Puffer Jacket Recs?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jahkneefive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    330

    Puffer Jacket Recs?

    Looking to get a new puffer jacket and figured this forum should have some good usage to draw from. Would prefer down in the 700-800 territory and under $225. Something that has a snugger fit, but has stretch would be nice. I've heard good things about the patagonia nano and the mtn hardware one.

    So;
    *Under $225
    *700-800 fill rating
    *snug to normal fit with stretch - not baggy/loose fit
    *No hood
    *water resistant is fine
    *want something that can hold up to some abrasions
    *Could care less about packability

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smartyiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    660

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    687
    Do you want actual down? Your fill power rating suggests to me that you do, but the Patagonia Nano Puff is actually synthetic.

    What do you want to use this for? I have a Patagonia Down Sweater that I've used for years as a general jacket and for layering when it's really cold (or for layering with a rain shell when I'm traveling across climates). it's too warm for anything that's very active though and lacks stretch.

    I have an Eddie Bauer vest that isn't super warm and has stretch panels on the sides that I do wear for more high output activities in the cold, but it isn't that warm. I actually think Eddie Bauer's down is very reasonably priced for the quality, particularly as it's more likely to end up on deep sale/available with a coupon.

    Whatever you get, if it's real down I would make sure that it's treated for water resistance (as the jacket smartyiak suggests is). It's been a big advance in down in the last few years if you're wearing it in variable conditions (or even just sweating a lot in it).

    Abrasion resistance might be the hardest part actually. Most higher end down jackets are made to be super light and packable to take advantage of down's strengths. Down parks are obviously tougher, but that's a serious coat you're talking about. If you aren't looking for something super warm but value abrasion resistance, you might look for something with basically a down vest body and non-down sleeves.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jahkneefive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    330
    This is just a "wear around town" jacket. Nothing athletic/performance by any means. Just something I can wear out, to work, running errands, watching kids sporting events, etc. Synthetic down i'm not against. I have a heavy parka/ski jacket, so this is for those mild/moderate cold days(40-50s).

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    145
    Men's Microtherm® 2.0 Stormdown® Jacket | Eddie Bauer

    I have tried every puffer! this one hands down fits perfect!!

  6. #6
    Rocks belong
    Reputation: 06HokieMTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,100
    Have to watch for sales (spendy right now), but I got an Eastern Mountain Sports Men's Feather Pack Jacket to carry in my backcountry ski pack and am happy with it - especially for the price I paid.

    For around town use in bitter cold weather, I've got a Mountain Hardwear 650fill puffy that is huge and stupid warm. (Think Michelin man).

    Also, check out geartrade.com... it's Backcountry.com's REI Garage Sale type site. You can often find stuff on there that is new but was returned to BC.com without the tags, so they have to sell it at a discount.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    687
    Quote Originally Posted by jahkneefive View Post
    This is just a "wear around town" jacket. Nothing athletic/performance by any means. Just something I can wear out, to work, running errands, watching kids sporting events, etc. Synthetic down i'm not against. I have a heavy parka/ski jacket, so this is for those mild/moderate cold days(40-50s).
    For 40s and 50s where you aren't worried about packability, I wouldn't even bother with a down jacket unless you run cold (or just like the look). In the 40s I do wear my light down vest a bit. I would probably look at the synthetic down jackets.

    If i were you, I might get something like this. With a bit of puffy insulation, but normal sleeves and back so abrasion of the material isn't as much an issue. I like Eddie Bauer's athletic fit, but it depends on your physique/preferences.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    687
    Quote Originally Posted by StevePodraza View Post
    Men's Microtherm® 2.0 Stormdown® Jacket | Eddie Bauer

    I have tried every puffer! this one hands down fits perfect!!
    I was actually going to suggest this too as I think EB hits a nice point of warmth, quality, cut, and price you can often find with their down, but for me it would be too warm for a 40s-50s jacket.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,388
    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Have to watch for sales (spendy right now), but I got an Eastern Mountain Sports Men's Feather Pack Jacket to carry in my backcountry ski pack and am happy with it - especially for the price I paid.

    For around town use in bitter cold weather, I've got a Mountain Hardwear 650fill puffy that is huge and stupid warm. (Think Michelin man).

    Also, check out geartrade.com... it's Backcountry.com's REI Garage Sale type site. You can often find stuff on there that is new but was returned to BC.com without the tags, so they have to sell it at a discount.
    EMS stuff is so underated or really just doesn't have much brand recognition. Not that they have a big line or probably even make their own stuff but damn if it isn't awesome quality and value. Everything I have owned of theirs has outlived and more importantly outperformed every other brand I've owned by miles and miles. ANE winter conditions are no joke.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  10. #10
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,848
    I just picked up a hooded Columbia 700 fill down jacket to serve as my "cold weather" winter jacket, retiring a previous Columbia jacket that had a little more fill, but no hood. Hoods are huge bonus, either under or over the helmet (doesn't matter that much) to boost heat.

    That kind of insulation is reserved for the single-digit F group rides and negative temps, rarely do I need to go to that level, and often when I do, I find myself putting it on and taking it off more than just riding with it on the whole time. Stuff like this is also good for rides where we meet in the middle of the woods in the dead of winter and stand around and drink beer.

    I make sure to buy them large enough to fit over my regular clothing or a slim hydration-bladder-only camelback. When it's cold, you don't want to be taking off layers to put on your "emergency" layer, you can get cold-soaked real fast doing so.

    I have a lighter weight North Face packable "puffy" that has very little actual "fill"(vest-area only) and strechy-arms. That's what I usually have in my fat-bike bag as my "emergency" upper layer, even on cold single digit stuff and less, most of the time I don't have to go to the "extreme" I mentioned above, unless I'm going to be in a more remote area or the exposure is going to be much longer (like a 100 mile race).

    Otherwise, this is typically not the optimal winter riding jacket for most riding, it's not as breathable or athletic (stretchy) as the good soft-shell stuff that has wind-blocker panels on the front and breathable patches on the rear. I generally wear a base-layer and then a soft-shell jacket over that, this is good from around 30 degrees usually down to around zero, but I vary the soft-shell jacket with several different weights that I've picked up over the years. Just normal running/hiking/XC skiing stuff works very well for this and breathability is paramount. When you start working hard on a bike, you output a LOT of heat and need to be able to get rid of it. It's nothing like standing around or downhill skiing, where you generally need more insulation for the wind and to stay warm on the lift-ride doing nothing half the time. XC skiing is a pretty good parallel and it's often helpful to look to that sport for ideas of layering and weights for the temperature range you'll be riding in.

    Above 30 degrees or so, I'll use a base layer and then maybe a jersey and one of my ultra-light packable shell jackets. This is where things get a little more tricky, I generally stay far away from hard/heavy shells, but these are thin enough that they are pretty breathable or have pit-zips and again, any significant insulation and you start to overheat and get soaked from the inside. Since they are so small, I'll sometimes take two even. They are also easy to take off/store, such as in outer pockets of your hydration pack or even lashed to the bike like a tube.

    This is with my "old" puffy jacket on the outside. I have a soft-shell jacket under and one base layer. I had just finished the 100 mile (ended up being 120 due to a wrong turn) race and the temps were no warmer than -10 in the picture. I was in no hurry to get inside and my ride-buddy that was driving me home was getting cold, but I had a hard time figuring that out, because I was overheating due to my effort during the last 15 or so miles. I also had put on full-zipper shells over my normal XC ski pants, so these were all contributing to making me too warm. This was a calculated decision though with the end of the race so close and not wanting to change up a bunch of stuff, normally I would have stopped and taken off this stuff as I was heating up. I don't normally carry all this gear for just a normal ride in the winter! But what I do generally carry is the "next level" of clothing. If I suspect I can get by with a base layer and jersey (40s), I'll carry a packable lightweight jacket. If I can get by with a light soft-shell (30s), I'll carry that same packable lightweight jacket. If it's teens, I may stick my lighter-weight packable puffy in my frame-bag, or if I still want to ride my skinny-tire bike, I'll modify things and maybe even put my pogies on my skinny-bike. I do all this stuff so I can ride and be comfortable, after a few experiences in Arizona when it was well below freezing and possibly around zero and my first season fatbiking here, I settled into my clothing systems that work and allow me to ride for hours on end in comfort, which is what it's about, rather than fighting it or being on a "countdown" where you can't stay out long.

    Puffer Jacket Recs?-28055808_10101392316843078_3147510656994058716_n.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jahkneefive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    330
    Narrowed it down to the EB microtherm 2.0 and the Patagonia down sweater. Tested both out for fit and ended up going with the Microtherm. Had a much more atheletic fit and was insanely thin with tons of stretch. Not to mention I've yet to have an issue with the EB warranty policy.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    2
    Hey, guys. I have a Mountain Sports Leather Jacket and I am very pleased to have bought it. It's so cool to ride in this jacket. It's great that I have a thing of high quality. If it's very cold, I have a puffer jacket. But it is too big, warm, but it is not comfortable for me. And when I bought myself that cool jacket, my girlfriend wanted the same one. There were no female models, so I found her a great puffer jacket here http://www.lilylulufashion.com. The most important thing is that she is now warm to ride with me. And she looks great in that jacket.
    Last edited by brownie17; 12-24-2019 at 08:09 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-22-2012, 08:51 PM
  2. 'Puffer entries open tomorrow 5th Nov
    By Velobike in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-04-2011, 02:50 PM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-06-2008, 09:42 AM
  4. "Puffer's" in Bend?
    By BIGfatED in forum Oregon
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-26-2008, 11:06 AM
  5. Puffer coming to Bend 14th-16th
    By Bobcanride in forum Oregon
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-12-2007, 12:13 PM

Members who have read this thread: 50

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.