Flat pedals with 5.10 shoes for XC/AM- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Flat pedals with 5.10 shoes for XC/AM

    I am currently using some old XT clipless pedals and specialized SPD shoes, I find that I unclip for more technical sections so I'm thinking I might as well switch to some flat pedals and sticky shoes.

    My concern is regarding the stiffness of the sole, I am going to be doing some significant climbing so I'd like the sole to be relatively stiff. Will the 5.10 Impact 2's fit this requirement? how are you other riders that switched from riding clipless to flats doing when it comes to climbing?

    I'm either going to go with Tioga MX Pro's or Crank Bros 50/50, any other recommendations pedalwise?

  2. #2
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    I've been using flats for A.M. riding for several years, and I use 5.10 impact shoes. Because most platform pedals have a large surface, shoe stiffness is significantly less of an issue, really not an issue at all. I too do a lot of climbing.
    I would recommend a pedal with pins that are easily replaceable.
    ****

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    I am currently using some old XT clipless pedals and specialized SPD shoes, I find that I unclip for more technical sections so I'm thinking I might as well switch to some flat pedals and sticky shoes.

    My concern is regarding the stiffness of the sole, I am going to be doing some significant climbing so I'd like the sole to be relatively stiff. Will the 5.10 Impact 2's fit this requirement? how are you other riders that switched from riding clipless to flats doing when it comes to climbing?

    I'm either going to go with Tioga MX Pro's or Crank Bros 50/50, any other recommendations pedalwise?
    Yeah, 5.10s are nice and stiff, but I was using Vans which were fine too. As long as the shoes aren't really soft they should be fine.

    Pedals, if you can find em, Wellgo Mags - replaceable pins and they only weigh 380g, they just aren't as durable as some heavier pedals. (the magnesium can bend/break if you smack rocks hard enough)

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the suggestions. Which pedals have the largest surface area? When I used to ride stock platform pedals with toe clips and sneakers in the 90's I hated the flexing of the sole around the pedal, I see how a pedal with a larger surface area will eliminate that issue. I like the Wellgo Mag's since I would not be too rough on them and they're cheap

  5. #5
    househusband
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    I'm another recent convert to flats, having been clipless all my lift until now. Have taken to it pretty well and find myself cornering much faster now that I feel more 'planted' within the bike. Started off using DMR V8's, but a few weeks ago I got some Wellgo B25's - so much more grip! Am currently using some Duffs skate shoes, but have some 5.10's on order; tried someone's on in the car park and was amazed by the grip they offered!

    I've found that shoe stiffness isn't as much of an issue with flat pedals as you tend to 'grip' the pedal the central part of your foot rather than connecting with it through a cleat at the ball of your foot - if you catch my drift!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    Thanks for the suggestions. Which pedals have the largest surface area? When I used to ride stock platform pedals with toe clips and sneakers in the 90's I hated the flexing of the sole around the pedal, I see how a pedal with a larger surface area will eliminate that issue. I like the Wellgo Mag's since I would not be too rough on them and they're cheap
    Wellgo Mags (and their other models) are about the right size, plenty big enough for most riding, way different than the old-school stuff. You can get bigger pedals, but for trail riding they can have clearance problems (roots/rocks/trees etc)

    Please tell me where you can buy Wellgo Mags cheap
    In that case, get some, they have standard replacable pins, and after 3+ years of riding my bearings are still tight and smooth.

    If you like the 5.10 shoes, get em. The sole is plenty stiff and flex won't be an issue, no matter what pedal you get.

  7. #7
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    These are the ones I found:

    http://store.airbomb.com/Itemdesc.asp?ic=PD1014

    not sure if this is the lowest price you can get em for but 53 bucks doesn't sound too bad.

    I'll continue looking around and will post anything I come across that's cheaper.

  8. #8
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    Found some better on Ebay

    http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Wellgo-MG-1-...QQcmdZViewItem

    40 bucks is going to be tough to beat.

  9. #9
    Mojo0115
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    I switch to flats for downhilling, but when I tried it for XC/AM I hated it since I lost all my upstroke power. I would try pedalling through technical stuff on the climbs and would constantly lift my feet off the pedals. I probably could have given it much more of a chance to adapt to but I still prefer clipless for All Mountain riding. But that is just me.

    On my Downhill Bike I love my Easton Flatboy pedals and 5.10's.

  10. #10
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    What type of shin protection are you guys using, I'm looking for something that will be as light and flexible as possible. I just don't want to get my shins shredded, not doing anything too hardcore.

  11. #11
    IPAs make me wanna puke.
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    This is precisely the set-up I just switched to. I went with Transition Stepdown pedals. It took one day to acclimate, but now I'm having a great time.

    I switched for the same reason you mentioned (I want to start riding a few things that are a bit too sketch for my skill level being clipped in). Ill probably go back to clipless next year, but for now, I don't regret the switch at all.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    What type of shin protection are you guys using, I'm looking for something that will be as light and flexible as possible. I just don't want to get my shins shredded, not doing anything too hardcore.
    I'm using the Roach FR shin guards and i wouldnt really reccomend them for climbing. i usually carry them on my pack until i climb to the top and put the on for comming down through the technical stuff.

  13. #13
    Noo Zeelander
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    I am using these the Azonic Accelerator with 5 10 shoes >>>>

    17065.jpg


    I find them great and they are also light for AM riding but tough as hell !!1
    I too was spd sort of guy until my riding skill improved to the point that I was riding very technical terrain this meant being clipped in was not an option ...It has taken me about 5 rides to get used to the different feet position and different uphill pedaling feel .
    I went out last night with my mates and beat them all up the hill.. they mostly ride clipless pedals.
    I do still use platform clipless pedals about 25 % of the time on uphill intensive rides but slowly I will become a 100% flat pedal man.
    Move along please ..... Nothing to see here !!


    http://www.nelsonmountainbikeclub.org.nz/

  14. #14
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    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^
    those poedals arnt goiod at allll for the buck, they literly didnt make me feet stick to the pedal at all and i wore down the pins
    GETOFFTHEBRAKESYAFAIRY

  15. #15
    HotHB
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    Im rocking Easton Flatboys, and 5.10 shoes. No complaints here.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    What type of shin protection are you guys using, I'm looking for something that will be as light and flexible as possible. I just don't want to get my shins shredded, not doing anything too hardcore.
    661 4x4s, and 2x4s for the arms.

  17. #17
    Enlightened
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    Wellgo MG-1 magnesiums
    now - 5.10 Impact 2's (grabs like flypaper - great for jumping but too sticky on the trail?)
    previously - generic Vans (liked these better for all around riding actually)

    Roach FR legpads on all the time


    In terms of power delivery, platforms work well if you tend to spin (breakpoint 90rpm?). If you aren't much of a spinner then the upstroke helps smooth out your power delivery and helps manage traction/balance a lot better. And on flats on the technical uphill portions, if you lose cadence, there's no upstroke to help you recover so you have to be more conscious of the lines you take... and don't forget your bigger am bike might also not be as efficient a pedalling platform as a pure xc bike too.

  18. #18
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    A couple that look interesting....

    Two that have caught my eye, both not cheap.

    Syncros Mental:

    http://www.syncros.com/pedals.htm

    DarkCycles Arachnid

    http://www.darkcycles.com/arachnid.htm

    regards,

    michael

  19. #19
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    Once you get use to A.M. riding in flats, all the little tricks you learn to compensate for the less efficient pedaling become automatic. I frequently outclimb less experienced riders riding bikes 10 pounds lighter than mine. And I rarely lose contact with these pedals:

    ****

  20. #20
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    Have you guys tried Time or Crank Bros platform clipless? I use Truvativ Holzfeller pedals and 5.10's for my M3 but on my BLT for all mountain??? NOT a chance! (Times for me) It's not that difficult to get out of them or snap back in and I find them to be far better than the Shimano "XC style" clipless and their knock-offs.

    To each his own,

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  21. #21
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    I use CB Mallets, and they are good for certain situations, but you can't ride tech sections unclipped.
    Once you clip out, your shoes will have a hard time trying to stay on the pedals.

  22. #22

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    I just got the 5050 xx with 5.10 impact 2 shoes and love them the pedals are pretty light and the shoes are comfy and sticky. I ordered from go-ride and they gave a pretty good deal on them.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    I am currently using some old XT clipless pedals and specialized SPD shoes, I find that I unclip for more technical sections so I'm thinking I might as well switch to some flat pedals and sticky shoes.

    My concern is regarding the stiffness of the sole, I am going to be doing some significant climbing so I'd like the sole to be relatively stiff. Will the 5.10 Impact 2's fit this requirement? how are you other riders that switched from riding clipless to flats doing when it comes to climbing?

    I'm either going to go with Tioga MX Pro's or Crank Bros 50/50, any other recommendations pedalwise?

    Don't get the Cranky 50 /50's, the bearings start clicking after a short time.

    The pedals that have proven the most reliable for me are the Azonic A-frames. I bash these against lots of rocks and they are very tough. Team them up with some 5-10 Impacts and you are good to go.

    The main problem with most pedals is that the damn bearings don't last very long. I've tested quite a few different brands and found that the best pedals are those that have well sealed bearings that can take abuse.

    Cheap brands with icky little bearings or crappy seals can't take the pace for long and die fairly quickly.

    Avoid the cheap brands unless you plan to replace them every few months.


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainman
    Don't get the Cranky 50 /50's, the bearings start clicking after a short time.

    The pedals that have proven the most reliable for me are the Azonic A-frames. I bash these against lots of rocks and they are very tough. Team them up with some 5-10 Impacts and you are good to go.

    The main problem with most pedals is that the damn bearings don't last very long. I've tested quite a few different brands and found that the best pedals are those that have well sealed bearings that can take abuse.

    Cheap brands with icky little bearings or crappy seals can't take the pace for long and die fairly quickly.

    Avoid the cheap brands unless you plan to replace them every few months.


    R.


    Even the 5050 xx sealed bearings have problems? Just wondering cause I just got a pair so far so good but I havent had them that long

  25. #25

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    I've been using CB 50x/50x for a couple months now. Absolutely 0 problems or any type of noise from them. Best pedals I've ever used.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Los11
    Even the 5050 xx sealed bearings have problems? Just wondering cause I just got a pair so far so good but I havent had them that long
    Well, all I can say about the 50 / 50 XX pedals is what I found with the pair I tested myself. Around three months the bearings in one of the pedals started clicking... I re-greased them as per the manufacturers instructions, the click went away for a few days, then returned again.

    I kill pedals fairly easily for some reason. I don't know why, but I just do. Sure, I bash them against rocks on the trails I ride, but so does everyone else, so that's not uncommon. I'm not picking on the Crank Bros alone, it happens to a lot of different pedals I use.

    What i'm saying is that of all the pedals i've tried, the Azonic A Frames have been the most reliable so far.

    The bearings in most pedals is the weak link. A lot of pedals have weak crappy bearings and / or are badly designed. The bearings seals have to be good too, to stop the ingress of grit, dust, water etc...


    Anyways, go with whatever pedal you want to. Sometimes you can get lucky...


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  27. #27

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    flats n the ups and downs

    Yeah I've used flats (V8s, Wellgos) and never have any problems keeping up with anyone anywhere.

    Using 5.10 shoes, guess it is the wide pedal platform, variety of foot positions for climbing, and maybe the thickness of the sole all meaning flex doesn't seem to sap power. BUT they are a bit heavy, I can really feel the weight, especially say in a spin class in a gym where there's not much else to think about (except the girls in front). Another potential problem with flat pedals is you can over develop your quads and start to pull your patella off; clip ins are supposed let you use the hamstring more.

    Im glad people are still using flats, so many less silly injurys.

  28. #28
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    After years on clipless, I tried flats for a few months a year ago (Easton Flatboys & 5.10s). I REALLY wanted to like these, but decided to go back to clipless for the following reasons:
    - my feet kept flying off the pedals while climbing rocky terrain. Even after a lot of practicing "cleaning s**t", and even with the extremely sticky 5.10 shoes.
    - fast descents on rocky terrain were much more frightening with the flats - I was constantly fighting my feet's wish to fly off the pedals as well. Even after learning to push forward with the front foot and backward with the rear foot.
    - shin protection is HOT in the summer (and that's with pretty comfy 661 race pads)
    - After getting 959 pedals and putting the release tension almost fully open, I am finding myself releasing properly ALL the time without thinking about it and on the gnarliest situations. (although my prior experience with CB Candies was quite the opposite).

    Bunny hop technique did improve significantly though.

  29. #29
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    I'm still trying to conquer my fear of clipless for technical sections, but I am getting better. It is sometimes safer to be clipped in even though your body is screaming "hell no!". I'm worst at rough switch backs on cliff/steep hill edges, hard to not picture myself flying off still attached to my descending bike. It is also trickier to unclip when you have the seat down and your weight off the seat, which is generally how people ride DH. That said, I'm going to keep trying because I want to improve my clipless confidence for xc racing.

    Flats-wise, like Rainman, I have found Azonic A-frames to be great. I've been using my pair for 5 years, still smooth, and tough (rock strike! no worries).

    Still, if you need to climb to do your DH/AM riding clips make it a lot easier.

  30. #30

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    Is anyone familiar with Odyssey Cielencki Pedal? I m planning to get one and does everyone use shin guard for those sharp flat pedal?
    i've been using flat my whole life but my pedal is the old skool type, not very big and not very grippy when touches mud. So am hunting for something more hardcore as our riding condition here is very muddy.

  31. #31
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    I rode flats for years as a kid (10 to... 15) but now I've ridden clips for a year and a half on my Enduro for AM (i'm 17 now)

    I swore by clips when people would ask because I loved the control they gave me over the bike over rocky sections, jumps, etc.
    I also loved the efficiency going up hills.
    But on my dirt jump bike, I will only use flats (doing 20 foot gaps 12 feet in the air off steep lips would just be plain silly on clips).
    So i can switch between quite easily.

    But when I threw flats onto my Enduro like 8 months back for one ride, i missed the clips and the control they gave me.

    Now, however, I'm a much faster rider and am riding more like a downhiller, looking to drift turns etc.
    Now even though many DH racers ride clips, I see tons with 5.10s who can just throw a foot out easily to drift etc.

    I'm really considering trying flats again, and will probably invest in some 5.10s and nice platforms and really give them a try.

    Most people seem to go to flats because they are scared of not being able to get out on technical sections, but I'm the opposite; I'm scared to come off the platforms in rocky sections, but I really want to throw feet out on the corners and also not to develop "bad habits" related to clipless that I've heard on many other threads.

    Anybody feel the same way about switching and have words of advice?

  32. #32
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    Wink

    I'm on DMR V8's and Converse boots and I've got no complaints at all. One of the V8's isn't rotating so well as it used to despite regular greasing but they are cheap enough that I'm not to bothered if I have to replace them every year or so. Again the Converses are cheap enough not to worry about replacing them every now and then. I've never had any problem with my feet being thrown off the pedals but I think I'll try the longer "Terror Pins" when I get the next set.

    I might get my elf a set of 5.10's now that you can get the rennie or Hill replicas, I'm not a name snob, but the gothiness ot the black high tops always put me off.

    I usualy wear Race Face DH pads, hot I know but great for slipped pedals and thrown up rocks. On hot days I've thought about strapping them on to my pack but I reckon I'm more likely to slip a pedal and mash my shin going up than down.

  33. #33

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    whatever happened to odyssey black widows?

    i've still got a pair on my hardtail and i love them. Well up until the point i miss the pedals and they spin round and take chunks out of my leg.

  34. #34
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    If you're feet are bouncing off the pedals in rock terrain you're riding wrong. I can pretty much guarantee that your not bending your legs enough, or using them to absorb the shock on the trail. I use flats on my FR and AM bikes and have no trouble with my feet bouncing off the bike....unless I get bucked, but that's a whole different situation. People need to remember that your arms and legs are you first order of suspension, not your fork and shock.

  35. #35
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    I get the leg bending for rocky terrain as long as you are descending. My problem is bouncing off when climbing on rocky terrain - when my legs are pushing strong and thus much less flexible. The other issue is getting bucked when descending terrain full of baby head rocks. How do handle these?

  36. #36
    M070R-M0U7H FR3NCHI3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetta_mike
    If you're feet are bouncing off the pedals in rock terrain you're riding wrong. I can pretty much guarantee that your not bending your legs enough, or using them to absorb the shock on the trail. I use flats on my FR and AM bikes and have no trouble with my feet bouncing off the bike....unless I get bucked, but that's a whole different situation. People need to remember that your arms and legs are you first order of suspension, not your fork and shock.
    heck I run flats on my HT and even on the roughest sections my feet don't come off the pedals.

    I run flats on all my bikes (e.g. DH, XC, FR, etc..). Thanks to 5.10 sticky shoes, I don't feel I need to run clips and I don't think I'll ever go back to clips for dirt riding.

    I've tried a plethora of pedals and each had their pros and cons. recently I've purchased a few pair of Specialized Low Pro Mag pedals and I'm pretty happy with them. The only mods I did is get a few longer pins and replaced a few of them (ones on the edge of the pedal).

    keep it pinned...go FLAT out!

  37. #37

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    I've got Azonic A-Frames on my Blur 4X, which I use for all mountain. Not an issue with grip, much better than the V8's and V12's I had on my previous bikes. I dont even have any proper shoes, just some random cheap ass trainers. It's fine. Not slipped a pedal yet, just knocked my legs a few times whilst sitting and rocking the bike back and forth...my word those things are sharp...not the lightest, but they're damn nice to look at, and damn strong. That's what I'd get.

  38. #38
    Now with More Wood
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    DMR v12s here....pretty good value pedal (sealed bearings, replaceable pins, yadda yadda yadda) and I love their feel (I'm not so fond of the bigger pedals like the 5050s...). Apart from replacing a pin now and then they require little in terms of maintenance and I've yet to see them develop any issues as a result of the endless bashing they have to put up with...
    I run them with a pair of 661 Descend Taki's - works great, and yeah, shinguards (LizardSkin neoprenes with inserts for me) are nice too.........

    Of course, flats are cool because you are able to ride your bike with any shoes for those little runs into to town to pick up whatever it was that your SO forgot...although lately I seem to have developed a special talent for attempting to jump/clear/bunny-hop/whatever some interesting urban landscape feature on my way home with milk/sugar/toiletpaper/<insert favorite forgotten item here> and surprise surprise the seatpost is up, the powerlevel is down, the shinguards are comfortably tucked away in their locker and voila! there's another shin core sample extracted...

  39. #39
    I AM I AM
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    Another happy user of V12 Mags, only had Dice Outlaws prior which developed a noisy bearing in a short time.
    Platforms just give me heaps more confidence to try new stuff such as jumps / drops (small ones). Lol, I purchased knee protection due to falling with clipless pedals so much, got a pair of race face fr knee/shins after getting platforms but in reality I have hardly fallen / slipped off since switching over!

    Have put MSH BKS (Mosh Bikes) Half Step pedals on hubbys new bike (these are budget pedals, similar to the V12's in design but larger platform, don't seem quite as grippy).

    For the V12 mags I found a great price at www.speedgoat.com
    Very grippy, I use them with my Addidas Galaxy sneakers. Oh yeah pedals are pretty light but unless you go Ti Axle I don't think you'll find lighter than the Wellgos mentioned in the threads above. Azonic A Frames were on my shortlist too.

  40. #40
    Now with More Wood
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade
    Once you get use to A.M. riding in flats, all the little tricks you learn to compensate for the less efficient pedaling become automatic. I frequently outclimb less experienced riders riding bikes 10 pounds lighter than mine. And I rarely lose contact with these pedals:

    These scare the crap out of me. They make my V12s look like FisherPrice pedals.

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