Protection at 60 ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Protection at 60 ?

    I mostly ride unpaved rail trails and fire roads however I have tried a few singletrack loops and I do enjoy riding in the woods when the trails are not technical, just learning.

    I guess I should be wearing knee and elbow protection ? Recommendations what to wear and what brands or specific kinds to buy would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    If your are protecting against rocks, or just want a higher level of protection, I recommend that you get pads with hardshells. Look at online dealers (e.g UniversalCycles, TreefortBikes, JensonUSA & many others) to get a sense what's out there.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    If your are protecting against rocks, or just want a higher level of protection, I recommend that you get pads with hardshells. Look at online dealers (e.g UniversalCycles, TreefortBikes, JensonUSA & many others) to get a sense what's out there.
    Good point, where we ride is all rocks and that is the scary part! Not that I would want to fall, but if it were all soil or grass I would not have a problem.
    So judging from what you had mentioned, I should get protection with a hard shell, knee protection alone, or with shin protection as well ? I would rather be not too confined and able to peddle freely.Let me know what you think, thanks!

  4. #4
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    661 or fox are nice

  5. #5
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    I wear 611 Evo XC lite knee and elbow pads. They are pricy but very light and comfortable so I'll wear them almost all the time. The knee pads to tend to wander a bit with time.

    They use a visoelastic material that stays soft until you hit it. POC makes similar stuff that is more heavy duty than the 611 versions.

    There is no free lunch though. Price, weight, convience, protection ; you have to choose which one is more important to you. Personally, I err on the side of light and comfortable, because I'm too chicken to crash much and pads do you no good sitting in the back of your car. I'm not sure how much protection the stuff I wear would provide in a really hard rock crash though. It's great for preventing skinned knees and elbows.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, your input really helps. I am also trying not to fall, especially in the woods with all of the rocks here on the east-coast. I wish there were more beginner level single tracks since almost everything here is pretty technical.

    I will check out the 611 gear.

    Thanks again!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    So judging from what you had mentioned, I should get protection with a hard shell, knee protection alone, or with shin protection as well ? I would rather be not too confined and able to peddle freely.Let me know what you think, thanks!
    If you are riding platform pedals, consider knee/shin guards. The shin part protects you from the pedal if your foot slips while pedaling hard. If you ride clipped in, then just get the knee pads.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  8. #8
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    If you are a newbie, you might be overestimating the possibility of hurting yourself. Most mountain bikers don't wear pads, except for downhillers or or crazy guys like that. As you get more comfortable with those rocky trails, you might find that you become confident that you won't fall.

    I rarely fall. As bbense said, I'm too chicken. But, on the other hand, if you (or I) wore protection, it might give you confidence to try more stuff and improve your skills faster.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    If you are a newbie, you might be overestimating the possibility of hurting yourself. Most mountain bikers don't wear pads, except for downhillers or or crazy guys like that. As you get more comfortable with those rocky trails, you might find that you become confident that you won't fall.

    I rarely fall. As bbense said, I'm too chicken. But, on the other hand, if you (or I) wore protection, it might give you confidence to try more stuff and improve your skills faster.
    I agree most riders don't wear armor besides a helmet, but I don't think you have to crazy aggressive to wear knee pads. I'm a fairly conservative rider, but I do fall down sometimes trying to negotiate obstacles that are a bit beyond my abilities. I've whacked my knees enough times over the years in various sports that I've had enough for one lifetime. And besides, one good whack on a rock avoided and it's worth it - to me anyway.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  10. #10
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    Some 611 gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    I agree most riders don't wear armor besides a helmet, but I don't think you have to crazy aggressive to wear knee pads. I'm a fairly conservative rider, but I do fall down sometimes trying to negotiate obstacles that are a bit beyond my abilities. I've whacked my knees enough times over the years in various sports that I've had enough for one lifetime. And besides, one good whack on a rock avoided and it's worth it - to me anyway.
    Here is the deal, I am in decent shape but 61 yrs old to be exact and have been riding for about 6 years now. I upgraded my Trek HT last year to a GF 29er and I love it. I just tried single track at the end of last season and have tried it several times this year, so far.
    I just recently rode Stewart Forest Trails which are said to be not that technical however, it was no walk in the park for me. I managed to stay vertical but I was slow moving and walked the bike when there were obstacles that caused my eyes to to bug-out, like short rocky descents, root and rock accents stone walls that were lowered but still in place, like not technical??? like maybe not for a tank!

    I realize it takes a ton of practice but I was just thinking some knee & elbow protection would be a good thing at the risk of looking like a newbie, which is what I am. Trees and roots don't bother me but the sight of boulders does tend to get my attention.

    Thanks!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Here is the deal, I am in decent shape but 61 yrs old to be exact and have been riding for about 6 years now. I upgraded my Trek HT last year to a GF 29er and I love it. I just tried single track at the end of last season and have tried it several times this year, so far.
    I just recently rode Stewart Forest Trails which are said to be not that technical however, it was no walk in the park for me. I managed to stay vertical but I was slow moving and walked the bike when there were obstacles that caused my eyes to to bug-out, like short rocky descents, root and rock accents stone walls that were lowered but still in place, like not technical??? like maybe not for a tank!

    I realize it takes a ton of practice but I was just thinking some knee & elbow protection would be a good thing at the risk of looking like a newbie, which is what I am. Trees and roots don't bother me but the sight of boulders does tend to get my attention.

    Thanks!
    I'm 61 myself, been riding for 14 yrs. Here in central CT, rocks and roots are the norm. Though a slow learner, I've come a long way - but there's always obstacles and technical sections I'm trying to master - so I fall down sometimes. And I HATE HATE HATE smacking my knees. I also wear goofy wrap around prescription glasses - better than a sharp stick in the eye, I say. So I look like a dork. I'm ok with that - but I don't feel like a dork when I'm riding!
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    I'm 61 myself, been riding for 14 yrs. Here in central CT, rocks and roots are the norm. Though a slow learner, I've come a long way - but there's always obstacles and technical sections I'm trying to master - so I fall down sometimes. And I HATE HATE HATE smacking my knees. I also wear goofy wrap around prescription glasses - better than a sharp stick in the eye, I say. So I look like a dork. I'm ok with that - but I don't feel like a dork when I'm riding according to the ratings so you arg!

    Very ironic we are the same age and doing the same thing only it appears you have more skill and experience and I am just learning but will stick with it. Saturday was my first time on singletrack being clipped in, that was an experience in itself. I never fell on the singletrack but on Sunday, I fell on the side of a road while trying to mount on my bike, can you believe that, I banged both knees and landed hard on my knees and palm.

    I did check out your public site and your favorite trail and that Park is very technical, rated as very difficult, so you are doing really well and who cares about the protection. One of the other riders at Stewart Forest that I had started talking with had told me his Dad was just 60 and wished he would get involved in biking and his Dad said never, I am too old to ride a bike, could you imagine what he is missing!

    Well at any rate, I will continue to practice and learn however I wish there were more singletracks that were not too advanced or technical even thou Stewart Forest in NY is said to be an open and easy blend of trails??? Perhaps for most but not me at this point in time!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I mostly ride unpaved rail trails and fire roads however I have tried a few singletrack loops and I do enjoy riding in the woods when the trails are not technical, just learning.

    I guess I should be wearing knee and elbow protection ? Recommendations what to wear and what brands or specific kinds to buy would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    I'm 66 and started riding around March of last year. No previous mountain biking experience and hadn't been on a bicycle since I was a kid.

    When I started I fell regularly and after I ripped a pair of jeans I was wearing from knee to ankle simply falling over against a rock, very quickly realized that needed to get some kind of shin/knee protection. I ended up with something very similar to these:

    Knee/shin guards:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ANR9XK

    I got mine at an LBS for about $45 and started wearing them immediately. These now have a LOT of scratches and dents in them that I'm very glad aren't in my shins!

    About a month or so later I had my worst crash--OTB and through about 8 ft of cactus plants--where my whole torso and arms looked like a pincushion--I thought I'd better think about some arm protection also. I got these, which are still on sale at Blue Sky Cycling.

    Elbow pads:

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...bow-Guards.htm

    I'm getting better at riding and I haven't had a major crash (knock on wood) since the cactus incident, but I still wear both of these whenever I go riding. Despite their relatively low cost and perhaps awkward appearance, I really don't notice either of them being super uncomfortable. Perhaps when I reach a higher skill and confidence level I might consider dispensing with them, but not yet.

    HTH.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porschefan View Post
    I'm 66 and started riding around March of last year. No previous mountain biking experience and hadn't been on a bicycle since I was a kid.

    When I started I fell regularly and after I ripped a pair of jeans I was wearing from knee to ankle simply falling over against a rock, very quickly realized that needed to get some kind of shin/knee protection. I ended up with something very similar to these:

    Knee/shin guards:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ANR9XK

    I got mine at an LBS for about $45 and started wearing them immediately. These now have a LOT of scratches and dents in them that I'm very glad aren't in my shins!

    About a month or so later I had my worst crash--OTB and through about 8 ft of cactus plants--where my whole torso and arms looked like a pincushion--I thought I'd better think about some arm protection also. I got these, which are still on sale at Blue Sky Cycling.

    Elbow pads:

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...bow-Guards.htm

    I'm getting better at riding and I haven't had a major crash (knock on wood) since the cactus incident, but I still wear both of these whenever I go riding. Despite their relatively low cost and perhaps awkward appearance, I really don't notice either of them being super uncomfortable. Perhaps when I reach a higher skill and confidence level I might consider dispensing with them, but not yet.

    HTH.
    Sound great, thanks for the info! It is good to take precautions so we can keep going and not loose time due to a senseless injury!

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