Full face helmet or no?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Full face helmet or no?

    Hey all,

    Still healing from a jaw operation last week (was broken) and am anxiously awaiting getting back on the bike. Should be back on in about 2 weeks, but before then I want to make sure I have enough protection for my face when riding because falling on my face (jaw especially) could have some pretty dire consequences, so I'm ready to wear a full face helmet.

    A friend rides with a MET Parachute helmet (http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=17687) with a detachable chin guard, but I'm wondering if this will even help for potential falls to the face. I've read that on tough impacts, this helmet isn't as effective as an MX full face helmet. I'd rather avoid getting an MX full face helmet simply because I do a combination of AM/XC riding (pretty technical at times) and that may be uncomfortable for what I do.

    Any of you guys have experience wearing full face helmets or the MET Parachute? Any advice you guys have??

    Thanks!!
    Kevin

  2. #2
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    I would go for a full face (something like the Giro Remedy can be had for a decent price). While I have no experience with the MET Parachute, it wouldn't give me the same confidence that a full face would. And since it sounds like the safety of your jaw is your main concern - do yourself a favour and get the full face. Being a little uncomfortable is much better than risking a serious injury and besides, you'll get used to wearing the full face and after a while it may not feel so uncomfortable. You could always buy an XC lid as well, for when you're doing XC.

  3. #3
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    Go for the full face and when you are doing XC go for the more traditional. Picking gravel out of your chin is no fun at all.

  4. #4
    Five is right out
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    There's at least one recent (ie in the last week) thread that discusses the MET, with accounts from people who have fallen on them and what sort of protection they provided. And a slew of criticisms from armchair pundits who have never used them.

    If you run a search for Met Parachue or Casco Viper, you can find the thread pretty easy, as welll as a bunch of slightly older ones.

  5. #5
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    Wow thanks for the quick response guys, this is really helpful ...

    Some new names I came across that definitely look like better buys to me:
    - Giro Remedy
    - Casco Viper
    - Specialized Deviant
    - Bell Bellistic
    - Rockgardn Warbird (http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...rd+Helmet.aspx)

    You guys know of any others I should consider that are under $120? Will let you know if I come across anything else ... may want to go to the LBS to make sure these fit.

    Thanks!
    Kev

  6. #6
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    The new 661 Comp II would be a good budget choice. It's fairly light and is well ventilated.

  7. #7
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    If your head overheating is a concern, the Remedy is probably not a great option. It's comfortable, to be sure, but the ventilation is a bit lacking. Good for DH, where you are taking it off after 10 to 20 minutes to ride the lift. I also use mine for the occasional FR session. For all mountain, better look elsewhere.

  8. #8
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    I just picked up a Bell Drop '09 which can be had from JensonUSA for $58. Haven't ridden with it yet, so I cannot tell you the heat levels. I'll try and report as to that after this weekends 24 mile 52 deg F ride. It is rated for DH use, so the chin guard is rated for an impact more than a regular CPSC(?) rated helmet.

    So yes, in your situation I'd definitely get a higher rated full-face (ASTM-1952 for DH).

  9. #9
    The Unaffiliated
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    I haven't ridden with one, but the Specialized Deviant is the most breathable LOOKING full face helmet I have come across.

  10. #10
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    full face will afford the most protection for sure but ventilation is the small sacrifice. I use a THE Industries One. It is fairly light and you can find good prices online. I do like the opening on their helmets because it seems wider for better peripheral vision with or without eye protection. I only use it for bmx tracks but used it a few times when it was really cold out on the trail. Ventilation is for sure an issue if you're doing quite a bit of pedaling but your peace of mind is key to your riding flow.

    I've tried the Met and although i didn't get to "test" the mouth guard literally, having used a real full face with bmx and moto, I just did not feel at all confident with it relative to how i ride with a real one on.

  11. #11
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    I bought a Specialized Deviant helmet a few months ago. I use it for all my rides except if I'm commuting or spending a lot of time on the road between trails. I think it's very comfortable, and doesn't feel much more cumbersome than my Trek Zone XC lid. I usually forget its even on until I try to get a drink of water or eat a snack and find a piece of plastic in the way... By the way, a typical trail ride for me is 10-15 miles of XC singletrack with a few decent sized jumps here and there.

    I've already had the chance to wear my Deviant on a few 90+ degree days, and I didn't have much trouble. My cheeks got warm, but the rest of my head stayed well ventilated. No problems with re-breathing the air I just exhaled even at slow technical climbing speed.

    The only time I can see myself not wearing my FF on the trail is on a really long ride (3-4h+) or during an XC race if there aren't any serious rocks or technical terrain. Otherwise, the added protetion for my jaw and teeth justifies the minor cost in comfort.

    That's my take on the issue...

  12. #12
    NOT Team Sanchez
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    the extra confidence of having a FF is very much worth the extra weight and heat.....I really like my Remedy and THE for everything I do.
    I like bikes.

  13. #13
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    Appreciate the help all. Plenty to work with here.

    One last question -- I don't think this is a problem but can't hurt to ask: Since I never intend to ride with dirt goggles, should i avoid any of the FF helmets that are goggle-compatible (deviant)? Any drawbacks in buying an FF that is goggle compatible or should i look for more compact ones that aren't meant for goggle use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Turtle01
    I just picked up a Bell Drop '09 which can be had from JensonUSA for $58. Haven't ridden with it yet, so I cannot tell you the heat levels. I'll try and report as to that after this weekends 24 mile 52 deg F ride. It is rated for DH use, so the chin guard is rated for an impact more than a regular CPSC(?) rated helmet.

    So yes, in your situation I'd definitely get a higher rated full-face (ASTM-1952 for DH).
    Turtle, would be interested in hearing what you think of the bell drop when youve used it. I see it's a BMX ff helmet, but certainly looks like it can take a beating.

    Kev

  14. #14
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    I've never used my Deviant with goggles (don't have any actually). Just make sure your glasses have thin/flexible arms. My Oakley X Metal XX doesn't fit under the helmet very well. Most plastic frame Oakleys I tried on were also a very tight fit. I got Crosshair wire frame shades, and those fit just fine.

  15. #15
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    The Remedy is quite a large looking helmet when compared to others, and it is quite hot to wear, but mine is tops as far as I'm concerned, as its saved my face on a couple of occations now - full face is the way to go. Get yourself a normal trail riding lid for your less enthusiastic or technical rides - I have a Fox Flux for those duties.

    Both my riding buddies had the Met, both now wear THE composites, which look tha shizzle.

  16. #16
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    Hey tittiot, I got to ride this weekend with the Bell Drop. It was only about 50 deg F. The helmet did get a little warm, nothing that I think I couldn't get used to. Oh, it's listed as a DH/BMX helmet with the ASTM-1952 rating. It fit, felt, and stayed put awsomely. The only negative thing I can really say is that putting a hydration hose under the chin guard takes a little practice, but not impossible.

  17. #17
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    tittiot, another update. I rode a local shorter trail yesterday (9.1 miles/1:10hrs) with all my armor on with the Bell Drop. The temperature was closer to 60 deg F and the helmet didn't "feel" as hot/warm as my first run with it (23.6 miles/4hrs). I think my body and head are adjusting to the feeling of something different. I don't think that I had much if any more sweat rolling off of my head that with a half shell with a bandana under it. The fit is soo much better around my head with the Drop than any other half shell style helmet.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tittiot
    You guys know of any others I should consider that are under $120? Will let you know if I come across anything else ... may want to go to the LBS to make sure these fit.

    Thanks!
    Kev
    Kev,

    If you go to your LBS, try on a bunch of helmets, and find the one you are looking for then show them some appreciation and buy it from your LBS. It costs $ for a shop to have helmets in stock, employees to answer your questions, and a store to house them in. However, if your LBS shows no interest in carrying the types of equipment you need then certainly look for the best deal you can find from a reputable online shop.
    Can't keep track anymore - Giant, Santa Cruz, Pivot, Yeti, Norco, Salsa, Intense - if it rolls on dirt I like it :thumbsup:

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    Kev,

    If you go to your LBS, try on a bunch of helmets, and find the one you are looking for then show them some appreciation and buy it from your LBS. It costs $ for a shop to have helmets in stock, employees to answer your questions, and a store to house them in. However, if your LBS shows no interest in carrying the types of equipment you need then certainly look for the best deal you can find from a reputable online shop.
    I always want to support my LBS, but they never have what I need, apart from Hope kit.
    The problem with hope kit is it never breaks!!!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by tittiot
    I see it's a BMX ff helmet
    what?
    avoid Manitou forks at all costs... they have no souls...

  21. #21
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    I saw the BMX reference as well. The Bell Drop box actually says "BMX/Downhill" with CPSC and ASTM certifications listed.

  22. #22
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    It's definitely worth the extra heat for the added face protection, IMHO....especialy in your situation. I ride with a Giro Remedy on ALL of my rides....including ones with a lot of climbing. It definitely gets warm in there, but not unbearable.
    I also recently bought a 2010 Deviant 2, but haven't gotten to ride with it yet (just had a baby girl). Bought it with the expectation that it'll be cooler than my Remedy for the coming hot summer months. IMHO, you can't go wrong with either of these helmets...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToneyRiver
    Go for the full face and when you are doing XC go for the more traditional. Picking gravel out of your chin is no fun at all.
    Agree completely.

    I took a nasty fall off a jump several years ago, hit the ground with my face, and now have a nice scar about an inch below my eyes.

    I'm not really a fan of the MET Parachute or any detachable chinguard, - the detachable bit just looks too flimsy!
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  24. #24
    El Gato Malo
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    As a side note, the Remedy also has a snap buckle closure for the chin strap as opposed to the double D-rings in other FF helmets. Makes securing the chin strap a lot easier especially with gloved hands.

  25. #25
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    I have this http://www.xsportsprotective.com/six...on-carbon.html but in black. Its light and is very comfortable. Wish they had more in storage. Hope this helps

  26. #26
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    I didnt broke my jaws but a few teeth were broken. Fullface all the way no detachable fakes. When buyig FF take googles with you and try them on before buying FF.

    Get wel soon

  27. #27
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    Do not get the Met parachute. The front face guard is almost useless and in fact may cause damage by digging into your face in a crash, since it is very soft. You are not going to get full face protection with something like that. The Specialized Deviant has proper protection and is pretty lightweight. If that is too expensive for you get the 661 Comp II.

  28. #28
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    I convinced that anyone who actually sees and compares them will find the Deviant 2 has no competition from the standpoint of ventilation and impact protection equal to anyone. And as much as I'm anti factory (usually rebranded) merchandise, I find the Deviant to be an excellent value even at full price.
    Of course my LBS did not have the one I want in stock so this is a factory picture, mine will have the purple areass repainted Specialized Red
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Full face helmet or no?-deviant2.jpg  

    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 29 lbs sold
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

  29. #29
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    I should also add that I raced motocross for 15 years and can vouch for the added protection full face offers. My first bicycle face plant was at Snowshoe wearing my Arai motocross helmet and while my face felt like it was all cut up in reality there was zero blood. A few months later I did my second face plant while wearing my Giro MB helmet and there was considerable blood, swelling and discomfort.
    Getting ready for a July Whistler trip so the Deviant will be worn from now on
    2011 Canfield ONE 200mm DH 35 pounds
    2010 Specialized Pitch 29 lbs sold
    Wife: 2009 Canfield ONE also 29 lbs

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