My predicament... pedals shoes etc- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    My predicament... pedals shoes etc

    So... I've gotten into some longer type trail rides recently, and decided to get some clipless pedals (wellgo / sette shoe combo off pricepoint). These seemed really fun for a bit on Desert Classic and stuff that I can ride 100 % of the time without worry, I had one minor fall at a standstill with nothing too bad coming out of it. I ended up getting some canal miles in and the clipless seemed reall good. I really enjoyed the power I got on clipless which I have a hard time replicating with the platform / shoe combo I was using before (Nike 6.0 and atomic lab bmx pedals)

    So, yesterday going up a switch back / stair at t100 I tipped over and landed on a rock that looked like a razor blade. Sliced my shin down to the bone, and now I am totally sketch on clipping anything technical and even down hill now. With flats I can ride on the edge much easier and bail out into a situation where I can land half the time..

    I know this probably isn't the forum for it, but I pose most my questions in the AZ forum as not everyone knows about the riding here.

    One major problem I have with my current platform / bmx pedals would have to be their bulkiness. I am constantly scraping them on rocks from underneath the pedals and on the sides. Right now I am leaning towards finding a lower profile pedal with better grip than the one I have now.

    I have also read a lot about the 5.10s and was wondering just how much better they are than the nike 6.0 shoes.

    Thanks ahead of time for reading if you got this far lol

  2. #2
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    You'll grow more comfortable with Clipless as you use them more..

  3. #3
    Meatbomb
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    if your shins survive that is ...



    there are pedals that offer a flat option on one side. I can't remember the name though.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    if your shins survive that is ...



    there are pedals that offer a flat option on one side. I can't remember the name though.
    Forte Campus pedals from Performance Bike are one option.

  5. #5
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    When I did my first few trail rides years ago (before getting away from MTB and now back into the again) I started out with clipless pedals. I had the Crank Bros Candy C pedal and SIDI dominator shoe. I fell a few times all because I couldnt get out of the pedals...I was annoyed to say the least. I went into Perfomance Bike and told them my issue and asked for a good flat pedal. The guy there talked me out of switching away from clipless. Instead he recommended that I use the Shimano SPD pedals since they are adjustable so I could make it easy to get out of them until I learned to get use to them and then tighten them up as I needed. They worked out GREAT! With those pedals I never had a crash because I couldnt get out of the clip. I just got a new mt bike after not riding at all for many years. My bike came with the Crank Bros pedals...I took them off at the store and got a set of SPD Shimano pedals again. I am not a experienced MTB rider at all...I have only ridden a handful of somewhat technical trails and a bunch of street or basic flat trail riding. BUT from my little experience this is what I did and would recommend trying.

  6. #6
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    I picked up a set of Crank Brothers Smartys (Called Candys now) from Chainlove last week. They have a small platform that I like, they also make one with a slightly larger platform, called Acid, that you can still easily clip into.

    www.crankbrothers.com

  7. #7
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    practice, and wear armor if you are worried. spds are adjustable, which is nice, but you will pop out of them unless you tighten them down. spds are fine for XC, but imo suck for tech riding since they are imo less predictable. they are also far more complicated than Times for cleaning. Times are harder initially than spds, but after riding spds for years it took all of 2 rides til i was good with them. I have no issues getting out on gnarly stuff, just takes practice.

    i bought 5.10s, and they are as good as everyone said. when i swapped from my POS wellgos to Azonic 420 pedals its also really helped. but like everyone told me when my shin was burger meat from the flats, practice is required.
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  8. #8
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    I feel your pain; I think we’ve all been there before. It takes some time.

    As someone else said, try to find some pedals that you can adjust. I ride clipped in with very little tension in them, I like knowing I can get out on the 1st try. I have some Ritchey SPD pedals, sorry don’t know the model. I bought them because they were light weight.

    Again, we all have had those tip overs. I had mine at BCT that required stitches on my shin. I blame my poor slow rolling balance and my camelback, not my pedals.

    Tiff

  9. #9
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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    Shimano dx m647's pedals along with the DX shoes. Just did the bootleg race in these and loved them, use them for south runs too. I do switch over to lighter/breathable shoes though when doing xc but still use these pedals.
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  10. #10
    How do I do that?
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    I started mountian biking last June after buying my bike and went straight to platforms. I pretty much ripped out half of the screw in studs from my Tioga flats smacking into every rock I passed by while out on the PMP. My shins weren't too happy with me either.

    Anyway, I wore ordinary NB sneakers for the first 5 months of riding and always had a desire to go clipless except I have one lifelong problem. My feet don't fit into anything! I've tried on several SPD shoes but none of them could fit my wide, flat feet which even has wonderful bunion on the right foot. After sending pairs of Lake shoes back and forth from their headquarters(since no local stores carry the 'Wide" sizes), I finally settled on a $170 pair of Lakes as they seem to fit ok while walking around my house. Placed them in my shoe stretcher, swapped over the ped's to M520's and I was off to the PMP.

    I never fell that day but I was nervous to say the least since I was still learning the sport to begin with. After about two hours though, the pain from my feet from the improper fit was overwhelming and just crippling. I tried to fit arches, I tried to stretch them out more but I just couldn't use 'em. After spending close to $300 for the shoes, pedals and the shipping back and forth, I put them away and bought a pair of 5.10 Sam Hill II's.

    Luckily since these 5.10's are pretty wide, my feet actually fit after a weeks worth of stretching, and they kind of work with the arches I placed in them. Now I don't know anything about Nike 6.0's, but I could tell you that the 5.10's are very very grippy. I'm not sure if it's all that great to have so much grip sometimes as I often get annoyed with the difficulty I have trying to make quick small adjustments of my feet on the flats but it's just something I have to get used to. They do definitely work better then my NB sneakers and I do love the stiffer soles and bulletproof build. The bulk helps guard my toes from some heavy impacts too.

    As for the pedal strikes, I seem to have learned how to avoid them better as I am more mindful of my pedal stroke as I pass obstacles that I know I will hit. It's annoying at times as I would like to power on through certain sections but it works for me.

    As for your situation Danky, I would try to keep at it with the clipless and see if you can get comfortable with it. From what I hear and read, the benefits seem to outweigh the learning curve once you get used to them. 417 had a good tip with the SPD's though. I had mine adjusted at the lowest tension and it was very easy to unclip, I just wish I could find a pair of SPD shoes that fit my screwed up feet so I can actually see what it's really like to ride clipless

    Sorry to hear about your shin and I'm sure the fear of a repeat will linger in your head during the learning curve. I'd say stick with some mellower trails while you gain more confidence with them.

    Good luck!

    Wait a minute, did I add anything positive to this thread or just rant about my [email protected]$#^D up feet?....*sigh*


    -Chris

  11. #11
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    Shimano M-647's with SH-56 Cleats!!

    The M-647 is a great pedal, and if you want to get out even easier, use the SH-56 Multi-Release cleat. You will get the power you need to power up rocky stair steps, and be able to put a foot down just as easy as a platform pedal.

    I was a very slow convert to clipless, but this setup is totally intuitive.

  12. #12
    oh Lucky me
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    i think you just ranted about your f'ed up feet...but thats ok..


    i have some CB smarty's? and Forte MTB shoes. when i first started riding on a HT i ran flats, but when i got on my current FS i switched. i was stupid nervous about running them, and after a few miles of street riding playing with getting in and out of them, i took them to the trail. the thing i like(d) (past tense) about the CB's were they were so loose that if i kept my feet straight i would stay in, but the slightest turn i would come out (that was okay with me as i was just getting used to them). now i would like something more adjustable that i can really tighten down into.

    you might go that route until you get used to clipping in and out to build confidence. They are pretty cheap at $40 bucks from performance.
    ...Dying is the easy part, its living that's the challenge...

  13. #13
    Meatbomb
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    While we are on pedal rants


    I have a unique predicament. A couple years ago I severely broke my left leg and now have what is called a Tibia Nail and 4 screws in it (basically a rod from my knee to my ankle down the middle of my tibia). A few weeks after the surgeries I took the boot off one night while chillin' and realized they had put my foot back on at an angle (toes point out). I called the doc the next day and he said they put it back on at an 11* angle to help prevent arthritis from developing...


    what does this have to do with pedals you ask? I can't unclip my left foot while riding/seated, only my right. I have to come to a complete stop and lean forward to get the angle needed to unclip my left. sometimes my heel even smacks the frame as I pedal .... This requires a lot of planning ahead when i ride and a few scars on my left side from flopping over when I could not get it un clipped..


    with that said... Candy pedals are cheap for a reason.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    While we are on pedal rants


    I have a unique predicament. A couple years ago I severely broke my left leg and now have what is called a Tibia Nail and 4 screws in it (basically a rod from my knee to my ankle down the middle of my tibia). A few weeks after the surgeries I took the boot off one night while chillin' and realized they had put my foot back on at an angle (toes point out). I called the doc the next day and he said they put it back on at an 11* angle to help prevent arthritis from developing...


    what does this have to do with pedals you ask? I can't unclip my left foot while riding/seated, only my right. I have to come to a complete stop and lean forward to get the angle needed to unclip my left. sometimes my heel even smacks the frame as I pedal .... This requires a lot of planning ahead when i ride and a few scars on my left side from flopping over when I could not get it un clipped..


    with that said... Candy pedals are cheap for a reason.
    If you use the SH-56 Multi release cleat, you can release your foot without having to twist to a set point to release. Might be just what you need.

  15. #15
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    I rode my entire MTB life with clipless -- Times are my personal favorite BTW -- but swapped to flats this past summer. After a steep learning curve and some hamburgered shins, I totally love riding flats. Even on my SS.

    The 5.10s are worth the coin. And skinny pedals -- Wah-Wahs, Deitys, etc. -- help, too.

  16. #16
    Meatbomb
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    If you use the SH-56 Multi release cleat, you can release your foot without having to twist to a set point to release. Might be just what you need.

    I'll have to research those .. thanks.

  17. #17
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    I tried Time pedals a few months ago, but I ended up switching to platforms/5.10's. They're great for my all mountain bike, but I'm thinking of switching back to clipless on my SS 29er. Recently I rode with someone using Speedplay pedals, and they looked like a good product, really easy to get out of and plenty of float. Anyone have any experience with these? Pros/cons?

  18. #18
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    I had Time Attacks on my fixed gear road bike for years. Very comfortable on them and never had any problems on the street.

    Got my first mountain bike a little over a year ago and threw the Times on it because I figured I was used to them and there would be no problem. 2 months of feeling uncomfortable, falling when climbing the technical stuff, and just all around not having fun lead me to ditch the clipless.

    Bought myself a pair of 5.10s and Syncros Meathooks based on the recommendations of the guys at Cactus and I have never looked back. I have so much more fun and am way more comfortable. I am probably less efficient, but I don't care because I feel more confident and have more fun.

    I think everyone should ride the pedals that let them have a good time, since that is what its all about.

    With that said, if you do go with flats, you have to spend the money on the 5.10s and get a decent set of thin pedals. Without the shoes every flat pedal will seem slick and dangerous. A thick pedal will increase pedal strike. I now run Wah Wahs and much prefer them over the thicker Syncros.

    Finally, in regards to the "hamburger shin" concerns, I have never slipped off my pedals while riding and hit my shins. Coming down Geronimo, Holbert, 24th St., etc. has never been a problem. I attribute this to the right shoes with the right pedals. The only time I have ever cut a shin on a pedal is while hiking up.

    Good luck.
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  19. #19
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    I got the SH-56 Multi release cleat after having ACL surgery and they helped restore some confidence. They're real easy to get out of.

    I do like my clipless for XC type rides but prefer my flats for DH. I haven't tried the 5.10s but it sounds like I need to.

  20. #20
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    Thanks for all the posts...

    I will try and back out the tension on the cleats and give them a couple more tries, but am in the meantime gonna keep riding the flats.

    It looks like the 5.10 shoe is pretty gnarly, and probably a huge upgrade over the 6.0... I guess if no one else can confirm this I'll let you know after I stop by cactus...

    In the meantime... what pedals should I be looking out for to go along with the 5.10s? The wah wah looks like a good profile to me, any advice?

  21. #21
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by DankyCass
    Thanks for all the posts...

    I will try and back out the tension on the cleats and give them a couple more tries, but am in the meantime gonna keep riding the flats.

    It looks like the 5.10 shoe is pretty gnarly, and probably a huge upgrade over the 6.0... I guess if no one else can confirm this I'll let you know after I stop by cactus...

    In the meantime... what pedals should I be looking out for to go along with the 5.10s? The wah wah looks like a good profile to me, any advice?
    here young grasshoppa i suggest you search our good forum for "5.10". it will open the door to much knowledge. i got my Remy's and 420s for $150, waiting for sales.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DankyCass
    Thanks for all the posts...

    I will try and back out the tension on the cleats and give them a couple more tries, but am in the meantime gonna keep riding the flats.

    It looks like the 5.10 shoe is pretty gnarly, and probably a huge upgrade over the 6.0... I guess if no one else can confirm this I'll let you know after I stop by cactus...

    In the meantime... what pedals should I be looking out for to go along with the 5.10s? The wah wah looks like a good profile to me, any advice?
    I'm running the wah wah/5.10 combo and have nothing but good things to say about them (both the pedals and the shoes). As far as the 5.10's go, I haven't tried the Nike shoes you're using, but I've tried a couple different skate shoes - some Van's and some World Industries - and they didn't compare to the 5.10's at all, imo.

  23. #23
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    I'm in the severe minority... (although I have run flat pedals my whole life as a bmxican) 5.10's increased the pedal grip but not by much over good bmx shoes. There of course are some big differences in models of Etnies, Van's etc.. you can usually tell by looking at the sole.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant
    I rode my entire MTB life with clipless -- Times are my personal favorite BTW -- but swapped to flats this past summer. After a steep learning curve and some hamburgered shins, I totally love riding flats. Even on my SS.

    The 5.10s are worth the coin. And skinny pedals -- Wah-Wahs, Deitys, etc. -- help, too.
    Yikes Phil, that sounds terrible.

    I'd second platforms. I still ride clipless on my SS, just because I need all the help on the uphills. But I recently went to platforms (5.10s and WahWahs) on my big bike, and I'll never go back to clips. Unless you *must* ride clipless, might want to look at this.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  25. #25
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    Ive got 2 pair of 5/10 shoes to sell. Mens 10 and 8.5. $40 per pair. Used but very good condition.

  26. #26
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    Went into Cactus and got sold on the 5.10s and the Azonic 420 pedals...(where do they come up with these names)

    Put on the pedals first and toyed around in my nike 6.0s while I still had them on and noticed some pretty nice grip from that combo... After slapping on the 5.10s tho it was really an entirely different experience. They are so f'n grippy... you gotta get your foot in the right position first time you set it on cuz you can't even scoot your foot around to adjust .

    Oh yah and the ano blue 420 pedals look ridiculously cool I'll have to get some pics here when I find my camera

  27. #27
    Got a suspension fork
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    What you ride makes a difference in my opinion. As a trail rider I don't want anything but clipless, only Speedplay pedals for me MTB and road. But if you get into the gnar I can see where a platform setup would reign supreme.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  28. #28
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    DankyCass,

    I got a set of shimano m647 set to the loosest setting, a pair of roach/race face knee/shin guards, and some 661 skate style SPDs with the standard cleat. I can unclip at any point, and haven't fallen over yet.

    I pretty much wear the knee/shin guards every ride, and it gives me the confidence to try to pedal up/go down all sorts of things.

    Also, when i'm descending i like the feeling of being clipped in. However, good flats w/ some sticky rubber might also do this.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by cramey
    DankyCass,

    I got a set of shimano m647 set to the loosest setting, a pair of roach/race face knee/shin guards, and some 661 skate style SPDs with the standard cleat. I can unclip at any point, and haven't fallen over yet.

    I pretty much wear the knee/shin guards every ride, and it gives me the confidence to try to pedal up/go down all sorts of things.

    Also, when i'm descending i like the feeling of being clipped in. However, good flats w/ some sticky rubber might also do this.
    I went from old fashioned toe clips to flats, and I had trouble with power moves up rocky stair steps, even with 5/10 shoes.

    The downhills were fine, my feet never came off there, although flats do tend to hit things more because of their size.

    For me, the M647 is close to perfection.

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