Features to consider when buying a Helmet- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Features to consider when buying a Helmet

    What are the key features someone should look for when buying a helmet? Specifically i want to buy a XC helmet. What are the key features or differences between a $50 helmet & one that might cost $150? If i was particularly keen to provide my head with as much protection as possible is the $150 helmet worth the expense? Finally i am particularly interested in the Lazer Genesis XC helmet, any thoughts?

    appreciate any assistance cheers

  2. #2
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    for me venting was the main thing, i couldnt stand getting a hot head, so try to get something with as many BIG vents as possible,
    the new specialized helmets have an extra duct across the brow to help cool your forehead, which is really good, as thats where my 100 quid scott fuga is still a bit uncomfortable

    as much adjustability as possible is good, (head circumference on all helmets, and one some you can change where the head band part that goes around the back of your head joint to the helmet at the sides and top, to give you a perfec fit

    the more you spend the more crash protection they usually have, but a 40 helmet would be strong enough for mose people, unless you have a really high speed crash

    the laser looks good, but not that well vented compared to others,
    i'd have a look at this instead
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=30434

  3. #3
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    The single most important feature is fit. All else is secondary.

    The difference between a $50 helmet and a $150 helmet is generally:
    1. The $150 helmet will have bigger vents. Whether this makes it any cooler is pretty dubious.
    2. Available in flashier colours designed to appeal to bling riders
    3. If anything, the more expensive helmet may be *less* safe as more rigid internal structuring means less foam, which is the stuff that absorbs impact by deforming. They'll conform to the safe safety standards though.


    In a nutshell, don't spend too much on a helmet unless you want the pretty colours/racer look, have lots of disposable income, or simply need specialist protection like the Met Parachute or Casco Viper. Get a helmet that FITs.

    It's also worth mentioning that the different brands fit differently- try different brands on to figure out what suits your head.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    What are the key features someone should look for when buying a helmet? Specifically i want to buy a XC helmet. What are the key features or differences between a $50 helmet & one that might cost $150? If i was particularly keen to provide my head with as much protection as possible is the $150 helmet worth the expense? Finally i am particularly interested in the Lazer Genesis XC helmet, any thoughts?

    appreciate any assistance cheers
    For me the biggest difference from one helmet to another is how comfy the retention system and inner padding is, but that does not always mean more expensive is better. Helmets are something I will never again buy without trying on first. One thing I find helpful when trying them on is to bend forward and lift my head like I am on a bike, because one problem area for me is the back of some helmets (usually the retention system) digging into the back of my neck. When I tried one of the Roc-Loc systems, the knob in the back dug into my neck.

    I'm not aware of anyplace that rates bike helmets against each other for protection. If someone does know, please post the info, I'd like to look at it. I bought the Giro Xen because everyone talked about the "extra coverage" but when I got in I found it actually provides LESS coverage than any other helmet I've owned (all XC lids). VERY comfortable, however.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    the more you spend the more crash protection they usually have, but a 40 helmet would be strong enough for mose people, unless you have a really high speed crash
    I'm not sure I agree with that, unless you're referring to regular helmets (XC) vs. full faced helmets (DH). I think all helmets are designed to meet minimum standards whether it's a $30 helmet or a $130 helmet. A helmet company that would provide more protection only to those that can afford it seems sort of immoral. Right?

    Anyway I've mostly enjoyed Giro products, namely the Hex, and I recently bought a Fox Flux that I like too. The one thing with the Flux that I have a problem with is what I'll call "perspiration management." I'm not sure how much research goes into how sweat will be distributed underneath a helmet, but I've found that for some reason, all the sweat that comes from my head seems to flow directly down my nose and sometimes into my eyes. Other than that, I love the helmet. If you're looking for a good XC/AM helmet, I'd take a look at either of the above, or maybe a Giro Xen if you have a bit more coin.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    the more you spend the more crash protection they usually have, but a 40 helmet would be strong enough for mose people, unless you have a really high speed crash
    This is patently FALSE, assuming you are comparing one XC bike helmet to the next and not making the leap to a full face.

    All helmets sold meet the same safety standards. It is a pass/fail test, not a grading system, so any helmet that passes gets a certification sticker. We the consumer never know if one does better than the other.

    What makes up the difference in price is fit, venting, and weight.

    Cheaper helmets are "one size"; you start getting 3+ sizes (still with adjustments of course) at an intermediate price range. From there you get more vents, lighter construction, and "bling" only.

    I'll contend that spending enough to get a sized helmet that fits you well improves safety if your head is not one that fits well in a "one size" helmet by insuring the helmet stays put where it should be comfortably. After that it's just comfort and looking cool.

    I like Giro's Hex, Zen and similar helmets because they tend to sit lower over the back of my head thus covering more of it. No scientific proof they are safer because of that, but it's a mental thing for me.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek

    I like Giro's Hex, Zen and similar helmets because they tend to sit lower over the back of my head thus covering more of it.
    Iwould double check that about the Xen. It LOOKS like it should come down farther in the back, but in fact it actually just comes up higher on the sides. When I actually ran my finger around the edge of the helmet and against my head to feel how far it came down, it ends up being the least coverage of the 4 helmets I have owned, and as little as any I have tried on in a store

    YMMV.

  8. #8
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    "This is patently FALSE, assuming you are comparing one XC bike helmet to the next and not making the leap to a full face.

    All helmets sold meet the same safety standards. It is a pass/fail test, not a grading system, so any helmet that passes gets a certification sticker. We the consumer never know if one does better than the other"


    yes all helmets reach a certain safety standard, but that dosnt mean that some dont go beyond that, i really doubt that if a company could say they had made a stronger helmet than others, that they would change it so that it only meets the safety regulations

    have a look on the giro website, compare their mountain helmets, e.g. the 40 rift has their "in mold technology", whilst the 130 atmos has this, as well as their "roll cage", which they call an extra protection
    the companies selling more expensive helmets means they can use stronger/ extra material to strengthen the helmet more

    same with bell helmets, some (e.g the variant) include internal reinforcement, which their cheaper helmets dont all include

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]

    have a look on the giro website, compare their mountain helmets, e.g. the 40 rift has their "in mold technology", whilst the 130 atmos has this, as well as their "roll cage", which they call an extra protection
    the companies selling more expensive helmets means they can use stronger/ extra material to strengthen the helmet more

    same with bell helmets, some (e.g the variant) include internal reinforcement, which their cheaper helmets dont all include
    So, is there any evidence that these protect your head better? More reinforcement / stronger does not mean a better helmet. They don't protect your head unless they collapse.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    "This is patently FALSE, assuming you are comparing one XC bike helmet to the next and not making the leap to a full face.

    All helmets sold meet the same safety standards. It is a pass/fail test, not a grading system, so any helmet that passes gets a certification sticker. We the consumer never know if one does better than the other"


    yes all helmets reach a certain safety standard, but that dosnt mean that some dont go beyond that, i really doubt that if a company could say they had made a stronger helmet than others, that they would change it so that it only meets the safety regulations

    have a look on the giro website, compare their mountain helmets, e.g. the 40 rift has their "in mold technology", whilst the 130 atmos has this, as well as their "roll cage", which they call an extra protection
    the companies selling more expensive helmets means they can use stronger/ extra material to strengthen the helmet more

    same with bell helmets, some (e.g the variant) include internal reinforcement, which their cheaper helmets dont all include
    Basically, the "roll cage" is required for the helmets to pass the safety tests. It allows the helmet to use less material to be lighter and/or have more venting and still hold together on impact.

    The higher priced helmets also tend to have less actual head coverage--again a weight/venting deal--that while they pass the tests, they may leave areas of your head unprotected in real-world conditions.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by womble
    The single most important feature is fit. All else is secondary.

    The difference between a $50 helmet and a $150 helmet is generally:
    1. The $150 helmet will have bigger vents. Whether this makes it any cooler is pretty dubious.
    2. Available in flashier colours designed to appeal to bling riders
    3. If anything, the more expensive helmet may be *less* safe as more rigid internal structuring means less foam, which is the stuff that absorbs impact by deforming. They'll conform to the safe safety standards though.


    In a nutshell, don't spend too much on a helmet unless you want the pretty colours/racer look, have lots of disposable income, or simply need specialist protection like the Met Parachute or Casco Viper. Get a helmet that FITs.

    It's also worth mentioning that the different brands fit differently- try different brands on to figure out what suits your head.
    Agreed! Fit is everything. If the helmet does not fit your head well, closely, and securely (preferably without tightening the "head clamps") it can not protect you properly.

    I also check fit with the "head clamps" fully open and chin strap unbuckled. My favorite lid stays on when I bend over and touch my toes.

    THEN you check that the straps can be adjusted properly and be comfortable.

    Venting is iffy. Long hair blocks them and big holes let the sun shine directly on your head. I do just fine with "small" vents even on 100+ degree days.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    Iwould double check that about the Xen. It LOOKS like it should come down farther in the back, but in fact it actually just comes up higher on the sides. When I actually ran my finger around the edge of the helmet and against my head to feel how far it came down, it ends up being the least coverage of the 4 helmets I have owned, and as little as any I have tried on in a store

    YMMV.
    I'll stand corrected on the XEN as I don't own one. But the HEX definitely gives *ME* more coverage than most other standard XC helmets.

    Again, YMMV.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    yes all helmets reach a certain safety standard, but that dosnt mean that some dont go beyond that, i really doubt that if a company could say they had made a stronger helmet than others, that they would change it so that it only meets the safety regulations
    I never said that no helmet goes beyond safety standards. What I said is that we, as the consumer, do not know which do and in what ways.

    There is absolutely ZERO evidence that more $$$ = more protection.

    I'd love to see a more expensive helmet that had "more material". The expense comes from them having to design around using LESS material on the more expensive helmets. Really, go compare a $12 "big box store" helmet to a $200 race helmet; the $12 helmet has much much more material.

    You can read into Giro (or anyone else's) marketing hype all you want, but the data and the evidence aren't there (at least, aren't available to us).

  14. #14
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    food for thought, tks.

    has anyone experience with the Lazer Genesis XC?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    food for thought, tks.

    has anyone experience with the Lazer Genesis XC?
    Good helmet...if (IF) it fits you.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    I'll stand corrected on the XEN as I don't own one. But the HEX definitely gives *ME* more coverage than most other standard XC helmets.

    Again, YMMV.
    Actually, same mileage here. I had the Hex, and it does give better coverage than the Xen.

  17. #17
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    A friend of mine maintains that every helmet he ever buys has to have mesh over the vent holes. Apparently he got bitten by two wasps (on separate occations) who entered his helmet through the vent holes while he rode and proceeded to destroy him (he's bald).

    Limar is his current helmet; pretty cheap, his has the mesh, and comfy (for him and I)

  18. #18
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    i went with a cheap Giro and have had it for a couple years now. only thing i can think of is the little shade thing on the front

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ettore
    A friend of mine maintains that every helmet he ever buys has to have mesh over the vent holes. Apparently he got bitten by two wasps (on separate occations) who entered his helmet through the vent holes while he rode and proceeded to destroy him (he's bald).

    Limar is his current helmet; pretty cheap, his has the mesh, and comfy (for him and I)

    I haven't had problems with wasps, but other bugs do frequently enter the vent holes and have hitchhiked home with me in my hair. Putting mesh over them is a good idea.

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    wouldnt there be additional costs in developing different foams? foams that may have better qualities when used in helmets, foams that are lighter etc... as well as the development costs the construction may be more expensive? i guess i was hoping an insider might be able to comment? over time these construction tchniques/ foams would filter down to the "cheaper" helmets etc?

    i have tried on the genesis, there are no probs with the fit, certainly felt better on the head than the previous lid of several years though i didnt think there was anything wrong with that either.....

    Seems like the helmet industry could be a good industry to get into, if there are no real defining differrences between a cheap helmet & an expensive one...... a marketing strategy that was based on practical & justified explaination for the $150 price tag, a strategy that sought to remove the myth behind the expensive helmet. This would surely attract the attention of the discerning buyer.

  21. #21
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    Boreit......

    Try as many skid lids as you can. In my experience I find that the Specilized helmets to the best. Yes they are expensive, but you get what you pay for.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    wouldnt there be additional costs in developing different foams? foams that may have better qualities when used in helmets, foams that are lighter etc... as well as the development costs the construction may be more expensive? i guess i was hoping an insider might be able to comment? over time these construction tchniques/ foams would filter down to the "cheaper" helmets etc?

    i have tried on the genesis, there are no probs with the fit, certainly felt better on the head than the previous lid of several years though i didnt think there was anything wrong with that either.....

    Seems like the helmet industry could be a good industry to get into, if there are no real defining differrences between a cheap helmet & an expensive one...... a marketing strategy that was based on practical & justified explaination for the $150 price tag, a strategy that sought to remove the myth behind the expensive helmet. This would surely attract the attention of the discerning buyer.
    Wait, there ARE differences between cheap ones and expensive ones, several of us are just saying that effectiveness in a crash is not one of them. Yes, they can be lighter, better ventelated, more advanced retention systems, etc. It's just a matter if they are worth the extra $. For me, I've always been able to find a helmet under $60 I was very happy with, though I did pay $90 for the Xen I have now.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    Seems like the helmet industry could be a good industry to get into, if there are no real defining differrences between a cheap helmet & an expensive one.......

    There are plenty of REAL defining differences between expensive and cheap helmets, safety is just not one of them.

    With price increase you get:

    Much improved ventilation
    Decreased weight (a huge factor for some)
    Styling (face it, it matters)
    Fancy materials (ie: carbon right now)
    Fit (cheap helmets are "one size fits none")
    Overall comfort (which somehow seems to start mattering ALOT around hour 4.5!)
    etc.

    To MANY MANY cyclists, including me, these things MATTER. Most to varying degrees. I, for example, will gladly pay $50-90 for a helmet that fits, vents well, is light, and has some degree of "style" even though a $15 Wallyworld helmet would be just as safe. Others will spend more, others less, but there *ARE* reasons we are willing to pay more, and there's no doubt lots of R&D time and $ going into those reasons that starts with the $300 helmets and works it's way down eventually.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    wouldnt there be additional costs in developing different foams? foams that may have better qualities when used in helmets, foams that are lighter etc... as well as the development costs the construction may be more expensive? i guess i was hoping an insider might be able to comment? over time these construction tchniques/ foams would filter down to the "cheaper" helmets etc?
    I used to work for a company called Woodbridge Foam; they make foam for car seats and that impact foam inside cars (amongst other foams). When we want to make a different foam composition, we enter what we want into an excel file we made and it tells us what composition to make the foam with. Once we know the numbers (instantaneous calculation) we could change the code on the line (a minute maybe) and the next piece of foam that comes out (took 1 minute from pour to cure IIRC) would be made the way we wanted. If we wanted to, we could set it up to make like 200 different compositions in like 2 minutes (like, 200 different pieces of foam). R&D would be pretty low cost for us once we had the shape of the helmet.

    I am thinking most of the cost of a helmet comes from advertising and liability insurance (plus good old fashioned gouging).

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ettore
    I used to work for a company called Woodbridge Foam; they make foam for car seats and that impact foam inside cars (amongst other foams). When we want to make a different foam composition, we enter what we want into an excel file we made and it tells us what composition to make the foam with. Once we know the numbers (instantaneous calculation) we could change the code on the line (a minute maybe) and the next piece of foam that comes out (took 1 minute from pour to cure IIRC) would be made the way we wanted. If we wanted to, we could set it up to make like 200 different compositions in like 2 minutes (like, 200 different pieces of foam). R&D would be pretty low cost for us once we had the shape of the helmet.

    I am thinking most of the cost of a helmet comes from advertising and liability insurance (plus good old fashioned gouging).

    Like really?! Like totally?! Like don't you think there's some limits to just how far that excel file calculation goes?...

    I really hope so, and I really hope the real engineers at your company know what they are doing more than you do and have the good sense to check the foam for correct characteristics instead of just trusting some generalized computer calculation (and if excel is doing it, I can guarantee you it is grossly simplified and generalized). Otherwise I hope I'm not trusting my life to any of your foam...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    Like really?! Like totally?! Like don't you think there's some limits to just how far that excel file calculation goes?...

    I really hope so, and I really hope the real engineers at your company know what they are doing more than you do and have the good sense to check the foam for correct characteristics instead of just trusting some generalized computer calculation (and if excel is doing it, I can guarantee you it is grossly simplified and generalized). Otherwise I hope I'm not trusting my life to any of your foam...
    Well, if the different harnesses in the car foams he is referring to are still all the same basic technology, you probably could set up an exel formula to figure it out. The REAL question is knowing what harness to put where. In other words, WHAT you are plugging into the exel sheet is the really tricky part.

    I don't think that is the same thing as developing a different technology for a lighter foam with the same protective properties.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    Like really?! Like totally?! Like don't you think there's some limits to just how far that excel file calculation goes?...

    I really hope so, and I really hope the real engineers at your company know what they are doing more than you do and have the good sense to check the foam for correct characteristics instead of just trusting some generalized computer calculation (and if excel is doing it, I can guarantee you it is grossly simplified and generalized). Otherwise I hope I'm not trusting my life to any of your foam...
    Way to go with the random personal attacks, on the one poster who might be qualified to know *anything* about helmet material production

    My interpretation of his post was that for most foams, there is so much known about the production process that you don't need to do fresh R&D for every minor change. Do you seriously think that the stuff we have in our helmets is cutting edge materials science? Do you seriously have to resort to personal attacks to justify your purchases?

    Woodbridge has 8000 employees, I don't think they would have gotten that big in foam by clueless blundering.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    Like really?! Like totally?! Like don't you think there's some limits to just how far that excel file calculation goes?...

    I really hope so, and I really hope the real engineers at your company know what they are doing more than you do and have the good sense to check the foam for correct characteristics instead of just trusting some generalized computer calculation (and if excel is doing it, I can guarantee you it is grossly simplified and generalized). Otherwise I hope I'm not trusting my life to any of your foam...
    Being the entire planets leader in impact foam production, I would have to say their excel file is pretty good. It's not "my" company, I "used" to work for them. And yes, their calculation is amazing ... not exactly the most insane calculation for force absorption and deformation ... you learn these types of things in highschool if you can pass an advanced phsyics course.

    I never said they put it into their excel file, then change their production for real life foam on the fly. However, they can make 200 different pieces in like 3 minutes then beat the hell out of them in a few days and get all the "real life" numbers they want (coincidentally, they always match what the excel file says ... interesting how stuff like equations and science work.

    Make a helmet design, make 200 different copies (quickly), ultimately create the one that does what you want. People put a lot of faith in R&D ... for stupid disposable items (like an alarm clock, for example) ... what has more R&D ... it or a helmet? You are content paying $60 for a helmet but you'll shop around trying to pay $10 for something that actually took a brain to make.

  29. #29
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    Your head and eyes are the most important parts
    of your body. They are really what you need to protect
    the most. I don't care if a $20-$30 helmet will do as
    good of a job as a $100-$150 helmet will. I'm going
    to get the best money can buy, just to be on the safe
    side. I will not take chances with my head or eyes. A
    extra $100 isn't to much to spend for my head.

    Best, John

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl
    Your head and eyes are the most important parts
    of your body. They are really what you need to protect
    the most. I don't care if a $20-$30 helmet will do as
    good of a job as a $100-$150 helmet will. I'm going
    to get the best money can buy, just to be on the safe
    side. I will not take chances with my head or eyes. A
    extra $100 isn't to much to spend for my head.

    Best, John
    I've got a helmet that I want $400 for. You gonna buy it? Isn't your head worth that?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl
    Your head and eyes are the most important parts
    of your body. They are really what you need to protect
    the most. I don't care if a $20-$30 helmet will do as
    good of a job as a $100-$150 helmet will. I'm going
    to get the best money can buy, just to be on the safe
    side. I will not take chances with my head or eyes. A
    extra $100 isn't to much to spend for my head.

    Best, John
    It still has to fit properly. The most expensive helmets I have tried on have not fit my head. Many $40-80 helmets do.
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  32. #32
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    About the lazer helmet, I saw it online and casually found it at the lbs. I liked the fitting system thing in which you get to roll the thing in order to tighten it, but I didn't quite like the fit since I have medium-long hair most of the time.

    Personally, I love the Catlike Shield 2 and Whisper.

  33. #33
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    Hey kapusta, if you spent $400 on a helmet more power
    to ya. Yes my head is worth it, but I quess yours isn't. You
    only have a $20 head?
    Yes shiggy of course the helmet has to fit. Kapusta is
    probably selling his $400 helmet because his head is to
    fat for it.

    Best, John

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    turns out i apparently cant get the lazer genesis XC in australia.....the other helmets i like are the flux, met kaos & giro xen.... hopefully i can track a cpl down tomorrow to try on. tks

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl
    Hey kapusta, if you spent $400 on a helmet more power
    to ya. Yes my head is worth it, but I quess yours isn't. You
    only have a $20 head?
    Yes shiggy of course the helmet has to fit. Kapusta is
    probably selling his $400 helmet because his head is to
    fat for it.

    Best, John
    Actually, I use my head to figure out if there is any actual benefit to spending $150 on a helmet rather than $50. No evidence has ever been put forth to suggest there is. If there was, I would. However, if the higher price tag makes you think it is protecting you more, then truley a fool and his money are easily parted, and the helmet manufacturers appreciate you business.

    If you were REALLY concerned about your head, you'd be wearing a DH helmet, but I guess you just don't care.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    Actually, I use my head to figure out if there is any actual benefit to spending $150 on a helmet rather than $50. No evidence has ever been put forth to suggest there is. If there was, I would. However, if the higher price tag makes you think it is protecting you more, then truley a fool and his money are easily parted, and the helmet manufacturers appreciate you business.

    If you were REALLY concerned about your head, you'd be wearing a DH helmet, but I guess you just don't care.
    mate your starting to talk sht now, keep it constructive pls.

  37. #37
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    Boreit......

    Before you spend your money at your LBS, check out the Specilized Decibal helmet. It has way better ventilation then the ones you listed.

  38. #38
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreit
    mate your starting to talk sht now, keep it constructive pls.
    No, I'm talking sense now. it is silly to think that throwing more money at something is going to get you better results just because it costs more. It is especially silly when the helmet manufacturers themselves don't even make a claim that more expensive helmets give better protection.

  39. #39
    The Martian
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    Quote Originally Posted by womble
    Way to go with the random personal attacks, on the one poster who might be qualified to know *anything* about helmet material production

    My interpretation of his post was that for most foams, there is so much known about the production process that you don't need to do fresh R&D for every minor change. Do you seriously think that the stuff we have in our helmets is cutting edge materials science? Do you seriously have to resort to personal attacks to justify your purchases?

    Woodbridge has 8000 employees, I don't think they would have gotten that big in foam by clueless blundering.

    I could agree with that interpretation, and no I don't think the stuff is cutting edge materials (I also don't think it's cooler Styrofoam either).

    However, that's not what he said. He CLAIMED (or at least implied) he could easily, within one day, with no extra R&D, and with no tweeking to his calculation file, switch from minor variances in foam pieces the company typically made to making helmets. Sorry, I call total BS.

    Could a helmet company do it? I do not put it out of the realm of possibility at all.

    I know enough about engineering and tolerances to know that you just don't make that big of a jump. I did NOT know the name of the company and have no idea where you pulled it from (sorry I just don't dig into poster's histories or read and remember every post here to know details about their lives, and the company name was left out). I doubt very very seriously that the company operates on the "clueless blundering" that the poster implied they operate under...

    There was no "random personal attack" about it. His engineering is faulty (or at least his explanation of it), and yes, his writing style made it worse.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    I could agree with that interpretation, and no I don't think the stuff is cutting edge materials (I also don't think it's cooler Styrofoam either).

    However, that's not what he said. He CLAIMED (or at least implied) he could easily, within one day, with no extra R&D, and with no tweeking to his calculation file, switch from minor variances in foam pieces the company typically made to making helmets. Sorry, I call total BS.

    Could a helmet company do it? I do not put it out of the realm of possibility at all.

    I know enough about engineering and tolerances to know that you just don't make that big of a jump. I did NOT know the name of the company and have no idea where you pulled it from (sorry I just don't dig into poster's histories or read and remember every post here to know details about their lives, and the company name was left out). I doubt very very seriously that the company operates on the "clueless blundering" that the poster implied they operate under...

    There was no "random personal attack" about it. His engineering is faulty (or at least his explanation of it), and yes, his writing style made it worse.
    The name of the company was 'pulled' from the first line of his post. If you didn't pick it up it implies that you skipped over the post a bit quickly.

    Agreed that the his writing style and explaination isn't quite up to BBC English standards, but that's entirely normal for MTBR, where a vast chunk of posters seem incapbable if punctuation or capitalisaion

  41. #41
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by womble
    Agreed that the his writing style and explaination isn't quite up to BBC English standards, but that's entirely normal for MTBR, where a vast chunk of posters seem incapbable if punctuation or capitalisaion
    And speling

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