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  1. #1
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    New Five Ten Freeriders...feet "falling asleep".

    I just picked up a pair of the regular Freeriders from REI. I wore them around the house a few days tight to try to break them in a bit, they're really puffy/padded around the tongue. Rode them for about 2.5 hours the other day, probably 1.5 hours in the saddle. I noticed about half way through the ride my toes were getting numb?? I do have a higher arch/wider foot. They fit fine. But they do feel a little snug when I first lace them up, then as soon as I walk off in them they feel normal. Love the sticky soles and the stiffness. Will they break in to where this won't happen??

  2. #2
    jcd's best friend
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    That's an odd problem to have. Could your feet be too wide for the shoe itself? I have wide feet, wear FiveTen Impacts, and I have no issues with numbness or tingling. Have you tried to loosen up the laces a little bit?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    That's an odd problem to have. Could your feet be too wide for the shoe itself? I have wide feet, wear FiveTen Impacts, and I have no issues with numbness or tingling. Have you tried to loosen up the laces a little bit?
    The laces could have been too tight. The shoe is SO puffy, they seem to feel a bit snug when I lace them up trying to make them look like the're not so huge, but as soon as I walk away in them they feel fine, no pressure at all. Matter of fact I wore them driving the 1.5 hours to the riding area before the ride. I'm sure they just need to be broke in. They were great the first hour or so. There is so much padding in the tongue I think I was trying to compress that a bit too much. It was just my toes, felt like cold/frozen toes, but it was 55 degrees out.

  4. #4
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    Your laces are too tight. I had this problem when I first got mine(from REI also) and discovered the next ride that I can have the bottom laces tight but loosened the top one or two(not a lot) and it didn't happen. They will stay on your feet just fine even with drops and jumps.

  5. #5
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    What socks are you using? Might want to try a few different pairs/thicknesses. Some sock with "support" bug my feet.

  6. #6
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    Okay all good to know! I'll try them looser and maybe lace them up around something when I'm not wearing them.

    I only wear thin socks. I'm this case some smartwool phd cycling socks.

  7. #7
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    welcome to my world.. I have a circulatory disease and my feet go numb the second it gets below 60degress.. (needless to say I haaaaate winter also hands go numb as well).

    but yeah like said I think you have them laced to tight.. In fact I made that mistake today as well and my right foot was going numb.. loosen them up a bit.

  8. #8
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    I have a mild Reynaud's, and can't wear tight shoes in the cold, which is one reason I went to flats. I wear size 14 Canvas Freeriders which have been discontinued. Unlike my Shimano size 14 extra-wide clipless shoes - no issues in the cold with the freeriders. After scouring the internet, I have a spare set "mint in box".

    I find my regular (non-canvas) size 14 Freeriders not as comfortable, with hard spots inside the shoe, and for that reason have not used them much.

  9. #9
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    It's becoming more common than one would think.

    Another thread, but started with the thought of it being the pedal.

    I had numbing on each ride for a dozen rides with 510 shoes on 2 sets of pedals. Nothing worked for me, every ride. Different lacing. Different socks. Different pedals.

    It's been suggested to use an insole.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/components/r...s-1096117.html

  10. #10
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    Well, I do have a higher foot and have trouble with certain brands like Nike being too tight across the top of my foot, they take a while to break in. And now that I think about it, once my toes started going a little "cold" when pedaling, they went totally numb while standing on descents...which would be putting more pressure onto the top of the foot. As mentioned above, thankfully I went with REI. If they don't work out I'll happily go back to my cross training shoes.

  11. #11
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    For me, it feels like my sock is wrapped tightly around a toe.

    I'm a runner and I've been taught how to relace a shoe to relieve pressure from pressure points. I'd get numb, sometimes, in running shoes about 2 miles into a run all the time.
    It's not every pair so it's hard to pinpoint the problem. As soon as I feel the sensation I redo the laces and it feels perfect.

    On the bike shoe though, nothing I did would correct it. I went so far as loosening the shoe to the point where I could kick it off and I was numbing.
    Maybe an insole would have been good for me. I now have Bontrager Flatline shoes and I'm pretty good with no numbing. I have to pay attention and move around enough to prevent it though. I'm experimenting with foot placement more than anything.
    If anything, I think the cycling shoe is helping with a better foot position, I guess. I like to ride on the ball of the foot, I get a lot more power that way. But the midfoot placement doesn't make me numb.

  12. #12
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    I thought about the foot position as well. My regular cross training Nike shoes I wear I can feel the ball of my foot in the right position. The stiffer freeriders are so much stiffer it's hard to tell exactly where my foot is located one the pedal. As someone else mentioned, you don't feel like you need perfect placement to get a platform to pedal from...but that could be a culprit if my foot is out of ideal pedaling position and causing a weird pressure point. Of course it's snow and ice again in KC so will be a while before I can actually RIDE in the shoes.

  13. #13
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    I've ridden in old running shoes for years. A year ago I tried the 510 shoe and had to return them. A year later I switched to the Bontrager (a little over a month ago now).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    I've ridden in old running shoes for years. A year ago I tried the 510 shoe and had to return them. A year later I switched to the Bontrager (a little over a month ago now).
    How do the Flatline shoes run size wise? I may order a pair. I wear a 11 in Adidas and 11.5 in Nike.

    EDIT...I just found your review! I'll order the 44/11 I think.

  15. #15
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    Trek has their comfort guarantee also. If it's the wrong size you can swap it for another. If the shoe doesn't work you will get a store credit (if you purchase from a local shop).
    I don't know exactly how the guarantee works, but that is what I remember my local retailer describing.

  16. #16
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    Padding is really detrimental to circulation. If you look at athletic shoes from companies that know what theyre doing youll notice there is almost no padding and the fit comes down to the lacing system. I have road shoes with zero padding and running shoes with a few mm's of padding, no issues with those, when I had Five Tens they felt great at first because of all the padding but after 30min it was hot spot hell. Five Ten is the best at rubber but when it comes to shoe ergonomics they are clueless.

    Same thing can be seen with saddles, a soft cruiser saddle will cut off circulation a lot faster than a high density foam saddle.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by idividebyzero View Post
    Padding is really detrimental to circulation. If you look at athletic shoes from companies that know what theyre doing youll notice there is almost no padding and the fit comes down to the lacing system. I have road shoes with zero padding and running shoes with a few mm's of padding, no issues with those, when I had Five Tens they felt great at first because of all the padding but after 30min it was hot spot hell. Five Ten is the best at rubber but when it comes to shoe ergonomics they are clueless.

    Same thing can be seen with saddles, a soft cruiser saddle will cut off circulation a lot faster than a high density foam saddle.
    Yep, after riding my nike cross trainer shoes for the last 6 months, then trying on the 5 10 I was really surprised how "skater" shoe they were. Sole and stiffness are great, but not sure why they designed such a heavy and heavily padded shoe for mtn biking? I mean guys seem to LOVE them so who am I to argue? But I'm also not bashing monster downhills or big drops, so maybe they're over kill for me anyway. My only gripe with the Nike shoes is they're so ventilated they're cold in the winter.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by escrowdog View Post
    My only gripe with the Nike shoes is they're so ventilated they're cold in the winter.
    My MTB shoe of choice was a Salomon trail runner for many years. Similar to you the venting made them cold I tried duct taping the front but the best solution for me was a neoprene toe sock. Have a look at my Hot Sockee, may work really well for your usage.




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  19. #19
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    Try the Ride Concepts Livewire or Hellion. Much better fit than a Freerider, stiffer midsole, and the D30 insole is super high quality. And the grip is just as good. More for your money with these.

  20. #20
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    The freerider VXIs are way better. They have thinner padding. I've had a single pair of the regular freeriders and several of the VXIs.

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