcheting top strap. not terribly comfortable to climb over rocks in, but not the end of the world, either. Definitely comfy and stiff on the bike.
    +1 If you can find them on sale, for the price they're great.
    pete

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: skunkty14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    763
    I haven't worn the any of the Shimano offerings, but I have to say that Sidis are worth every penny, even if it's a lot of pennies. Especially if you're aiming to be competative in a endurance ride and need something that will be comfortable for a long shot of pedaling.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    635
    buy the sidi shoes. you can't go wrong.

    I have the bullets, which a just below the dominator. All velcro. I don't have issues with them. They have lasted me a long time and have upheld a ton of abuse.

    I still wear the same pair i wore at Slickrock years ago. Sure the soles are getting worn and I just bought a new pair, but I've had them 5 years.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,071
    Sidi Dominators are the gold standard of bike shoes. They fit great and last forever. The hard plastic soles are very durable, much more durable than the rubber on the Lakes (but less comfortable for walking). I've got a pair of Dominators that are over 10 years old and still going strong. What kind of moron would use their shoes to stop their mountain bike anyway?

  11. #11
    No. Just No.
    Reputation: Circlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    5,181
    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    My goal this summer is to complete the Leadville 100 in under 9hrs, but it does have a serious hike a bike section (probably 20 minutes of climbing over boulders/scree) and I'm concerned about wasting a $230 of shoes.
    Zero chance of "wasting" a $230 set of shoes with 20 minutes of hike a bike. Some scuffs and nicks, sure, but that will happen over time anyhow. My Dom 5s have seen way, way more than 20 minutes of hike a bike over their lifespan and no problem still using them. The more expensive SIDI Dragon with replaceable cleats will wear down more quickly, although the softer lug compound has a bit more grip than the harder plastic of the Dominator. Bottom line is same as everyone else says - find something comfortable to pedal in for 9 hours.

    If a light performance oriented shoe accomplishes that for you then so much the better, but on the other hand if you get hot spots from a stiffer sole and can't pedal the bike properly after 6hrs then perhaps a more "relaxed" show is a better option regardless of the weight. Some people can wear the race shoes for hour after hour no problem, some can't. Best to find out in advance if possible what works for you.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by pahearn
    +1 If you can find them on sale, for the price they're great.
    How are these different than the Sidi's?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mistermoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    165

    +1 for Sidi D5's

    +1 for Sidi. I have a pair of the Action SRS that have to be about 10yrs old by now. I have joked that SRS stands for Slickrock Release System, as I took about a 25ft slide on the slickrock trail several years ago, when I unclipped on a steep section and they wouldn't hold traction. Anyway... I have also tried shoes from Nike...JUNK!, Answer, they just didn't feel quite right, but were okay, and some 661's that were no good either. I keep going back to Sidi. If you can pop the extra coin for the Dragon, (the predecessor of the Actions I have), you can re lug every couple of seasons or so. Besides, sole lugs, you can get buckles, straps and everything else to keep em going when they get busted up. When mine finally give out, I'll get another pair for sure. They aren't great for hiking, but they are the best fitting, best performing mtb shoe Ihave ever used.
    luck favors the prepared.

  14. #14
    txn
    txn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: txn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by LyncStar
    How are these different than the Sidi's?

    The 225's are wider, and the Sidi's feel very narrow to me.

    The outer shell is thicker on the 225's, but the Sidi's have a very supple leather outer shell that you just can tell will last forever

    The 225's have huge semisoft tread that is pretty grippy, and the Sidi's have fairly small tread.

    The insoles on the 225's are cushier, as well. After trying on several pairs of Sidi's , I knew I was going to have to factor a new pair of insoles to the cost.

    I really wanted to like the Sidi's, but in the end the comfortable fit of the Shimano's are what won me over.
    . The Sidi's feel very narrow to me.

  15. #15
    wot no bike?
    Reputation: pahearn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,056
    Quote Originally Posted by txn
    The 225's are wider, and the Sidi's feel very narrow to me.

    The outer shell is thicker on the 225's, but the Sidi's have a very supple leather outer shell that you just can tell will last forever

    The 225's have huge semisoft tread that is pretty grippy, and the Sidi's have fairly small tread.

    The insoles on the 225's are cushier, as well. After trying on several pairs of Sidi's , I knew I was going to have to factor a new pair of insoles to the cost.

    I really wanted to like the Sidi's, but in the end the comfortable fit of the Shimano's are what won me over.
    . The Sidi's feel very narrow to me.
    All of these things, combined with the fact that you can find pretty good deals on them -- Last year I picked up a pair from Performance for I think around $110.00 (if that).
    pete

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by pahearn
    All of these things, combined with the fact that you can find pretty good deals on them -- Last year I picked up a pair from Performance for I think around $110.00 (if that).
    I've got a pair of 220s that are great 'cept they keep coming loose due to velco wearing out. Is there a place I could take them to replace the first two straps and get the buckle thing installed for the third?

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    Around here we have lots of speciality shoe repair mod places, for hiking skiing and climbing, someone like that should be able to help.

  18. #18
    txn
    txn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: txn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    385
    You can buy the racheting buckle parts as replacements, so I'm sure a creative cobbler could figure something out for you.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by txn
    You can buy the racheting buckle parts as replacements, so I'm sure a creative cobbler could figure something out for you.
    Thanks! I think that is the route I'll probably go. The existing 220s still have plenty of life apart from the velcro issue.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.