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  1. #1
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    Ideas for winter Gloves...

    Just as it says, I ride all year round in Ontario Canada, -20C (for you Americans its -4F or if you are in the south its really freaking cold) a few times last year. Need an idea for good gloves. I have tried about a basket worth if different ones in the past few years and always cold hands and the rest of me is fine. Price is a consideration but a perfect glove is worth a bit.

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    KIN
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  2. #2
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    mec

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    Actually I found a great option is motorcycle winter gloves.
    They're almost as agile (bit bulkier but not TOO bad), I'm assuming you'll be shifting considerably less so the shift finger movement become less relevant. (IMO; I rarely shift at all in winter, if my derailleur's even moving it's a miracle)
    They're designed for winter use above 100mph so they're always warm.
    I find snowmobile gloves don't work, TOO bulky and the wrist postion seems different.

    In terms of proper "bicycle" gloves, I run Lake shells over fleece gloves on REALLY bad days, and MEC windproof shells over my regular cycling gloves on "mild days" (read: closer to -5 cel.)
    My commutes are short though, less than an hour usually.

    (for non-canucks, MEC is short for Mountain Equipment Co-op, best resource for outdoors gear I've ever found)

    TO rider here... what tires are you thinking of running?!
    I'm waffling this year, been hearing that it'll be a dry winter but cold so semi slicks and bulky coats seem in order....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts

    TO rider here... what tires are you thinking of running?!
    I'm waffling this year, been hearing that it'll be a dry winter but cold so semi slicks and bulky coats seem in order....

    I have heard of MEC and know a few people that have stuff from there, I will have to look. I have motorcycle gloves around but they are spring, might have to grab some winter ones.

    Shifting, minimal, just finishing my SS dry beast (ie roads are clear and little to no snow) and running regular road tires.
    In snow I have been using WTB Velociraptors F/R for years but they might be near the end of the life. I have used home made studded tires in the past with success for really snowy days but regular work about the same its the icy days that they shine.

    Keep em coming for ideas...
    KIN
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    8 Speed is great and V-Brakes rock!

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  4. #4

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    I brought up the homemade winter studded tires to a friend of mine and he pointed out that if you're running studs and you get off the snow and back onto pavement, your chances of biting it are very high. He mentioned that simple polyurethane rope wrapped around the wheel/tire between the spokes works really well due to its elasticity for its grip on the snow. Then when you hit pavement, it's soft again. I will have to try it out for myself, but it's a suggestion.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KINBOY
    I have heard of MEC and know a few people that have stuff from there, I will have to look. I have motorcycle gloves around but they are spring, might have to grab some winter ones.

    KIN

    If they're leather, poorly ventilated, and well-padded you might be ok!
    The padding makes for great insulation.

  6. #6
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    I find that lobster mitts work quite well for Calgary winters. I'm pretty sure that MEC sells a store branded set of 'em as well.

  7. #7
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    Moose Mitts

  8. #8
    More than a little slow
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    I've been wanting to try Moose Mitts for a long time.
    I'm in Toronto as well.
    My personal opinion is that you are going to get cold hands with any glove. You get out in the cold and your body is going to shut down circulation in your hands until your body is producing enough heat to keep your core warm. Then your circulation returns to your hands, but by this point they are cold (frozen). Sometimes they warm up again, sometimes they don't.
    I think that what we really need is lightish gloves with a heat source that will crank out heat for the first 10 to 15 minutes of a commute, then shut off. The same idea would work for feet.
    Cheers, Dave

  9. #9
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    I was gonna say hippo hands but I googled moose mitts and they are basically the same thing.

  10. #10
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    I just use Thinsulate lined leather work gloves from the harware store and they keep me pretty cozy on all of my rides down to about 5F. Below that I wear PI Lobster mitts or (even better if you don't mind the loss of dexterity) Black Diamond Mercury mitts.

    To the other poster aout studded tires. I ride a mix of pavement / ice in the winter and never had troubles with traction on the pavement with home-made or commercial studs. You're friend may be running too high of an air pressure or maybe his home-made studs are too long?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KINBOY
    Just as it says, I ride all year round in Ontario Canada, -20C (for you Americans its -4F or if you are in the south its really freaking cold) a few times last year. Need an idea for good gloves. I have tried about a basket worth if different ones in the past few years and always cold hands and the rest of me is fine. Price is a consideration but a perfect glove is worth a bit.

    Chime in
    KIN
    Last year I bought some cheap Gortex gloves with leather palm areas from Cablelas. They were very warm even riding in temps around 0F-10F with a head wind. I think Cabelas sells multiple versions of the gloves I got. I bought the cheapest ones at like 25.00 U.S. dollars. One of the glove seams has started to separate, but the gloves still worked fine last winter. These are proper winter gloves, not cycling gloves. Ofcourse they also cost about 1/3-1/2 of what expensive winter gloves cost.

    I hope that helps.

    BTW, I have no affiliation with Cabelas....well, except that I live in Nebraska and that is the state that Cabelas started.

  12. #12
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    I live in Ontario and commute all year round. I've tried all kinds of expensive cycling gloves but the best ones I've found were junk ones I bought at Walmart. The best cold weather jersey I've found is made by Under Armour. It blows away any of the normal cycling brands. You might want to think outside the box.

  13. #13
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    Neoprene Paddling Gloves.

    Not too thick, windproof, warm, curved to fit a paddle but works great for handlebars, long cuffs w/ velcro closure, inexpensive ~$20 USD



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  14. #14
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    ^^ That's a good idea.

    I use Manzella softshell gloves with Gore Windstopper in them down to about 15 degrees F, then below that I layer them under a pair of Pearl Izumi "winter" gloves that also do thier best to stop the wind. Using them layered like that I stay warm down to...as cold as I've ridden in (I think low single digits or maybe 1 or 2 below zero F). Windstopper is amazing stuff, and the softshell fabric is great in terms of being weatherproof. I think the windstopper softshell gloves under those pearl izumi lobster mitts would be the ticket...I've never used the lobsters though.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  15. #15
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    My fingers got real cold this morning...it was only 38F and some fog but it was cold on my bare fingers and thumbs.

    Tomorrow, I'm going to wear my Marsee motorcycle gloves. They are gore/leather/textile with crash padding. Overkill for bicycle commuting but I know they do not leak and they should work pretty well for bicycling.

    I don't know that I'd recommend them because they are damned expensive. After all, you are paying for high speed crash protection that you won't use on a bicycle.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for all the input. I do think outside the box, my thin and med tights are from walmart, cheap and work, the thick ones I use are good cycling ones but only need them seldom.

    Thanks again and I will follow up!
    KIN
    Yes its retro but IT WORKS!

    8 Speed is great and V-Brakes rock!

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  17. #17
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    During trail rides, my hands get hot too. A pair of XC skiing gloves will handle pretty cold weather there. In commuting (higher speed, no upper body gymnastics) I need more: this winter I'll see how cold I can handle with the pair of alpine skiing gloves I got at a clearout sale.

  18. #18
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    coldhands

    i just bought some pearl/izume lobster claws... very warm... in fact... too warm for anything over 40.... but once it gets into the 30s and wet... they rule.

  19. #19
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    My favorites are ice climbing gloves, specifically Arcteryx. I'm using the Gamma SV now. They're plenty warm enough, water proof, but I can still reach into my pockets grab the key for my bike lock and lock it up without having to take them off, I can even text on my cell phone with them on.

  20. #20
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    I'm noticing a lot of different opinions as to what winter and cold are. Everyone has a different climate that they are used to. I have no problem keeping warm down to 0F. When it starts getting below that my hands and feet start to get colder. -30F with windchill on top of that and it gets bad. Some of the best rides of my life have been when when it's too cold or too snowy for any rational person to be on a bicycle.

  21. #21
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    Jeez, I get the looks of "what are you doing on a bike?" by supposedly rational people when it RAINS, much less snowy and/or cold! But I ride anyway; it's what I do.

    -5F last year was the coldest I had to deal with; layering, winter gloves (new ones this year, Thinsulate-equipped) works for me. Used to have a set of insulated coveralls, but every time I go to replace them, my size is sold out!

    Next on the list is water/windproof shoe covers.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  22. #22
    nnn
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    Diving/Surfing neoprene gloves one size bigger with something breatheable and very thin underneath to stop sweating.
    "Life begins at 140" Richard Burns
    http://www.nikolay-k.com

  23. #23
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    I just found a deal on the motorcycle gloves I was mentioning. This is about half price from what I paid a couple of years ago.

    These are warm and waterproof and will also survive crashes. The interior is a cozy fleece-like material. The gauntlet is long so your coat will extend over it. The only down side is that they have quite a bit of leather on them. When they get really wet (the gore tex barrier keeps your hands dry, btw) they take some time for the exterior to dry out. It doesn't really matter though because the inside is always dry. They also have an extra inner liner that I don't use.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Rev...and-Women.html

  24. #24
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    I've got a set of Gore wind/waterproof gloves and for warmth I wear a thin insulator glove under those. My hands and fingers stay toasty.
    "Don't neever gave up..."

  25. #25
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    2nd the Moose Mitts or any other poagies. Once you try them you will never go back. Too warm for over 40F however, that's the main drawback... I guess.
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  26. #26
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    Anyone have any suggestions for getting a set of pogies that will fit an On One Midge bar?

  27. #27
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    Sounds like you have had some great suggestions for gloves. If the rest of you is warm while your hands are cold you probably have some issues with hand circulation.
    (Been there had that.) Here are a couple of things that can help. Keep your forearms well insulated you will find that improves warm blood flow to hands. Get a box of handwarmers pretty cheap at a chain store such as wallmart or target to drop in the palms (if you have those where-ever you are.) Get x-large size gloves with fingers that do not compress on your digits. (that severly limits circulation.) If you have large hands this is a major issue with most tight fitting gloves.
    I prefer a neoprene loose fitting glove and drop in a hand warmer. Also, I do booties with the hand warmers and my appendages stay toastie in most siduations.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Anyone have any suggestions for getting a set of pogies that will fit an On One Midge bar?
    AMF Threadworks is supposed to be coming out with Moose Mitts for drop bars soon... of course, they've been saying that for a year now.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    AMF Threadworks is supposed to be coming out with Moose Mitts for drop bars soon... of course, they've been saying that for a year now.
    The drop bar version is designed for the primary position to be on the hoods. Midges are designed for the primary position to be in the drops.

  31. #31
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    If you're going to recommend a glove could you please tell us what temperature it works at. Some people consider +10oC cold. I consider -10oC cold. We get reports of -30oC windchill up here.

  32. #32
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    descente wombat is where its at

  33. #33
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    Buy the most expensive cold weather riding-specific glove you can find. After your first cold-weather ride, send them back and demand a refund. Take the refund and buy a cheap pair of ski gloves, a cheap pair of winter paddling gloves, and a cheap pair of snowmobiling gloves. Keep only the pair that works well. On really cold days, I usually just use old ski gloves that are already falling apart.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    Buy the most expensive cold weather riding-specific glove you can find. After your first cold-weather ride, send them back and demand a refund. Take the refund and buy a cheap pair of ski gloves, a cheap pair of winter paddling gloves, and a cheap pair of snowmobiling gloves. Keep only the pair that works well. On really cold days, I usually just use old ski gloves that are already falling apart.
    this is so true; riding specific gloves blow huge - i've tried a few and have given up. cycling pogies do sound interesting though...

    big ass cheap kombi ski mitts for me - they are more than warm and you can shift and brake fine mtb or road (if anybody is thinking that might be an issue)
    Last edited by xcolin; 10-26-2008 at 08:03 AM.

  35. #35
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    These might work for you.

    http://epicdesigns-ak.blogspot.com/2...n-poggies.html[ATTACH]
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts
    If they're leather, poorly ventilated, and well-padded you might be ok!
    The padding makes for great insulation.
    Last year in the Chicagland area we had some cold weather some days it was a hi of 10F.

    I found a very old pair of Mittens in the closet.
    They are RealCowhide (Leather). They are windproof. With a liner they kept my hands toastie warm.

    Are they breathable? At 4-6degree mornings I Dont Care.

    I comute on a Fixxed singlespeed so I don't need toweara Fingered Glove

  37. #37
    viva la v-brakes!
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    NORM! How's it going man? I hope you have at least one brake on that fixies because I can tell you from experience those Paltine drivers are stupid. You know that too of course

    Back on the subject, being a vegetarian I cannot condone such things but I have also found that leather work gloves are very effective at blocking the wind and being comfy in the winter if you have a liner glove underneath them for insulation.

    Also, in regards to those cheap skiing gloves people are recommending, you really need to find something that is breathable. The really cheap ski gloves have plastic liners to make them "waterproof". As a result, they don't breath and your sweat builds up and then you hands get cold and clammy and fingers start falling off.
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