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  1. #1

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    Got Ranayuds? What gloves?

    Three weekends of leaf blowing has left me with a case of Raynauds Syndrome in my right index finger. I guess I am lucky to have it limited to that, but it really will be a problem this winter, since it gets white/green and very cold even indoors now. I am searching for the best glove solution.

    Some NEMBA posts have helped point me to some solutions, but big battery packs connected to gloves seem too heavy and awkward. Chem packs seems like the way to go, under fleece gloves to let them get the oxygen they need to work well. Water will be a problem, probably.

    Anyone got a solution that works well? TIA for any ideas.

    Unsprung

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unsprung
    Three weekends of leaf blowing has left me with a case of Raynauds Syndrome in my right index finger. I guess I am lucky to have it limited to that, but it really will be a problem this winter, since it gets white/green and very cold even indoors now. I am searching for the best glove solution.

    Some NEMBA posts have helped point me to some solutions, but big battery packs connected to gloves seem too heavy and awkward. Chem packs seems like the way to go, under fleece gloves to let them get the oxygen they need to work well. Water will be a problem, probably.

    Anyone got a solution that works well? TIA for any ideas.

    Unsprung
    Pheripheral circulatory problem like your might be helped by stretching or even better position from seat to handlebars. It does not sound like Raynaud's (usually bilateral, multizone with onset attacks), get a second opinion and rule out other possible problems.
    old fart cyclist

  3. #3
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    IMHO your best bet would be to use a lobster style glove (the type that splits your fingers two and two). This way your index finger can keep warm next to the middle by keeping skin to skin. Nothing is better than body heat. Plus it will leave room for a hot pack.
    I have never used a hot pack so I dont know how hot they get. Becareful with them on the raynauds finger cause the reduction in blood flow will reduce the amount of heat that the finger can dissipate putting you at risk for thermal injury. Just my opinion, check with you dr.

    joe

  4. #4
    pewpewpew Moderator
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    I have raynauds as well. Depending on how cold it is I find that dual layering is pretty good. I have a pair of silk - like inner glove liners that are quite helpful.


    link:click here


    When combined with the wind proof performance gloves my hands do pretty well. I have ridden in temps as low with the 30's with this combo - not perfect, and if they get wet all bets are off - but not bad.

    I have thought about putting boot warming inserts (like the kind you get for skiing) on the backs of my hands as well - but then I moved to SoCal and I just haven't been riding in the cold like I used to.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unsprung
    Anyone got a solution that works well?

    Buy a rake.
    Your fear of looking stupid is holding you back.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Buy a rake.
    A little too late for that.

    Unfortunately, it gets way lower than 30 around here in CT. 5 above is the coldest I rode last year, but I think those days are gone. It was 24 today, and I wore three layers and a chemical warmer, and still had problems. I will try newer, better gloves next weekend, since the ones I wore today were pretty trashed, but the colder days are history for my rides.

    I am pretty sure it is Raynauds, but do plan to ask for another opinion if things don't get any better over time.

    Thanks for all the input.

    Slider

  7. #7
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    My wife has the same condition. She's found that by making sure you keep your core really warm, it helps with the fingers getting enough blood. Also since vibration can make it worse, maybe try some cushy grips.
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  8. #8
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Slider, I've been fighting Raynaud's for years now. You'd think I'd be ok living here in the hot desert, but the chill of getting out of my 90-degree pool on a windy 105-degree day can send my fingers into the white zone. I get white fingers in the summer, spring, fall, and winter and my attacks can happen anywhere - indoors or outdoors. As said before, the main defense against a Raynaud's attack is prevention - keep your core warm and your fingers tend to stay ok.

    As to your request for a glove recommendation, give any gloves with Gore Windstopper a try. This fall I am using new Specialized gloves with Windstopper for mtn biking, road biking, and motorcycling and have found them to be remarkably warm. I'll look up the name of the gloves when I get home tonight... The problem with Windstopper alone is that it is not waterproof. I have yet to find a glove that protects against both - wind and water. I am in search of the perfect glove for all my sports too!!

    I also recommend that you visit a rheumatologist. I have had good results lessening the Raynaud's attacks with the use of high blood pressure meds which serve to keep the blood flowing to my cold extremities (I get Raynaud's in all of my fingers and toes). You'll have to work with the doc to find a HBP med that doesn't drop your BP too low, but I believe that this is the best medication known at this time for treating Raynaud's.

    Good luck and stay warm!!
    Kathleen

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by DurtGurl
    Slider, I've been fighting Raynaud's for years now. You'd think I'd be ok living here in the hot desert, but the chill of getting out of my 90-degree pool on a windy 105-degree day can send my fingers into the white zone. I get white fingers in the summer, spring, fall, and winter and my attacks can happen anywhere - indoors or outdoors. As said before, the main defense against a Raynaud's attack is prevention - keep your core warm and your fingers tend to stay ok.
    Kathleen
    Now you really have me wondering if what I have is Raynauds, or something else. It happens only in my right index finger, and isn't bilateral. It is less of a sudden onset thing, and I can always tell my finger is less warm than the rest of my hand. I have a constant minor pain on the inside of the finger, and I am pretty sure that is an inflamed nerve. Overall, it is nothing like what you describe.

    From what I've read, you have to be concered about lots more seconday complications like scleroderma and lupus. Since my minor variation really annoys me, I empathize with you!

    I think there are lesser versions of Raynauds, and I might well have that. The problem is that the central nervous system is so complex, you just can't know who to trust, diagnosis-wise. I will not go to a chiropractor, for example, since I think they can do more damage than good. But is seems the central nervous system plays a key role, somehow.

    So I am left with keeping everything warm including the best glove option I can find. This forum has helped a lot, and thanks to you all.

    Unsprung (Slider elsewhere!)

  10. #10
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unsprung
    From what I've read, you have to be concered about lots more seconday complications like scleroderma and lupus. Since my minor variation really annoys me, I empathize with you!
    A few years ago, I scared myself silly reading all the on-line medical horror stories about these diseases... yes, my late-blooming Raynaud's may be a sign of things to come, but I'm happy to report that the bloodwork ordered by my rheumatologist showed me to be negative for lupus and schleroderma. Whew!! Again, I recommend that you find a rheumatologist and get the blood workup and evaluation. Do it for your own peace of mind. With the vast amount of info at our fingertips it is easy to perform a terrifying self diagnosis... Don't do it!! See the doc.

    Speaking of fingertips, here are a few shots that I took after riding home from work one recent chilly (60ish?) evening on my Honda sportbike. I know it's starting when the fingers start to go numb. Return from the dead will start as soon as I warm up, but my fingers can burn for a long time if it was a bad episode...

    OH! And as promised, I've been enjoying the Specialized Deflect gloves - give them a try!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unsprung
    Three weekends of leaf blowing has left me with a case of Raynauds Syndrome in my right index finger. I guess I am lucky to have it limited to that, but it really will be a problem this winter, since it gets white/green and very cold even indoors now. I am searching for the best glove solution.

    Some NEMBA posts have helped point me to some solutions, but big battery packs connected to gloves seem too heavy and awkward. Chem packs seems like the way to go, under fleece gloves to let them get the oxygen they need to work well. Water will be a problem, probably.

    Anyone got a solution that works well? TIA for any ideas.

    Unsprung
    try hand warmers & lobster-style gloves. i'd recommend a liner glove too (like Impy suggests) because you don't want to put the warmer packets directly against your skin. also make sure your gloves aren't too tight (this will cut off circulation and make your hands cold) and your hands aren't overheating (this will cause your hands to sweat, making the inside of the glove wet, and then your hands will get cold).

    i wore performance brand fleece windstopper gloves with a pair of pearl izumi windproof lobster-style shell gloves over top (no hand warmers though) this morning when the temps were in the mid 20s F and i was riding on the road (i'm guessing a wind chill in the teens when i was moving at 20-25 mph?) and my hands were toasty.

    i also heeded everyone's advice to keep the core warm and added an extra layer on top so i was wearing a short sleeve DeFeet base layer, a thermal NorthFace polypro, a fleece lined long sleeve jersey, and a wind vest. (yes, i felt like i was going off on an artic expedition).

    i also put toe warmers between the top of the toe of my shoe and my booties and my feet were as warm & comfy as they have ever been.

    for the first time ever it was a pleasure to ride outside in the winter.



    rt
    "where are you not going so fast?" (question asked to cyclist on a trainer)

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  12. #12
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    Serious answer

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Buy a rake.
    The first link from a Google search turned up this, http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-128.shtml
    Yes indeed, vibrating tools.

  13. #13
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    I’m going to revive this old thread since it seems to be the only one that specifically talks about hand protection for those that suffer from “Raynaud's phenomenon” (as I do). The hand photos above are a common entity (although I try not to let my condition ever get to that point). I have never been officially diagnosed with the condition but my father and aunt suffer from the same thing and I have dealt with long enough to know what it is.

    I also get it year round in temps up to 60ish (both indoors & outdoors). I understand the blood flow thing, my condition may be enhanced since my BPM averages in the 40s (<40 when I sleep). Obviously winter its worth for my hands and feet, as I type this inside my house it’s 73ºF and 40ish outside and both my hands & feet are cold (not numb) but tingling slightly.

    So anyhow, I am an active commuter and am in the market for some new gloves. I have tried various doubling of my regular half- full- finger riding gloves even pairing them with Adidas Climawarm on top, no luck (and the tight fit hurts and feels colder). I have used Goretex type gloves for trail work, etc. which I find restrict movement and make my hands too warm (sweaty). I live in the south where temps seldom ever go below mid 20s. Still it will get in the teens with the windchill on morning commutes.

    I am looking for a mid-range glove that will work well both on- & off- road and while I run (I jog a lot too) and if I am out doing trail work, etc. Anyone with Raynaud's that has experience, please advise. Thanks.

  14. #14
    I don't huck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixie whiskey View Post
    I’m going to revive this old thread since it seems to be the only one that specifically talks about hand protection for those that suffer from “Raynaud's phenomenon” (as I do). The hand photos above are a common entity (although I try not to let my condition ever get to that point). I have never been officially diagnosed with the condition but my father and aunt suffer from the same thing and I have dealt with long enough to know what it is.

    I also get it year round in temps up to 60ish (both indoors & outdoors). I understand the blood flow thing, my condition may be enhanced since my BPM averages in the 40s (<40 when I sleep). Obviously winter its worth for my hands and feet, as I type this inside my house it’s 73ºF and 40ish outside and both my hands & feet are cold (not numb) but tingling slightly.

    So anyhow, I am an active commuter and am in the market for some new gloves. I have tried various doubling of my regular half- full- finger riding gloves even pairing them with Adidas Climawarm on top, no luck (and the tight fit hurts and feels colder). I have used Goretex type gloves for trail work, etc. which I find restrict movement and make my hands too warm (sweaty). I live in the south where temps seldom ever go below mid 20s. Still it will get in the teens with the windchill on morning commutes.

    I am looking for a mid-range glove that will work well both on- & off- road and while I run (I jog a lot too) and if I am out doing trail work, etc. Anyone with Raynaud's that has experience, please advise. Thanks.
    I have that malady as well and I will try some other things this year including some circulation supplements, but keeping the core warm is key. As well, the new heated grips from A'ME are killer for keeping the digits warm. Not cheap, but allows for a lighter glove to be worn.
    Blog Ramblings
    West Coast writer for twentynineinches.com

  15. #15
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    The heated grips sound like the Cadillac of solutions, luckily I am not to that point yet. For me really loose gloves are the solution for skiing and biking. Any tightness or stiffness will kill my circulation no matter how expensive/high tech they are. My favourites were an older simpler version of these.

    https://grandoe.mwrc.net/images/dyn/...BK-BK-400w.jpg

    If I could find the right shells I would try these.

    High Loft Glove - Gloves - Black Diamond Equipment, Ltd.

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