helmet cam recommendations- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    helmet cam recommendations

    Im lookin to buy a helmet cam, but i have no idea which 1. What would you guys recommend? take the price issue away for the moment. and also, how do u know if your camera has the analog input thing that it hooks up into? thanks guys
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  2. #2
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    i'd get a viosport3...
    i think they have diff. connectors for diff cameras...

  3. #3
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    viosport

    I would go to Viosport.com first and look your camera up on their compatability chart. If your cam cannot take one, your search is over. Some camcorders can take the cam but not the lanc remote. If you dont have the LANC you have to run the helmet cam live the whole time and manually turn on and off your camera before and after your ride/run.

    Most helmet cams connect in a similar fashion, you need an av in. Usually that is yellow ringed headphonejack looking port. The LANC port looks the same but has a blue ring around it.

    You also need to know how many tv lines your camera records at. If you look at the helmet cams you will see that some cams record at 380 lines, some at 480 lines and some higher. You are limited usually be the recording capability of your camcorder. So if your recorder records at 400 lines and you buy a helmet cam that has 480 line capability, you get the lower of the two. There is usually a 100 dollar difference between the two setups.

    Viosport is good,
    Bulletcam is good
    HelmetCam is good
    they all have websites to check out.

    www.westsidefreeride.com

  4. #4
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    miniDV is supposed to be @ 500 lines of res,
    but where the vio3 claims 520 lines, the pic is still
    worse than from a basic low-end miniDV camcorder....
    i'd get the highest res helmetcam available,
    which (short of a super expensive 3chip one)
    is basically any one with the sony ex-view HAD chip (like the vio3).

  5. #5
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    I ahve the one from www.helmetcamera.com and it works great. I highly reccomend it! I say buy one!


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  6. #6
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    i might look into the viosport 3, but im just curious how can you tell if ur DV cam can take it? mine has an A/V output, but i have no idea if it has an input. anyone know how u can tell? yes i know
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  7. #7
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  8. #8
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    well, yea my camera doesnt work with it. I want a new camera anyways, so i need some recommendations. hopefully not more than 500 bux, but i do have a decent budget. Any recommendations on a sick but well priced video camera?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by acdcfan1283
    well, yea my camera doesnt work with it. I want a new camera anyways, so i need some recommendations. hopefully not more than 500 bux, but i do have a decent budget. Any recommendations on a sick but well priced video camera?
    Sony HC42 works with LANC. I think it has 540lines and you can get your hands on one for under $400. I get nice quality with my helmetcamera.com cam

  10. #10

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    Smile Helmet Camera - to know

    Picking the right helmet camear all depends on what type of filming you wan to do. This may sound old, but it's the most important starting point. If you're making a DVD you're in a different group than just going out and filming your rides for fun/personal interest.

    These are the things you shoul look at.

    1. Camera Chip Used
    There are two types of camera chips on the market you will generally find. The first is a CCD chip, which is what all the helmet cameras you will find on line are using. CCD provides a whiter light and the maximum resolution availalbe in a consumer level camera. 520 scan lines (which people wrote above) is just a 480 resolution camera maginfied. The drawbacks to the CCD chip is the power consumption. It requires you to use 8 AA batteries, which generally last around 4 hours. While this may not seem important when you're riding a lot the additional weight and the hassle of buying new batteries every ride can add up. Sources for these are all listed in the threads above.

    The newest chip you are now seeing in a lot of camcorders, digital cameras, and production cameras are CMOS chips. CMOS chips generally run around 400 scan lines and are a bit more color sensitive. For actionsports though they provide two very important benefits. The first is power consumption, 9 volts. Therefore your helmet camera can run off a single 9-volt battery, instead of 8 AAs, and can last for around 16-20 hours. The second plus is the way the chip is manufactured, which makes the chip much more compact and durable, especially for action sports usage. The only company I've found using the CMOS chip is Twenty20 Helmet Camera (Twenty20Camera.com).

    2. Connectors

    While connectors aren't advertised on the packaging and seldom mentioned they are usually the first failure point with any camera products outdoors. If you're looking at a helmet camera with RCA plugs, good luck. Theose are indoor rated connectors that don't lock in and will take the ware and tear of the weather conditions. I'm sure there are a lot of RCA connector using helmet cameras that have been tapped together with electrical tape to make sure you don't lose signal. Make sure what you use has waterproof connectors that snap together so your video doesn't stop working part way through, which has happened to me more times than I can count.

    3. Mount
    Check out the helmet mount provided with the camera. I found a lot of pictures of helmet cameras on the internet are taken without the mount because either the mount they include sucks, or they don't provide one at all. The non waterproof velcro doesn't hold anything and I'm not a fan of a strap around my head to hold the camera.

    4. Weight
    Weight is a factor for some guys but not others. The weigth has to do with that batter issue I mentioned, the number of connectors, or the wires used. It's just somthing to look at.

    5. Warranty
    Make sure the company provides at least a one year warranty on the product, not just a product on the mount or some part of it.

    6. Recording Device
    This is an area where the digital world is changing what you use. If you want to record the highest quality footage any camcorder (needs an A/V input) than go with a mini-DV camcorder. The DVD camcorders are un-proven with vibration, especailly mountain biking.

    The digital options availalbe are digital camcorders or a personal media player. Regardless of what you choose you should look at the resolution of the recorder (320x240 = web quality, 640x480 = tv quality, 720x480 = dvd quality). The next factor is frames per second, which you want to be around 30, otherwise high speed video looks choppy. The last option is price. You can find SD flash card based personal media players (Mustek PVR-A1) is about $125 and records an hour at web quality. Hard drive based recorders (RCA Lyra RD2780) is about $200 on ebay and records 20 hours of video.


    I've spent a lot of time filming with POV so I hope that helps. It's a bit overboard, but there are truly a lot of myths about helmet cameras and what's available. I'd avoid buy the cheap crap on Ebay and ask your local shop what they'd recommend because sometimes they have good ideas or product they sell.

    Have Fun.

  11. #11
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    man, i just tried a twenty20 with a CMOS sensor
    & it was amazing how long that little 9volt lasted!
    the drawback was that it couldnt adjust quickly enough to changing lighting conditions
    to be good for filming most riding. it took @ 4-5x as long as a vio3 to
    adjust its exposure....

  12. #12
    ride hard take risks
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    A friend was looking for one awhile back & some of the best video i have seen herre is from raptordude, he recomended this one as best bang for the buck.

    http://www.hoyttech.com/default.cfm

  13. #13

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    Cmos Sensor Reply

    yeah, the CMOS sensor is a bit more sensitive, which is a trade-off. It's a touch slower in transition than a CCD, but the speed traveling on a bicycle should work well, it's just a CCD while provide a "whiter" light. In general trail videos and over cast video days are some of the best video conditions because you can reduce direct light glare from the sun.

    I think Twenty20 hase trail video samples on their website.

  14. #14
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    it was actually more like 4-5 seconds for the CMOS to fully adjust its exposure when
    shifting from a well lit to a shadowed subject....pretty slowwwww.....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by seattle99
    . I'd avoid buy the cheap crap on Ebay and ask your local shop what they'd recommend because sometimes they have good ideas or product they sell.
    I had purchased one from ebay 520 line'ed one and it works really really good. I don't have any complaints at all, and the picture quality is really nice. Also for me most of my rides wether its shuttling or trail riding I don't usually end up riding past 4 hours so the AA's is sufficiant for me. I also noticed if I am not doing a continous recording the batteries lasts longer.

    I guess it all depends on who from ebay your buying the helmet camera from, but I have nothing but really good experaince from my ebay purchase.

  16. #16
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    I'll post a complete guide complete with photos proabobly this weekend (A lot of people have questions about helmet camera's...and I am the master.)
    Northstar 2008 Riding Crew

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptordude
    I'll post a complete guide complete with photos proabobly this weekend (A lot of people have questions about helmet camera's...and I am the master.)
    sounds good
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  18. #18
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    He cant route his cables for beans but his video is very sharp, clean & xtreamly well done. Kids got talent!!!good talent.

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