How to dress for cold weather closer to freezing point- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    62

    How to dress for cold weather closer to freezing point

    Went out today riding early in the morning, went to and setup the rack mounted the bike, it was like 2C outside, I had my leg warmer, padded shorts, cotton undershirt, another shirt, arm warmer and Gore Alp-X jacket.

    I'm fairly new to riding and clothing in layering concept is all new to me, also I had my doubt on the Gore jacket but it worked well today. With my other jacket, I would sweat like crazy and my undershirts would be all wet!

    During the ride, I actually got warmer, I had to pull the arm warmer and unzip a bit of the jacket, then it was okay rest of the ride. The jacket was getting slightly moist, but after I unzipped it was okay. I'm very impressed with its performance, also with the close to freezing temperature, I felt okay.

    I have summer jerseys, I wonder if I should have worn jersey instead of cotton undershirt? I was thinking a winter long sleeve jersey, but not sure if it would be too hot if I wear the jacket on top. I didn't pick the jersey as I thought it would make me feel cold as undershirt. I have never tried jersey's in the summer, I just bought some online and they arrived when the temperature is cold But I guess this is the time to get off season clothing for good price!

    Any suggestions would be great?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,501
    cotton kills, get wool (or sythentics).
    warm sweater/jersey and a heavy windproof vest should get you through sub-zero days. if not switch to full jacket.
    it makes a big difference, and you can actually make do with a lighter weight sweater if you're running full sleeves, but it's easier to overheat that way.
    it's a learning process.

    commuter guys have a "long cold winter support" thread, the suggestions for gear etc are universal. too many MTB types wuss out when the snow's axle-deep so...
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    19
    summer jersey or polyester shirt like nike legend t or G9 stuff at target. Maybe a thin long sleeve poly shirt with a regular shirt on top. Top it off with a breathable (not PU coated) nylon windshell like the $35 canari. Gore probably doesn't breathe as well but since you've got it already... Check out eVent next time you're looking for stuff with a membrane. Wear a thin beanie under the helmet, then when you start getting hot take off the hat and unzip or remove the windshirt. Should be good to 0C if you're working hard.

    The hands and feet are the tough part on a road bike IMO. Membrane softshell type gloves and neoprene booties are the ticket.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    66
    I definitely ride in that transition temperature range on both the road and mtb, and I will say that wind and sweat protection is the key. What I have found that works really well around freezing, starting from the bottom up. Booties over my shoes, or dedicated winter shoes, but ful coverage booties are cheap, and warm wool socks, run your shoes as loose as possible. For my legs, a really light pair of tights on top of summer riding shorts, then a single layer of nylon pants over the tights. For my torso, a summer jersey, possibly arm warmers, and at least start with a thin single layer nylon shell, then wear some good gloves, and a thin wool hat.

    I actually really like wool for both my socks and hat, or a wool/syn blend. Also, a tight under layer with a thin weather layer is key. With the legs for example, the tights will keep the cold nylon pants off my legs and will keep me plenty warm riding through the wet mud around freezing. If your bottom layer is loose, it will intermittently contact your skin and will cool down when not touching and then feel cold. I also hate thick layers since they are uncontrollable. With pants or jackets that are all in one, the inner liner just gets wet and cold as it flops around, or it is so tight that the outer layer restricts you.

    It can be a blast riding in cold weather and it is awesome around 15-25F. The last piece of the puzzle are some studded tires if you ride in the ice like I do.

    Good luck and have fun!

  5. #5
    A bike brought me here!
    Reputation: Poikaa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    326

    ... and if we just ... Winter riding in Sweden

    This Swede is sure bold riding in these temps!

    Stay Warm When Winter Cycling - YouTube

    poikaa
    "I don't ride a bike, I'm the pilot!"

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    289
    Layers... Compression shorts/pants as well as a compression shirt/long shirt... Windproof gortex is win:

    Mountain Hardwear | Men's Jackets, Mountaineering Coats & Ski Parkas

  7. #7
    Have a great ride!
    Reputation: Lowkey1505's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    126
    Under ArmourŽ USA | Men's ColdGearŽ Longsleeve Compression Mock | 1000512 | $49.99
    Under ArmourŽ USA | Men's UA EVO ColdGearŽ Compression Leggings | 1221714 | $49.99
    This is what I wear under my regular riding clothes when its cold. As long as your not just standing still for long periods of time it will keep you plenty warm. Oh and warm socks.
    Whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  8. #8
    That Unicycle Guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    354
    0˚ is a tough temperature to dress for since it isn't cold enough for winter cloths but you will get chilled if you stop moving. Ventilation is key as well as wearing good wicking fabrics to keep your body dry.

    I would wear a thin wool base layer, a breathable insulating layer on your torso and a thin shell. Once you warm up you should open up the shell and/or remove the insulating layer to avoid overheating.


    Get rid of the cotton. As soon as you sweat in it it will conduct heat away from your body.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    343
    I have a pair of North Face cross country ski pants with Windstopper fabric, and they are great for right around freezing. The windstopper fabric is only on the front, so they are still breathable, and although they are not waterproof, they work well in light rain or snow. I used them for the first time this June (it was a long winter) for a ride where it was about 40 degrees with a mix of light rain and snow flurries. I was perfectly comfortable the whole time, whether I was moving or stopped.
    Matt

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swingset's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    348
    If you want some very good base layers, Go Athletic makes absolutely THE finest base layers, bar none. Super comfortable, very warm and very breathable. They're made 100% in America, and here's the real kicker - they're half the price of Under Armor, North Face, etc. Vietnamese and Chinese stuff. Nice folks too...pleasure to talk to.

    Go Athletic Apparel Next Generation Sportswear
    "Wait, this thing doesn't have a motor?" - Socrates

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DECIM8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    195
    I have always found cotton to be the bane of any activity in cold weather, especially if it is loose fitting. Its not the best quality but I picked up marino wool tights and long sleeved base layer from Costco the other day for $25 each. With their return policy you can't go wrong in trying them. Probably doesn't help if you aren't in the states though. I wore those, Fox Ranger shorts (with liner), a jersey, fleece jacket (loose fitting), my hiking shoes (yay platforms), work gloves and a thin wool beanie under my helmet on my ride yesterday. I was comfortable at 35°f, wasn't real wet from sweat and never had to strip a layer. The fleece breaths just enough at this temperature and doesn't hold moisture. A note on the gloves, they are leather carpenters gloves with rubber protection on the top of the fingers and grip on the palms/fingers. I got them from Lowe's or Home Depot for ~$15 and they have been great for everything but hot summer days. Actually work better than I thought for cold weather and one of my better investments.

  12. #12
    Propedal Off
    Reputation: Sin Wagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    14
    Merino wool is the ultimate base layer material for almost any outdoor activity. It is extremely warm for its weight and wicks moisture like no other. Bonus is that you can wear it more than a couple times and resists odor. Downside is it is expensive and can easily be destroyed it in the dryer. Im amazed when i pull merino out of the washing machine how it feels almost dry just from the spin cycle. Search around for good deals on google

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bloodyknee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,067
    +1 for wool. The wicking materials for me just don't keep me warm when it gets below freezing, but some wool, even if a thin layer helps me stay warm without overheating. I love wool socks in the winter and some sort of liner in my helmet. Also, check out a buff or a neck gator....Turtle Fur MFS Neck Gaiter at REI.com .. they are really nice and you can cover your face up when it gets cold.

    A vest that is windproof in the front and mesh in the back blocks the wind but lets you breathe so you don't sweat too much .

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    39
    A good pair of winter cycling boots helps too. I got a pair of Northwave Artic GTX boots and my feet have been pretty toasty

  15. #15
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,101
    The legs and body are easy. A good wicking baselayer is all ya need really, combined with some wind breaking fabric to go over it. Once you get warmed up, these parts stay warm. Get a light shell jacket that you can easily just stuff somewhere to keep you warm until you fully warm up.

    Hands and feet are the critical points. If those are too cold or overheated/stuffy, rides aren't as enjoyable. *GOOD socks*, and good overboots make a huge difference. Gloves, just pick. Some people like wearing standard gloves and using big mittens that install over their bars, so they can still have the dexterity to use their controls on the bike.

    Personally, I use the cold weather as another reason to wear protective gear.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    633
    1) Three types of layers - wicking (base), insulating and barrier.

    Base layers job is to pull the moisture away from your skin. Cotton kills as a base since it keeps the moisture next to your skin. I love some of the better synthetic base layers (Patagonia, Arcteryx, Craft) because they pull so much moisture away from you. Merino (Icebreaker, Ibex, I/O Bio) is good because it keeps its thermal properties even when wet and does not stink. Personally think the top synthetics pull more moisture than Merino but either is great. No cotton

    Vary your insulating layer to create a warm enough air gap. This air gap is what keeps you warm. Thermal fabrics, Merino wools ... etc are all insulators. Use SS Jerseys, LS Jerseys .., etc as needed. Again no cotton

    The Barrier layer needs to keep the weather out (wind, rain, snow) but be breathable enough via membrane / vents / zippers that you don't overheat. Your Goretex jacket is great for keeping rain out but may have trouble with all the heat you generate cycling. Like eVent (Showers Pass) if it is wet out or Windstopper (Gore) if its just cold/windy.

    2) Make sure your head, hands and feet are warm as it gets colder. You generate alot of heat riding so as long as you are moving and have a good base to wick and a barrier to keep out the weather you will be warm (probably too warm in fact). You lose a lot of heat through your head. Keep it covered if you want to stay warm and protect those hands and feet. Nothing sucks more than cold/wet feet on a long ride

    -Shane
    Last edited by Shane_CA; 11-26-2011 at 11:26 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Frozen Fork in Freezing Weather
    By R88 in forum Specialized
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-06-2010, 03:35 PM
  2. Freezing cold= great riding
    By Mike Brown in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 01-18-2010, 08:33 AM
  3. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-26-2009, 11:43 PM
  4. Replies: 39
    Last Post: 11-24-2008, 10:57 AM
  5. First ride in the freezing cold/mud of Scotland
    By mezzanine in forum Intense
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-04-2004, 06:33 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.