Mountain Bike Shoes

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  • 07-24-2006
    harryzhong
    Mountain Bike Shoes
    Hello All

    I'm new to mountain biking, started this past winter. I do mostly cross country stuff here around the bay area.

    I was wondering if there was a good shoe out there that was stiff with good power transfer but wasn't a clipless solution. I want to be able to instantly jump off, but also want efficient pedaling for those grueling uphills. Is this an impossible combination?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    Harry
  • 07-24-2006
    damion
    Are you using flat pedals?
    If so, try some of the trail type cycling shoes from Specialized and Cannondale. They are not race shoes, but more like trail runner/hiking shoes with a gummy sole, a semi-stiff sole and the tracks for adding cleats if you decide to upgrade pedals.
  • 07-25-2006
    harryzhong
    I am, they'r generic flats with a cage on it.

    I will look through some shoes, but there seem to be a lot, are there any specific models you recommend? If not, thanks!

    Harry
  • 07-25-2006
    damion
    It really depends on your budget.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by harryzhong
    I am, they'r generic flats with a cage on it.

    I will look through some shoes, but there seem to be a lot, are there any specific models you recommend? If not, thanks!

    Harry

    You really need to try on a few pair to get a good fit. Try Specialized new line, and the MC series from Cannondale. Your fierst pairs of cycling shoes can not be ordered mailorder, as there is no way to get a good fit without knowing what you want.

    Personally, I use SIDI, but they are race shoes. Spendy, but nobody, and I mean NOBODY makes shoes like Italiano's do.
  • 07-25-2006
    perttime
    Try before you buy.
    Maybe I am just fussy about shoes but it seems to be common for me to walk into a shop looking for shoes, and come out after not finding one pair that I like.

    Many also use skateboard style shoes for riding but they usually have no way to convert to clipless.
  • 07-25-2006
    harryzhong
    thanks guys
    I'll check out those sources and maybe find a shop to try some on.
  • 07-25-2006
    skygod74
    I use Five Ten impact shoes with the stealth rubber and Speedplay Drillium pedals on my XC bike. It *is* the closest thing to being clipped in. I like it. :thumbsup:
  • 07-25-2006
    harryzhong
    impacts eh?
    do the impacts have good stiffness? I know they are awesome freeride shoes, but do they work as well on XC?
  • 07-26-2006
    HTail
    Shimano
    I started out like you, thinking I wanted a shoe more versatile than a full-on dedicated bike shoe. Well, 4 pairs later, I'm using a dedicated mtn bike race style shoe because they transfer power better (stiff), have a good hiking cleat and fit snug. The hike-bike shoes are too flexy, which lends themselves to easier hiking, but the reality is that you're on your bike pedaling more than hiking.

    If you do plan to do both- hike and bike, it's probably a good idea then to have a hybrid shoe and compromise some pedaling performance for versatility.
  • 07-26-2006
    harryzhong
    what do you think about these?
  • 07-26-2006
    glenk
    They look pretty good.

    A good nub pattern on the sole that should work well with platforms. (using normal MTB shoes with platforms doesn't work that well in my experience)
    A velcro strap that keeps your shoe laces from flying loose at the wrong time.
    Gray/black outer that doesn't show stains as bad as beige suede will.

    Now find a pair for me on sale!
  • 07-26-2006
    harryzhong
    I like them too
    I can't seem to find anyplace other than specialized that sells them. There are a few, but not that much cheaper. Hehe.

    Harry
  • 07-26-2006
    HTail
    No laces
    Sorry to be stubborn, but laces do not work as well as velcro straps. It's faster and easier to get the shoe snug with straps than laces, plus you don't have to worry about laces getting caught in the chain or soaked when wet/muddy. My second pair of shoes had this same combination of laces and one velcro strap- too much trouble.

    Anyways, I hope you find the shoe that works best for you. Can always upgrade to something as your needs change. Maybe see you on the trails here in the south bay!
  • 07-26-2006
    harryzhong
    That makes sense. I'll try to look for some all velcro ones.

    Where do you bike in the south bay?
  • 07-26-2006
    glenk
    No laces would be ideal but for some reason, manufacturers use laces and a single strap in most cases, or just laces.

    I would think that a single strap is better than laces alone.
    How about this one:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/129...duro-Shoes.htm

    The Adidas Hematoma is the only shoe I've found so far with straps only.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/139...toma-Shoes.htm

    Southbay rides:

    Fremont Older, Alum Rock Park, Saratoga Gap. Montebello Preserve are a few.
  • 07-26-2006
    skygod74
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by harryzhong
    do the impacts have good stiffness? I know they are awesome freeride shoes, but do they work as well on XC?

    I use them for XC riding and think they're pretty damn grippy. In the two crashes I've had I was able to bail without the complications of getting unclipped, thrown out of my shoes, etc. :)
  • 07-26-2006
    Kaba Klaus
    In my humble opinion you should upgrade to clipless. Instant hoping of and best possible power power transmission is a contradiction.

    Most clipless pedals allow to adjust the spring. So you can choose from easy release to pretty tight.You'll be surprised how fast you get out of clipless pedals. You'll also be surprised how much you can ride once you believe you can do it. Being prepared to hop of makes you do just that.

    Get clipless pedals and a book on standard MTB riding technique.

    Regarding shoes: I bought a pair of Shimano M something 5 years ago. Cost 45$. They served me well on 3 long tours in the Alps (yep we had to push the bikes a few times) and an endless string of comutes, weekend and evening rides. These days I also pedal a road bike with them.

    Most important attribute: They fit.
  • 07-26-2006
    dankilling
    Why would you run toe straps if you want to jump off and run 'instantly?' Kind of a contradiction, isnt it? Clipless will release at a number of angles, not just striaght back like a cage/strap solution, so your chances of coming out 'instantly' are greater with a good set of clipless than with a strap/cage solution- and as a bonus, your selection of shoes improves dramatically.
  • 07-26-2006
    harryzhong
    that makes sense
    Sounds good. I think I will probaly end up getting clipless/platform pedals for my road bike since I commute on campus with that as well.

    As for the mountain, I'm thinking some Malet C's would be a good start?
  • 07-27-2006
    HTail
    Shimano 524
    On my 'other' bike which I use to run errands on the street and as a backup mtn bike, I use Shimano 524's which have clipless SPD on one side and a platform on the other. This is an ideal pedal for you because the platform side is all platform, no cleat protruding out to interfer with regular shoes (if I'm not mistaken, Candy's still have the egg beater cleat sticking up on both sides).
  • 07-27-2006
    harryzhong
    just ordered similiar ones off ebay
    I found some generic spd/platform pedals that look similar to the shimano ones. We'll see how they work out.

    Now I just need a good beginner shoe, I was looking at the Shimano M038 or Specialized BG Taho, as they are both around 60-70, pretty cheap.