Having difficulty with eggbeater / shoes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Having difficulty with eggbeater / shoes

    Since it is the off season for me I want to sort something out.

    I seem to have much difficulty with clipping in with the egg beater pedals I purchased last spring. I wear a pair of inexpensive Specialized shoes. I have to feel around way to much sometimes I get in right away other times I don't. It is distracting when riding challenging trails. I look too much like the noob I am.

    Orginally I was using (used.. from a friend) spds and had no problem. since the pedals were getting beatup and old I decided to switch to something different. never had a problem with the SPDs. And yes I changed the cleats to the ones I got with the new pedals.

    Are they usually this finicky or can you suggest something I am missing. I wonder if they these pedals work best with certain types of shoe geometery and patterns.

    BTW Unclipping is effortless.

    Best regards
    Blueliner
    (Go Leafs go)

  2. #2
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    How long have you been riding with the eggbeaters?

    I find that any change in pedals requires a bit of a learning curve to have clipping in become second nature.

  3. #3
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    Make sure the cleats of your shoe are not getting in the way. If they are, use the included shim on the eggbeater cleat or sand down the shoe cleats a bit.

    Personally, I learned on the eggbeaters and I have never had any problems trying out new clipless systems SPD, time, etc

  4. #4
    Chubby Chaser
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    For the first ride I couldn't get clipped in if my life depended on it. I literally looked like a moron in the parking lot looking down for a good 10 mins trying to get one foot clipped in.

    Later I realized the trick is to just start pedaling unclipped, and as I'm pedaling I would just move my foot around and eventually it would get clipped in.

    After a couple of rides getting clipped in was a lot quicker but it's still not exactly "easy". Just keep at it.

  5. #5
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    Rode SPD for a few years, then decided to try Crank Bros. I gave them a two months. Went back to SPD.

    SPD is much easier to clip into. The whole system is designed so it guides the cleat into the position, you can slam your foot basically at a random position on the pedal, and the SPD will guide you in.

    It does not help that the Crank Bros pedals are asymmetrical by design. There are two cages on each pedal, one smaller and one bigger (as the small one is "hugged" by the big one). This means that you have a 50/50 chances that you will be trying to clip into the big one, or the small one. If the small one is rotated in front, well, god help you if you REALLY need to clip in fast in some tricky situation.

    But, you know, whatever works. SPD works for me.
    Daemon
    "Worship the Machines."
    www.nivas.hr | www.worship.hr

  6. #6
    Subject to Whimsy
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    Some shoes work better than others with regard to clipping in with Eggbeaters.
    Definitely try out the shims that should have come with your pedals. Using them gives a bit more clearance and can help with clipping in.
    Other than that, it's all practice makes perfect.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post

    It does not help that the Crank Bros pedals are asymmetrical by design. There are two cages on each pedal, one smaller and one bigger (as the small one is "hugged" by the big one). This means that you have a 50/50 chances that you will be trying to clip into the big one, or the small one. If the small one is rotated in front, well, god help you if you REALLY need to clip in fast in some tricky situation.
    Say what? I've been riding egg beaters for years and have never seen "one side bigger then the other" thing you speak of.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by a1m80t View Post
    Make sure the cleats of your shoe are not getting in the way. If they are, use the included shim on the eggbeater cleat or sand down the shoe cleats a bit.

    Personally, I learned on the eggbeaters and I have never had any problems trying out new clipless systems SPD, time, etc
    +1 on ^ this.

    My Specialized shoes with Eggbeaters needed the shims badly. First few rides were beyond the normal stupid clipless falls.
    Clipping in was tough, but far worse - I couldn't get out!

    Oh and yeah, the springs are identical, CB cleats are asymetrical.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WindWithMe View Post
    Say what? I've been riding egg beaters for years and have never seen "one side bigger then the other" thing you speak of.
    You need to open your eyes a little bit then. There are two cages, bigger and smaller. Bigger one hugs the smaller one, and there is no doubt that the surface area which can accept the cleat is bigger on the big one.

    This is one of the reasons why on Crank Bros site all the Egg Beater pedals are photographed from one angle only - the one showing the bigger cage. Smaller cage is always neatly "tucked" away.

    Daemon
    "Worship the Machines."
    www.nivas.hr | www.worship.hr

  10. #10
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    True, but you can still get in on all 4 side of the pedal. Well, at least I have never had a problem on my Eggbeaters or my Mallets.

  11. #11
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    Yea, you can clip in from any side you want, I even experimented with backswipe clipping. It's all fun and games, but when you are on an upward tricky slope with roots and whatnots, you learn to appreciate the design of SPD which is much easier to clip in.

    Standing still on a cool mountain flat track with no pressure, I agree, Eggbeaters rock. You can clip in LIKE A BOSS.

    Being in a tricky situation, thanks, I'll skip. =)
    Daemon
    "Worship the Machines."
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Goes Boing View Post
    For the first ride I couldn't get clipped in if my life depended on it. I literally looked like a moron in the parking lot looking down for a good 10 mins trying to get one foot clipped in.

    Later I realized the trick is to just start pedaling unclipped, and as I'm pedaling I would just move my foot around and eventually it would get clipped in.

    After a couple of rides getting clipped in was a lot quicker but it's still not exactly "easy". Just keep at it.
    This right here. Just pedal and it'll pop in. You'll get to where it happens faster as you get accustomed to the shoe/pedal combo.
    "Wait, this thing doesn't have a motor?" - Socrates

  13. #13
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    I have recently bought a pair of CB Mallets paired with 5.10 Hellcats. My first ride was tough I couldn't clip in on the DH sections to save my life. I had to add a total of 3 shims to compensate for the deep pocket the cleat sits in on the 5.10s. I practiced in the street for a bit and was able to clip in/out pretty easily and quickly. On the trail is a different story. I don't know if it's fear of falling, slow climbing speed and no centrifical force to hold me up but clipping out can still be a PITA! I only have 3 rides under my belt with clipless pedals and I assume it's gonna be a little while before I am really comfortable and clipping in/out becomes second nature. But i feel your pain. Luckily the only times I have fallen are at slow speed while trying to clip out. I have this voice in my head on tech sections and DH sections that tells me to unclip at least one foot. I do not have the talent to unclip quickly if I needed too. Right now I am 50/50 with the pedals. I can't wait until clipping in/out becomes second nature. Growing pains I guess. If anyone has any advice, I am all ears!!!
    2018 Intense Sniper XC

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post
    It does not help that the Crank Bros pedals are asymmetrical by design. There are two cages on each pedal, one smaller and one bigger (as the small one is "hugged" by the big one). This means that you have a 50/50 chances that you will be trying to clip into the big one, or the small one. If the small one is rotated in front, well, god help you if you REALLY need to clip in fast in some tricky situation.
    not discounting your experience, but in no way is that right. for the first 2 or so rides it is a little harder but then it is old hat. if you think about it every opening is the same, just 2 are narrow in front and 2 are narrow in back.

    op, you just may need a few more rides. you do have to get used to where to place your foot to build up some muscle memory.

  15. #15
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    Think the ease of clipping-in is directly related to the pucker factor.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    not discounting your experience, but in no way is that right. for the first 2 or so rides it is a little harder but then it is old hat.
    I don't know, I gave them two months of basically every day riding (small XC runs on the week days, one big whole day AM run on the weekend). Two months. Still could not clip in.

    When I switched back to SPD I could instantly, in the same day, clip into them with no effort at all even in tricky situations (climbs, etc..).

    But, I will say it again, WHATEVER WORKS FOR YOU FOLKS.

    I reserve the possibility that if CrankBros was my first clipless pedal I would feel at home with them and not the other way around. We are really talking flavors of the icecream here, not should one eat icecream or not. I like vanilla, you like chocolate, let's all agree that clipless rocks and that icecream is awesome.

    =)
    Daemon
    "Worship the Machines."
    www.nivas.hr | www.worship.hr

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post

    I reserve the possibility that if CrankBros was my first clipless pedal I would feel at home with them and not the other way around. We are really talking flavors of the icecream here, not should one eat icecream or not. I like vanilla, you like chocolate, let's all agree that clipless rocks and that icecream is awesome.

    =)
    i agree 100%. ill admit getting into spd's is a little easier, maybe you had some out of spec cb's though because ive never heard anyone say that about them.

  18. #18
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    I rode SPD then tried Eggbeaters. Now I ride flats with some 5.10s. Sticky rubber plus metal pins equals as much pedal feel as clip-ins. Riding flats has improved my riding; specifically, climbing. Restarting on technical uphills is easier. Bailing on flats is easier as well.

    That said, I still use SPD on my commuter/path bike. Better system than eggbeater, in my experience.

  19. #19
    No longer a hardtailkid.
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    I just installed the shims that came with the pedals and the problem is gone. I had been dealing with it since I started running that pedal/shoe combo.
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  20. #20
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    I switched from SPD's to eggs some time ago. Much prefer the eggs - better mud clearance and easier to clip-out of, not to mention lighter.

    Keep the springs/cages clean and lubed w/ a few drops of dry teflon chain lube and getting in/out is like butter.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post
    There are two cages, bigger and smaller. Bigger one hugs the smaller one, and there is no doubt that the surface area which can accept the cleat is bigger on the big one.

    This is one of the reasons why on Crank Bros site all the Egg Beater pedals are photographed from one angle only - the one showing the bigger cage. Smaller cage is always neatly "tucked" away.

    You have grossly overstated the difference in engagement area between the inner and outer cages .
    There is only about a 1mm difference. This is nothing.



    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

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