Mountain bike armor, need some updated info- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mountain bike armor, need some updated info

    Hi all, My fiance recently purchased her first mountain bike. We went for our first ride the other day, and she was pretty nervous about falling. I assured her that will go away in time, to a point at least, but she was asking me about armor anyway, and I'm all for her getting some, I'd hate for her to get hurt. I spent some time searching the Women's Lounge for info, and the only products I found that were good for XC were made by Corerat, which is no longer in business. So I'm looking for some woman specific armor that's sold currently. She asked me what the most common injuries mountain biking are, I said shoulder injuries are common, and leg injuries, but I didn't know anymore details. So info on what armor is the most important would be appreciated as well.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Getting my wife to wear armour was a gret idea, she became more relaxed, therfore stopped crashing so much. just wish it hadn't involved a helicopter ride to a hospital to covnince.

    I am also struggling on getting jacket armour to fit as she is skinny, so any tips would be nice. Dainese stuff is aimed at the more slender person, so may be a good start.

    Specialised body geometry have been good for gloves.
    as womens legs tend to be more slender, don't rule out kids pads for knee and elbow.

    I have to stress a good helmet, the fit is paramount. If the Met parachute fits that is a light helmet with a lot of protection.

    hope that helps

  3. #3
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    You might just start with knees and elbows. A full pressure suit might be overkill for XC, and knees/arms would certainly cover the main areas. I think for beginners, that's more than enough. Shoulder injuries, based on what I've seen, occur more in high speed/technical situations.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    You might just start with knees and elbows. A full pressure suit might be overkill for XC, and knees/arms would certainly cover the main areas. I think for beginners, that's more than enough. Shoulder injuries, based on what I've seen, occur more in high speed/technical situations.
    Yeah, I was planning on suggesting shins and knees, I wasn't sure about elbows. She's mostly concerned with anything that will keep her out of work, she's a nurse. So, suggestions? She's medium built, doesn't need anything too heavy duty and we only ride XC.

  5. #5
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    Body armour ideas

    I love the Crash Pads, shorts and longies. http://www.crash-pads.com/shop/Mount...e-Short/3.html My hips are so happy not to be always bruised up. The longies, good for winter riding, have a light shin support and look kinda sexy too. For arms and elbows I use the old Sette Strikes, now discontinued. McDavid's are a close second. These go on easy and don't seem like overkill. Full fingered, ventilated gloves are essential. Some people like to make fun, but I sure bleed less than they do AND I spend less down time being injured. I also try stuff that I might otherwise walk on.

    Last summer, after a badly broken nose and face stitches, I decided I would like to keep my teeth and switched to a MET parachute, purchased from UK for $150. It is a regular vented cycling helmet with a minimal, little face piece that is cool and lets me eat and drink etc. http://www.totalcycling.com/index.ph...urrency&id=USD

    My best injury protection has been to improve my overall balance by sitting on a big balance ball, feet up, and practicing little circles with my hips, all while watching tv. It has taught me to have better balance on the bike and to quick-correct when in the past I would have crashed. I used to think you would steer with the handlebars and began to realize it's a core and hip controlled thing. So, the ball helps me connect that way.

    Happy Riding.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straz85
    So I'm looking for some woman specific armor that's sold currently. ... So info on what armor is the most important would be appreciated as well.
    Knees/shins and elbows. They're not WSD, but I like my sixsixones, although they don't seem to make the set that I have any more (similar to the 2X4 and 4X4.)

    Other recommendation: Take a judo class & learn how to roll out of a fall.

    gabrielle
    Quote Originally Posted by Impy
    just plain unfriendly and maladjusted.
    "Yes, honey: I do love this bike more than I love you."

  7. #7
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    if it's just XC, i don't think she needs armor. i just feel like they get in the way and restrict movement. i think the best thing to do is to build up her confidence by riding on the road and getting her stronger. then take her to beginner trails. cuz boyfriends and husbands often take their significant other to trails that are just too hard for a beginner. encourage her to pedal instead of braking a lot. most time beginners are going too slow and that's why they feel like they are falling. then their first reaction is to use their front brake. so force her to keep her butt in behind her seat. in my opinion, fitness and confidence is the way to start. find her a women's group to ride with. and if she absolutely has to have armor, i say go with bmx/motocross jersey and pants. they are thicker and more rugged.

  8. #8
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    Like pangster said most of my crashes when I started out were cause I would chicken out in the middle of something and hit the brakes. Just have to learn to roll through it. The 661 veggie knee pads are soft, comfortable and have saved my knees many times. Never hurt my elbow or felt a need for elbow pads. My shoulder is another story and I would love to find some type of lightweight shoulder pads. 661 has just come out with subgear which should serve the purpose. Just wish it didnt have the pads in the front.
    Check it out at http://www.pinkbike.com/news/661-subgear-2010.html There are 3 versions, short sleeve, long sleeve and sleeveless

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pangster
    if it's just XC, i don't think she needs armor. i just feel like they get in the way and restrict movement. i think the best thing to do is to build up her confidence by riding on the road and getting her stronger. then take her to beginner trails. cuz boyfriends and husbands often take their significant other to trails that are just too hard for a beginner. encourage her to pedal instead of braking a lot. most time beginners are going too slow and that's why they feel like they are falling. then their first reaction is to use their front brake. so force her to keep her butt in behind her seat. in my opinion, fitness and confidence is the way to start. find her a women's group to ride with. and if she absolutely has to have armor, i say go with bmx/motocross jersey and pants. they are thicker and more rugged.
    This is the time where you develop all of these horrible habits (from advice from well intentioned people...)

    You DO want to use your front brake - it's horrible to hear people say "I was told to never use the front brake or I'll endo". Your front brake is your friend when you know how to use it! And you don't want to be hanging off the back end of the bike either, or you won't have any weight on your front tire and it's going to wash out - you only want to adjust your body position enough to match the angle of the terrain. But this is a delicate balance and the important thing is that you need to learn to use your front brake with some finesse, not just panic grabbing a handful of brakes. And most people can't learn that when you just throw them into a situation where they are scared to death...

    Send her to a skills clinic! They pay huge dividends in the long run.

  10. #10
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    Terrific idea

    Wow, I'm on it. I'll take out the front foam, wear a tank top over, and try to stay upright. Maybe sew some bling on the sleeves! Thanks for sharing this.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by connie
    This is the time where you develop all of these horrible habits (from advice from well intentioned people...)

    You DO want to use your front brake - it's horrible to hear people say "I was told to never use the front brake or I'll endo". Your front brake is your friend when you know how to use it! And you don't want to be hanging off the back end of the bike either, or you won't have any weight on your front tire and it's going to wash out - you only want to adjust your body position enough to match the angle of the terrain. But this is a delicate balance and the important thing is that you need to learn to use your front brake with some finesse, not just panic grabbing a handful of brakes. And most people can't learn that when you just throw them into a situation where they are scared to death...

    Send her to a skills clinic! They pay huge dividends in the long run.
    i should have said use too much front brakes or all front brake.

    stripes is right. send her to a skills clinic. i'm not sure where you're at. there's women's mountain biking groups everywhere. i know my team is having a women's skill clinic in march.

  12. #12
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    Rollin'

    Quote Originally Posted by gabrielle

    Other recommendation: Take a judo class & learn how to roll out of a fall.

    gabrielle
    Just watch out if you start taking Judo or Aikido and spend more time on the mat than on your bike.
    And from experience, anything that teaches you to fall gracefully is good.. just remember that there's a hunk of metal between your legs and pedals.

    Good thread!

  13. #13
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    If you have seen me judo you would not mention the word gracefull.

    more lumbering beast.

    I have managed to modify my motion in the air to land in a roll more than once. So learning to fall is good, no idea how to be graceful though

  14. #14
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    I wear light duty hard shell knee pads. The shell is key. I'm not an aggressive rider, but I do fall down. All it took was one good whack on a rock to make me a believer. I wore Core Rats for years, but can't find replacements. Just got a pair of LizardSkins, which are a little more substantial, but the lightest I could find. If a bit of armor gives her more confidence, then by all means get knee and elbow pads. If she's riding platform pedals, shin pads might be a good idea too.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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