Need Advise- Winter riding gear? (gloves,booties, etc)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Need Advise- Winter riding gear? (gloves,booties, etc)

    Another experienced cyclist new to Denver area question. Thanks for your patience.

    Any advise as to what works best for this coming winter. I just moved here a couple of months ago from a warmer climate and am getting prepared mentally and gear wise for the cold months.

    I am primarily a mtb'er, but also enjoy my monstercross and road bikes. So far, I have been riding mostly Waterton Cyn/Rox loop and Co. Springs mtb rides and Chatfield /Deer Creek/ Highgrade road rides. I hope to get out as much as reasonably possible when weather and schedule permits this winter. I live off C470/University and think there are some interesting opportunites and choices. Am I delusional?

    Any advise as to good warm gear would be appreciated. Also any recommended trails, roads, paths or organized rides that you locals have had good luck with in the past. What works? What doesn't?

    I am currently assessing my cold weather gear and what I am going to need to add. I have decent upper body layers, but definitely need advise on gloves, booties, heavier tights and head gear.

    Thanks for the help and advise,
    Tim

  2. #2
    !Vamos, flaco!
    Reputation: Pabs's Avatar
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    I ride all winter long, including a commute that is often quite cold . . . if you don't wear the right clothes. Wool and layers are you best friends. Also, don't limit yourself to "cycling" clothing. Finally, keep your ties fresh. Changing flats in the cold is the worst.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  3. #3
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    imho. Not much differenct at same temps from back east.

    I dress the same as I do for my east coast Atl/Ga. rides.(Spit time between Den./Atl)
    Some over react to snow. But, keep feet dry and warm.
    (lower humidity and the cold does not bite as much in Denver.)Wallmart has great hand/foot warmers that help during the colder times. (rei versions are way to expensive.)
    Cross Country Skis for great fun when things are snowed in and for absoutely insanely/painly fun cross training. You'll see folks out with thier ski-rollers-thingys and polls on bikeways now.
    Balakav, good gloves,medium vest (under 45 degrees http://www.rei.com/product/753606, dunno why it works but it does. Rest of time at higher temp just a wind vest and arm warmers), neo-booties. Then in case of stopping for extended times or weather change I have super light weight wind jacket and medium weight depending on conditions.

  4. #4
    slow
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    Start off a bit cold. You'll warm up. Neoprene shoe covers are great. Wear layers. Keep the ears warm. Like mentioned above, don't think just bike stuff. In really cold weather, I ride in my ski helmet. Lobster mitts are your friends.

  5. #5
    old skool newbie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pabs
    ... Finally, keep your ties fresh...
    This could be good advice for keeping the wind off your chest, but I would wear a wide 70's style tie vs. a thin 80's style tie

    Layering is key, and having a protective wind proof layer helps - like shell gloves over thinner gloves; windbreaker over vest, over ljs's. Anything that you can take on and off quickly will help regulate your temperature. Try to avoid getting too hot, as a sweat will chill you very quick.

    The trails are ridable until the first good snow stays on the ground. Then, once the other trail users (hikers) pack down the snow you can ride all the way up to mud season.
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  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Check out the stuff from Endura. Kinda spendy, but some killer nlooking goods for sure. I really want that new Stealth soft shell jacket, but can't dole out 300 bones right now for it.

    +1 for shoe covers. I have an old pair of XL socks that I throw over the shoes for chillier rides, but also have real shoe covers when it gets real nasty out.

  7. #7
    enlightened.
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    I don't know what the guy from Atlanta is talking about, I'm from Tallahassee and it is far more cold in Colorado then there.

    When commuting in really cold weather I wear:

    feet: thick wool hiking socks, grocery bags, shoes and toe covers.

    bottoms: lycra, knee warmers, endura tights (worth every penny) and I tuck in the tops of the grocery bags into the tights.

    top: tank top, short sleeve shirt, arm warmers, long sleeve jersey, this sugoi technical hoodie thing that I couldn't imagine not owning (it covers everything but my face); all topped with a breathable rain shell. When it snows I wear goggles rather than clear lenses.

    Hands- burton goretex gloves.

    I've issues with my feet and hands getting cold but the core is toasty warm.

  8. #8
    slow
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    +1 on the goggles for snowy rides

    Quote Originally Posted by athalliah
    I don't know what the guy from Atlanta is talking about, I'm from Tallahassee and it is far more cold in Colorado then there.
    When my folks lived in ATL, we flew out of there on numerous occasions in cold damp weather, only to arrive in DEN to sunshine and warmer temps than what we left. This usually happened at Christmas, T-Giving, or spring break. Doesn't happen now that they are in Tally. That couple hundred miles makes a big difference.

  9. #9
    enlightened.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak
    +1 on the goggles for snowy rides



    When my folks lived in ATL, we flew out of there on numerous occasions in cold damp weather, only to arrive in DEN to sunshine and warmer temps than what we left. This usually happened at Christmas, T-Giving, or spring break. Doesn't happen now that they are in Tally. That couple hundred miles makes a big difference.
    I'd take commuting at 630 am in Tallahassee or Georgia over commuting in Denver at 630 am when it's zero degrees and dark.

    What part of Tallahassee are they in?

  10. #10
    slow
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    Quote Originally Posted by athalliah
    I'd take commuting at 630 am in Tallahassee or Georgia over commuting in Denver at 630 am when it's zero degrees and dark.
    It's a dry cold, but good point.

    Quote Originally Posted by athalliah
    What part of Tallahassee are they in?
    Couple of miles NW of FSU

  11. #11
    Rolling
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    Gas prices are too cheap to ride a bike to work anymore!



    Drive and eat lots of heavy breakfasts.....

  12. #12
    Heads up Flyboy!!
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    Check out www.kbcyclewerks.com ....losts of great clothing at a huge discount...got some windstopper stuff...windstopper jersey/jackets on sale for 49.00...that is water and wind proof. also ordered some knickers and a vest...may be getting some more stuff from them too. Nice people. Friendly customer service.

    Also check out Performance Bike...Have had the Sirccoco Jacket for two years...can ride at 30 degrees with just a short sleeved base layer under it and have been toasty in 35degrees raining and windy.rThey are on sale now for around $60. Also the Performance Sirccoco Gloves on on sale and I have a pair ...usually wear them between 25-40 degrees and feel ok...colder I go with glove liners in them.

    One more thing...get a pair of Performance shoe covers. By far the best on the market for mountain biking and cheaper then most. Neoprene outside, fleece inside, rubber bottoms...ridden in 20 degree weather with toastie toes. Usually up a size. I wear a size 46(US 12) and get the 13's to fit over my shoes. Best investment at 30.00. Have had a pair to last me three seasons before. Just bought my second pair this year.

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