Gloves for winter riding- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Gloves for winter riding

    Every year I try new gloves, to try and combat my ott need for something extra warm around my fingers.. and I fail.. stock pile of them building up and I keep getting disappointed despite the what their labels say..

    My hands get really very cold when the temp is around 10*c so at 0*c they have real serious problems..

    Has anyone come across a set of gloves that give Arctic performance but still allow some finger movement for bike control.

  2. #2
    Birdman aka JMJ
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    Specialized

    I had a few pairs of Specialized neoprene/leather/terrycloth gloves that were great for winter riding. Not sure if they still make them. Also tried the lobster paw model, as well as some from MEC and Louis Garneau.

    Good luck - JMJ

  3. #3
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    Check out a Nordic Ski shop. XC Skiing is more aerobic with better blood flow to your hands and feet so look at the heavy weight options. I have a set of Lobster claws that I use on the bike. A couple of different companies offer these. I have noticed that Swix is making some nice heavier weight but close fitting gloves this year, not that they've been bad before. It's just they look and feel really nice.

  4. #4
    The Beast Breathes
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    Don't take it from me, I can almost ride winter with no gloves (living in Canada for 25 years does that to you) but I like the 661 Transitions. If you need extra protection slip some Time RXS's.
    Good luck with that, mister 300-Mile Turn Radius.

  5. #5
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    Last winter I got fed up with spending money on expensive gloves that didn't quite do the job (I live in Wisconsin and will ride until its about 15-20 degrees Fahrneheit, depending on windchill). I went and bought a pair of $15 generic poofy thinsulate gloves from Walmart, and I was shocked at how well they worked--better than any of the expensive gloves I'd tried in the past. (although it took some getting used to for braking and shifting!).
    Don't take anything I say seriously.

  6. #6
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    I'm still searching as well. Tried various cycling-specific gloves along with several ski-snowboard gloves. It doesn't even get that cold here and no matter what I wear my fingers are numb after a ~35 min commute. Maybe I just have poor circulation? I'm thinking I'll have to try mittens next.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by speed_bump
    I'm still searching as well. Tried various cycling-specific gloves along with several ski-snowboard gloves. It doesn't even get that cold here and no matter what I wear my fingers are numb after a ~35 min commute. Maybe I just have poor circulation? I'm thinking I'll have to try mittens next.
    Your just not commuting fast/hard enough

  8. #8
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    The Sealskin goles have always worked really well for me in the depths of a British winter, still give good control but keep the cold and wet out.

  9. #9
    And I'm out.
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    I'm with deesta on this one: The SealSkins are a great glove for most conditions, but if you do full polar riding like I do during a Quebec winter then your best choice is to go for 2 pairs at the same time. I wear my XC skiing gloves with an outer waterproof mitt over it. Make sure that you have free air space between your gloves, this air will heat up a bit and provide a bit more warmth than the gloves will if they are in contact...... Leading to another problem: slippery feeling grip / glove interface.....

  10. #10
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    In the end I decided to invest in a set of heated mittens these are great (pricey) but worth it. Even when not heated, they work really well and provide enough finger movement for gears and brakes and I love them.. There cheaper but theses seem to be the best compromise between what was available.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by deesta
    The Sealskin goles have always worked really well for me in the depths of a British winter, still give good control but keep the cold and wet out.
    +1

  12. #12
    Squishy Fishy
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    Ice Armor Mitts----slight pain to shift, but I use them on and off road. My hands are toasty warm here and I ride in 8 degree weather here in good ole Wisconsin. heres a link--

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...rid=0123456789

  13. #13
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    things that will help

    1.) cheap snowmobile pogies and thin gloves

    2.) switch to thick foam grips or road bar tape wrapped into grips in winter

    3.) lobster claw gloves. no downside if you two finger the brake levers and run sram twist or trigger shifters. a tiny bit annoying with shimano trigger shifters, but better than cold hands.

  14. #14
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    have you ever tried this

    http://www.sealskinz.com/cgi-bin/psP...,0,0,1%7C53%7C

    selaskinz has alot of available models , specific to mtb , i don't have any , but i'm thinking of buying a pair, winter is very harsh this year , they look very good
    Sai da cama e vem para a lama !!!!!

  15. #15
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    just rode 2 hours @ -15 C today with pearl izumi cyclones under some of the Sugoi lobster claws and my hands were too warm! My hands will never be cold again!

  16. #16
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    I spend a whopping $2 on my gloves and my hands are warm. Granted, my rides have only been down to about the mid 20's, but they stay warm the whole ride.

    I wear two pair of thin gloves. Each pair costs about a buck.

    I wear these, with these over top for grip.

    I've ridden with people that have $30-35 winter gloves from bike shops who complain their finger tips are cold.

    Certainly there's nothing special about the gloves I have, it's just because I'm wearing two layers that they work.

  17. #17
    www.derbyrims.com
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    This year I started using these sportbike textile gloves from Alpinestar. About $40. Usually starting rides with long climbs with my normal full fingered mountain bike gloves while I make enough heat. Once heading back down and sweaty windchill takes over, I stop and switch to these on cold days, and add other head and body layers. These sportbike gloves are made for good lever reach and handlebar comfort, nice an toasty, breath pretty well, and fairly waterproof, and can be washed in the machine too.

    http://www.kneedraggers.com/details/...cid=7944260713

  18. #18
    Ride More - Suffer Less
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    If you can find them the Race Face Aquanot gloves have served me well for several years now...

  19. #19
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    I've read it somewhere that using a pair of latex/vinyl gloves under your regular gloves keeps your hands warm during cold winter riding. Not sure though, never tested it, Socal weather doesn't get that cold during winter.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aron_F
    I've read it somewhere that using a pair of latex/vinyl gloves under your regular gloves keeps your hands warm during cold winter riding. Not sure though, never tested it, Socal weather doesn't get that cold during winter.
    Holy cow, I wrote a book again. Well, now that I wasted all that time writing it, I hope something in here helps somebody out there.


    When I wear latex gloves for other reasons (oil changes on cars and stuff like that), I have to wear a cotton liner to prevent the sweat from making wearing them unbearably uncomfortable, so your suggestion struck me as terrible. But you know, it is true that as soon as you sweat into most gloves, the insulation is rendered near useless, so wearing waterproof gloves as liners could completely prevent that mistake. I guess I am saying that sweaty warm hands would be better than frostbitten ones. When the chances of breaking through an ice crust and getting wet feet are high during the early winter riding season, I sometimes bring a spare pair of socks and 4 plastic bags on group rides. That way, if someone gets a wet foot or two, they can take off their wet socks, put on a dry sock and 2 plastic bags, and put their wet boot back on and keep riding.

    For me, there are much better fixes for cold hands than the horribly uncomfortable to wear while exercising latex gloves. My approach probably sounds way more complicated when typed than it really is in practice. I ride in Maine 3-6 days per week all winter long, and this is what works for me:

    I use a liner glove and an outer glove. I have 3 different outers depending on the outdoor temperature at the start of the ride (I used to get by just fine with only one), and two different warmth level liners.

    The liner is picked for minimum packing size, maximum wicking, and maximum breath-ability (my favorite light liner right now is 80% polyester, 20% lycra and came from walmart for $1.40 in a two pack, so don't go thinking I spent a ton on appropriate clothes ). I also have some ragg wool gloves that are awesome as liners for any old gauntleted windproof shell down to -30F or so.

    The outer is picked for wind resistance, breath-ability, wicking, and insulation. My favorites right now are all lobster claw gloves and that isn't because I live in Maine. I've got 3 different pairs and the warmest (but unfortunately least breathable) is the Pearl Izumi Barrier iQ (with cheap liners, these are good down to about -10F).

    Rule number one is cardio..... wait, wrong rule list. Rule number one for staying warm on a long ride is "don't sweat". If I find my hands starting to feel too warm, I will ditch the liners. If they are still too warm, I will go to the liner only without the shell. As long as I bring the right gloves for the temperatures and don't sweat into the gloves, there is a solution that will keep my hands warm. Rule number two is probably "don't wear anything tight" (hurts circulation, which is your heat source). This goes for velcro sleeve closures and gauntlet closures as well as tight gloves. Rule number three is probably "don't let your fingers or toes get cold." Something many people may not think about is this: If your fingers get cold, that slows your circulation. Slowing your circulation reduces the heat getting to your fingers, which makes them colder, and so on. So, if your fingers get cold, just doing something to warm them up (like removing your gloves and putting your bare hands in your armpits inside your jacket) might fix the problem for good, where even warmer gloves might not once your fingers have gotten cold.

    Bad experiences have caused me to always bring a backup headlight (even on daytime rides) and a backup pair of gloves in case I wasn't paying attention and let my gloves get wet with sweat.

    Rule number four might be "cotton sucks." Lots of different materials work, but I will only wear 100% wool socks (preferably ragg wool without elastics) because If I sweat in them, they will still be somewhat warm, and they will quickly wick the moisture up my ankle where it can evaporate. Careful when shopping, "Merino wool" is in fashion now so it is pretty common to have a big label that says "merino wool gloves/socks/whatever" and a content label that says "5% merino wool, 90% cotton..."

    If I ride with other people, I will also bring "working on stuff" gloves to change into before doing repairs, since I will inevitably be the guy working on someone else's bike, and my warm gloves don't allow the dexterity to work on stuff, and my cold, greasy hands don't warm up well inside my warm gloves.

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