moisture wicking clothing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    moisture wicking clothing

    I was looking at purchasin some moisture wicking clothing for trail rides and singletrack rides. i am no hard core rider but as a clyde "223"pounds i work up a sweat so are these clothes and socks worth the extra money or regular clothing just as good.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Yes, the wicking fabrics are worth it. Basically stay away from cotton as it will make you colder when it is wet and also chafes more.

    There is a huge selection of clothing made from "tech" fabrics and they do not have to be expensive. The natural tech fabric (wool) is great, too.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockymountainelement50
    I was looking at purchasin some moisture wicking clothing for trail rides and singletrack rides. i am no hard core rider but as a clyde "223"pounds i work up a sweat so are these clothes and socks worth the extra money or regular clothing just as good.
    Look at the roadies. They purchase lycra beause it wicks, as opposed to wool. I do all my biking, MTB and Road, in tech fabrics - Louis Garneau/Pearl Izumi/etc jerseys, and lycra PI et cetera shorts. There's a real difference. I simply get cooked when I MTB in baggies.
    Plus, the tech materials often whick best when as lycra, which has an advantage in that when you try and move around the saddle, lycra gets caught much less often than baggies.
    -estone2

  4. #4
    Crunchatize me Capn'
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    another advantage of wicking fabrics...

    if you commute the clothes will dry by the time you get off of work or whatever. Target, Wal-Mart, Kohl's etc. all have decent wicking tops so you don't have to get expensive jerseys if you don't want. For shorts I wear lycra unless I'm just piddling around my neighborhood. I try to buy the best shorts I can afford but they are a personal choice and you just have to try some until you find ones that are comfortable for you.

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by estone2
    Look at the roadies. They purchase lycra beause it wicks, as opposed to wool. I do all my biking, MTB and Road, in tech fabrics - Louis Garneau/Pearl Izumi/etc jerseys, and lycra PI et cetera shorts. There's a real difference. I simply get cooked when I MTB in baggies.
    Plus, the tech materials often whick best when as lycra, which has an advantage in that when you try and move around the saddle, lycra gets caught much less often than baggies.
    -estone2
    Ummm...Lycra by itself does not wick nor do most nylon/Lycra blend fabrics. They do dry quickly because they are non-absorbant.

    Wool does wick and insulate when wet. It just does not dry as quickly as the synthetic wicking fabrics. The synthetics also cost less, are easier to care for, easier to put graphics on and hold their shape better.

    Wool is still an outstanding performance fabric and I find it to be much more comfortable in most cases. That said I still wear both and layer using both. I have a thin wool undershirt that works better than any synthetic one I have worn - hot or cold weather.
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  6. #6
    Wizard of the Trail
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    Look at wallyworld for the starter dristar shirts. They work great and dry fast.
    There is no charge for awesomeness......or attractiveness.

    Good rep does not wash out the bad, nor the bad the good.

  7. #7

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    Cotton is really the worst fabric for outdoor activities. It takes forever to dry out. When wet, it blocks cooling airflow to your body. Wet cotton seems to have a knack for making you hotter when it is hot and colder when it is cold. Synthetic fabrics dry quick and still flow some air when wet. The only real downside to synthetics is the way they encourage bacteria growth (they get smelly).

    For keeping covered and as cool as possible, I like the Performance Elite Long Sleeve Jersey
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...egory_ID=1111#

  8. #8
    dirty trail dog
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geist262
    Look at wallyworld for the starter dristar shirts. They work great and dry fast.
    Seconded. I have 2 of these and they work very well. They're a bit thicker (by a very tiny amount) than the high-dollar stuff from Nike, but for 9 bucks a pop, you can't beat it. And they actually make sizes that fit us fat boys.
    yep...

  9. #9
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    I wear baggie MTB shorts (I don't feel like shaving my legs for lycra) and tops from Target. The Target C9 tops are CHEAP and work great out on the trails. If it gets ripped from a crash, no big deal. I picked up a light grey top the other day for $2.98 from the clearance section.

    BTW, I only wear wool socks. They have been extremely comfortable in the summer and winter.

  10. #10
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    My vote goes to Patagonia Silkweight clothing

  11. #11
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    One suggestion...

    Coolmax socks and shirts for summer riding.
    Don

  12. #12
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    I'd have to say as a person who sweats PROFUSELY, wicking material has really changed my athletic apparel life. I really enjoy under armour, but find it way too expensive. the trick to getting the good stuff (nike dri fit, adidas clima cool, etc.) is buying it in the off season. right now you can get SUPER cheap dri fit long sleeves from different sports stores clearance racks. No good to me because where i live LS are pretty much worthless 360 days outta the year (SA, TX). I really like Nike and Adidas personally, IMHO i think the extra 10 bucks (as opposed to some 10 dollar kmart or target brand) is well worth it. the trick is to shop around, sorry for the long post

  13. #13
    JORBA: Six Mile Run
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    True.....

    Quote Originally Posted by dcairns
    The only real downside to synthetics is the way they encourage bacteria growth (they get smelly).

    How true. Anyone know a way to keep this in check?

  14. #14
    dirty trail dog
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wobbegong
    How true. Anyone know a way to keep this in check?
    Wash them after each ride.
    yep...

  15. #15
    Just hit it with speed
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    Quick Wick Gear love

    Quote Originally Posted by DP1112
    I'd have to say as a person who sweats PROFUSELY, wicking material has really changed my athletic apparel life. I really enjoy under armour, but find it way too expensive. the trick to getting the good stuff (nike dri fit, adidas clima cool, etc.) is buying it in the off season. right now you can get SUPER cheap dri fit long sleeves from different sports stores clearance racks. No good to me because where i live LS are pretty much worthless 360 days outta the year (SA, TX). I really like Nike and Adidas personally, IMHO i think the extra 10 bucks (as opposed to some 10 dollar kmart or target brand) is well worth it. the trick is to shop around, sorry for the long post
    I couldn't agree with you more I've begun wearing alot of my quick wick clothing on other occasions where I sweat alot not just biking and the gym.

    I have found some amazing deals at places you would never expect, such as TJ Max, Marshalls and so forth. I realize that these places are like mass outlets for off clothing but I have found and bought Reebok(whatever there quick wick stuff is), Russell, Under Armor (but I only once found my size), Nike driFit, and Adidas. The sizing is definitely off on some of them but it is the material and fit that counts. Personally wearing a mens extra large or small(I'm a medium) doesn't bother me much, since its the material that counts. I have paid outrageous prices for these shirts at these places and it seems the sweet spot for this gear at these outlets is 9.99 to 11.99 which is alot better than the 25-45 they charge for underarmor. I have actually found underarmor to make me too cool sometimes and actually to the point of being cold, when you get really really sweaty and than for instance begin to run. However all of my quick wick tees (My favorite I did pay full price for, is a Patagonia Capilene) perform awesome and just breath without letting me overheat.

  16. #16
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    Merino Wool is all I wear.
    Expensive, but definitely worth it.
    Check out Ibex. http://www.ibexwear.com/S06/Products...&Category=1042
    Lenny

  17. #17

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    Synthetic fabrics will dry out about 4 times faster than cotton. Cycling specific socks are also much cooler. If you wear cycling specific shoes avoid using normal cotton socks. They are too thick. Measure them them with cycling socks on or you will likely end up with a size too large.

    Quote Originally Posted by dcairns
    The only real downside to synthetics is the way they encourage bacteria growth (they get smelly).
    I think its the other way around. Synthetics usually have some sort of antibacterial treatment.

  18. #18
    Do It Yourself
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    Go to Old Navy. They have polyester T-shirts that dry as well if not better than my Coolmax jerseys for $10 or less depending on the sales.
    Long Live Long Rides

  19. #19
    Do It Yourself
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wobbegong
    How true. Anyone know a way to keep this in check?

    Tide with Bleach, OxyClean, or simillar to kill the germs.
    Long Live Long Rides

  20. #20
    UpHiller
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wobbegong
    How true. Anyone know a way to keep this in check?
    You can buy synthetic clothing with silver woven into it to help keep growth in check. I have a couple EMS shirts with Visaendurance and it does work. Plus the silver doesn’t wash out.

    http://www.milliken2.com/visa/visaht...age/index.html

    http://www.campmor.com/html/visa_endurance.shtml

    http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_d...=1150399199319

    http://www.mountainhardwear.com/Prod...&viewAll=False

    There is also another mill that makes the same thing as the Visaendurance, but the name escapes me at this moment.

    -Turd

    edit: I just clicked on my links and they don't work. Don't know why, but if you search for Visaendurance you'll find it.
    Last edited by TurdSandwich; 06-15-2006 at 12:32 PM.

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