Helmet Cam Video Smoothing.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
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    Helmet Cam Video Smoothing.

    I have seen alot of top quality helmet camera videos on this and other mtb sites and the big question is: How do they get the video to roll so smoothly with not even hardly the slightest of bumpiness?

    Is it a camera setting I am missing, or maybe certain cameras do better at stabilization than others? I would like to improve video quality on my camera (Sony Cybershot DSC-W290).

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Better cameras with better image stabilization. You can also run it through deshaker.
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  3. #3
    Tool
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    I'm not aware of any consumer-grade helmet cam that has on-board IS. The best IS is mechanical, and it's tough to put in a small package and sell cheaply.

    The GoPros and VholdRs definitely have none. A fair portion of the vids posted here are shot on one of those two brands.

    Without IS, it's all about mounting. Understanding vibration, resonance, materials, and mechanics helps take some of the guesswork out.

    Handlebars are one of the worst places to mount a camera if you want steady video. Your handlebars are designed to be comfortable in your hands while giving you control - this means that there is some flex built in, and this will lead to shake.

    I've had the best luck with either frame or fork mounting. On the frame, I've been mounting the camera facing rearward on the seat tube where it meets the top tube. This has worked very well on several different frames. For the fork mount, I haven't mounted my camera on a traditional fork yet; only on the side of my Lefty facing forward, but this is my favorite mount location: very steady, and I love the angle. On a traditional fork, you can probably mount atop the crown or perhaps on the side. Hopefully everyone is keen to the dangers of something getting in their front spokes and will proceed with the appropriate care and caution when fork-mounting a camera.

    My frame mounts have proven to be much steadier than my helmet mount. My helmet mount is very secure and does not shake at all relative to the helmet, but no matter how tightly I cinch down the helmet, and even with a counter weight attached, I cannot get helmet footage as smooth as frame mounted. The smoothest helmet-mounted vids I’ve seen were all using full-face helmets. These seem to move around on your head much less than lightweight vented helmets.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  4. #4
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
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    Great information. The helmet cams are rough because you almost have to choke yourself with the chin strap to keep the helmet from flopping around with the weight of the camera on it.

    I built a cheap 3 dollar chest mount but they tend to point too far down and you can't see much ahead of the bike...Of course, the mount is a cheap plastic ziploc bowl from walmart that I ran straps through and mounted the camera inside.. Just have to build one that compensates for the downward angle of the chest whilst riding.

    I was thinking maybe a clamp mount project - something like a strong clamp that opens and grabs on various places to offer some versatility in mounting on the bike. Have to check the feasibility of it though - still in the infancy stage.

  5. #5
    Tool
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    Velcro is your friend.

    You could cradle your camera in velcro straps, then use velcro to attach it to whatever.

    Your camera is shaped like the GoPro, which lends itself to mounting in front of things (vs. the VholdR which is better for mounting on the sides of things). You might be able to rig something up on the front of your headset.

    You can make your own custom velcro straps by sticking the loop and hook pieces back to back.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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