Pedals and Shoes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Pedals and Shoes

    Hello to all and may this cool weather persist. I just recently bought a turner 5 spot and I have jumped right into the sport of Mtbing. I have 8 rides under my belt with the toughest being from gateway trail head up to windgate pass (Mcdowells) and hawes up to the towers. I often had to hike a bike but I think I am learning my bike and how to ride it pretty fast. My used bike came with shimano spd click in pedals. I had never used anything like that so I bought some shoes and jumped right in. I have noticed on some of the videos that some riders do not attach their feet to the pedals. Needless to say "getting out" sometimes is very difficult especially climbing. My question is what are the advantages/disadvantages for each? Should I stay with what I have, and what other options or recommendations are there? Honest opinions are appreciated and thank you in advance for any incite that you may have.

  2. #2
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    Shimano's SPD is good system in that for beginners, a rider can release from the pedal by side slipping leading with the heel or if the tension is set low enough in a panic situation, a rider can just pull the foot straight out. The biggest problem I have with Shimano's system is that the shoes that go with these pedals (traditional bike shoes) are only comfortable when cycling and little else. I personally liked using the Crank Brothers EggBeater system. I used the the Mallet pedals with SixSixOne Filter Shoes. The pedals are slightly concave giving feel of the full pedal and the shoes are flexible enough when it comes to hike a bike time and stiff enough to get a good pedal down on the way up.

    BTW, have recently gone to a flat pedal set up, after many years in clips. Happy Hunting!
    Pumpin & Pimpin

  3. #3
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    With clip-in pedals you get the full rotation instead of just pressing down on the pedals. Great for easy flowly and long trails since less energy is used. Some people also like it for jumping to help assist in throwing the bike around... But requires landing confidence since the bail factor is high. Also people like them for jittery rock gardens when your feet can get bounced off.
    Just about all downhill riders do no used clip-ins, sooo many reasons for that though....
    Rock throws you funny... Bail or throw a leg out quickly to get back on the trail.
    See a tree, cliff, person, rock, etc. that you can't get away from... Bail

    If you are just starting out I personally wouldn't use them. Get some 5ten shoes with some grippy pedals and you should be golden.

    My $.02
    Last edited by kubo; 05-27-2010 at 07:53 AM.

  4. #4
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    Actually most of the top world cup dh riders,gee,gwin,peat,minaar are clipped in but its all personal preference. I go back and forth using shimano dx pedal 647 shoe spd combo. All my xc is clipped in and dh on south clipped in. Since most of my riding will up north this summer I will probably use flat pedals for the techier slow trails like the reserves where the bail factor is high. if you do go the route of clips definitely check out the 647 since they have a larger platform.
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  5. #5
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    I only use clips on the roadie anymore and with that, only Shimano SPD's. I absolutely hate Egg Beaters, have not tried Times.

    Flats with 5.10's for everything else.

  6. #6
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    I would not suggest egg beaters for AZ riding.....I've seen them break a few times on our rocks....and have heard of many other times from friends of them breaking. If you like the clip concept of the egg beaters, then I would also suggest you check out Time ATAC's. I tend to hit my pedals more than most and have had these for 1.5 years and they are still holding strong.

    I also learned to ride on SPD's, and then made the switch to the ATAC's because I read they had greater float which would help my knee out. They certainly made it less painful, but one of the other benefits to which I felt the moment I started riding them was that they were easier to get out of in panic/crisis situations. This lead to me having greater confidence on more challenging terrain.....and I figured if I had started out with them, I would have been better off.....but that's just conjecture at this point. Welcome and enjoy. The tower climb on Hawes is no walk in the park, especially this time of year.




  7. #7
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    I ride SPD pedals and have multi-release cleats mounted on shimano shoes with their recessed cleat attachment. Works great for me, especially if I need to bail. No problems walking on any surface, and the lugs in the soles give good traction.
    Hey everybody, ride my wheels! They ride good, real good.
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  8. #8
    Two wheels are better
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    This is a topic that comes up a lot and seems to boil down to personal preference. There are pros and cons to both and a lot of it depends on what you are comfortable with. However, there is one point that does not get mentioned much and that is knee health. If you have knee problems you should take this decision seriously as the wrong setup has the potential to accentuate your knee issues.

    Just as an FYI, I run Wah-Wah flats with 5-10 shoes for all riding types because clipping in causes me knee pain. Learned this the hard way from years of road riding clipped in.
    "There are two kinds of people in this world that go around beardless—boys and women, and I am neither one"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo
    I ride SPD pedals and have multi-release cleats mounted on shimano shoes with their recessed cleat attachment. Works great for me, especially if I need to bail. No problems walking on any surface, and the lugs in the soles give good traction.
    +1

    Me and my girlfriend both ride the 647 pedals with SH-56 Multi-Release cleat. Works fantastic on rocky, technical trails. Good power for climbing, and lunging up rock steps, and instant release when needed.

    And the platform allows you to do a couple pedal strokes after a restart if you miss the initial clip in. This does not happen much, as they are super easy to clip into, and usually it just takes moving the foot back a little and in you go.

    And unlike Crack Brothers junk, they take massive abuse on rocks without problems.

  10. #10
    [email protected]#$%&!
    Reputation: zukicidal's Avatar
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    I started out a couple years ago with spd's but never really liked them. My biggest issue is my toes go numb only after a few minutes of pedaling. I've adjusted the cleats back and forth but no change. I also took a few bad falls while clipped in. I went back to flats and I feel SO much better. Like I'm free! I also agree its personal preference so try both.

  11. #11
    ride more, blog less
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    5.10's and some platforms....
    i like these odds....

  12. #12
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    Yup, a lot of personal preference on this topic. For me, it is Shimano SPDs. I've been on them for years and haven't looked back. I have heard lots of good things about Time pedals, in terms of float and durability. To keep my opinion in context, I have no knee problems; I pride myself in being tough on the climbs; I don't get too crazy on the downhill stuff. I ride XTR pedals and bounce them off South Mountain rocks at least several days a week and haven't had a related equipment failure (yet).

  13. #13
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    When I first went clipless, I bought a pair of Forte campus pedals. One side is platform the other you clip in. Once I got used to being clipped in, I felt strange not being clipped even on technical sections. I bought a pair of shimano 520's and have no issues with them. I too have bashed them quite a few times and they still keep me connected.

    zukicidal- Dr. told me the main reason for feet or toes going numb is the shoe not fitting properly or being too tight. If you squeeze your two smallest toes together for to long it pinches a nerve that runs between them and causes the numbness. I had this too, now when I tighten my shoes I curl my toes so I don't over tighten.

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