Fanny/ lumbar pack suggestions- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Fanny/ lumbar pack suggestions

    With this hot weather in Southern Cal, I can't stand wearing my camelbak with my jersey on. And when I don't wear the jersey I get a ridiculous tan from the straps.
    So I was thinking about getting some fanny/lumbar type pack, for water, pump, tools and tubes. (I don't want a seat bag, because I have Gravity Dropper post.)

    Any suggestion? Or is this just too dorky!!

  2. #2
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    Wal Mart. I think they are $6.99. Fanny pack that holds one water bottle and enough room in the zipper pouch for your wallet keys and iphone. I use it for the shorter rides from the house where I don't want to wear a camel pack. They have several different colors and they are in the camping section. Through away the water bottle that comes with it and get a good camel bak water bottle. My 2 cents.

  3. #3
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    Fundamental issues with ANY fanny pack is that it will work its way over your butt and down around your knees.

    The US Army figured this out with the Alice Pack -- which is a fanny with suspenders.

    CamelBak has all sorts of options for their packs. You should look at the military stuff designed for the desert.

    Sweat is a healthy part of riding. Get used to it?

    I have a seat wedge, and a Bontrager MTB pump that fits on the bottle rack screws on the seat tube (or down tube). I have a 1988 Nishiki Colorado which I fitted with a frame bag.



    That bag holds my "stuff" and is not in the way.

    Bell makes a bar bag . . . It's sort of large.

    Mostly, I think CamelBak makes a hydration system to meet your needs. Probably not a fanny pack out there that's going to work for you.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  4. #4
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    you could always try one of the waistpacks that runners use. something like this:
    http://www.rei.com/product/813736/ul...tion-waistpack

  5. #5
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    I ordered this model from Mountainsmith, today. If it doesn't work on the bike, I can always use it for long walks/hikes.

    http://www.mountainsmith.com/product...bCategory2Id=0

  6. #6
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    If it's that hot how would you carry enough water in a fanny pack? I carry at least 64 oz and up to 100 oz. I can't conceive hauling that much water and all my gear in a fanny type pack.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by allroy71 View Post
    I ordered this model from Mountainsmith, today. If it doesn't work on the bike, I can always use it for long walks/hikes.

    http://www.mountainsmith.com/product...bCategory2Id=0
    I did'nt see this before I commented, I think that pack with all your gear and 2 32oz water bottles is going to put the weight in a bad location and it seems bulky, I don't think you'll like it, but that's my opinion as I've never tried that set up.

  8. #8
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    I've read good reviews of the wingnut packs. They're more like a camelback that sits lower.
    Pugsley, Bullit

  9. #9
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    I have one of these when i'm road biking through the area... It can hold two water bottles if needed.

    http://www.thenorthface.com/webapp/w..._vc=CrossSells

  10. #10
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    2nd the Wingnut hydration pack.

  11. #11
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    Lowe Alpine Mesa Runner. I love the crap out of mine. Big enough to hold a pair of my shoes( size 9.5), a shirt, tools, road morph pump and some food. Plus a little bit of extra room.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  12. #12
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    Wonderful! thanks for the info that you guys have been discussing. Awesome!!!!

  13. #13
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    Bad Neck = No Camelback!

    I've got bad discs in my neck (c2, c3), which have forced me to deal with this issue for years.

    I had a Camelback fanny pack - but it only held 32 oz in a bladder. At least it was in a bladder and stored the water directly in the center of the pack. Water bottle holders located on the sides of the pack will only lead to you losing your empty bottles.

    Then I went to a Hydropak fanny pak. It had more room and a bigger bladder, (I think 40 oz). Trouble is when I loaded it with tools, food and water I had to sinch it down so tight it would restrict the blood flow over my hip to my thigh and eventually cause thigh cramps on long rides. It would also catch aoccasionaly on the seat as I tried to move my body on the bike.

    Lastly I went to an Ergon Pack ($$) because they are supposed to sit lower on your back. It helped a little, but it sat so low on my back it caught on the seat quite frequently when I was moving fore and aft on the bike.

    Now - I use a small Fox Seat pack for my basic tools & tube (and YES I have a Gravity Dropper Turbo seatpost). Just keep the velcro that goes around the post so that it has slack and the post will move up & down fine. I also use a 'road' jersey with the 3 pockets in the back where I put 2-3 Polar bottles.

    - So no clear cut answer here, just have to keep working on it till you find what works best for you.
    It's not how good you look......it's how well you ride !

  14. #14
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    try this

    ....'had the same problem w/ camelbacks w/ the NE summer heat/humidity so I did an extensive research on this recently. Zappos.com has videos for a better look. Pulled the trigger on the OSPREY talon 4. Feature-packed. Main pocket holds a spare tube, mini-pump and a baggie of various trail essentials and still has room for a handful of snacks. 2nd pocket for wallet & fon. The left front pocket for a mini-tool. The right front pocket for gel packs. Comes w/ (2) 20oz bottles but I use (2) 30oz for longrer rides paired w/ a "smartube" so i can drink on the go. The bottle holders are somewhat insulated/padded and you can pull them tight or loose on the go. The pack never got loose on the trail once tightened-up . Other pros: easier to see how much water i have, i fill the other bottle w/ gatorade,and I can grab what I need w/out taking the pack off. Most of all, less heat on my back! I also have a gravity dropper - no issues. 'hope that helps & good luck on your hunt..
    d butt u kicked today, could b d same butt you'll kiss tomorrow.....

  15. #15
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    Camelback is coming out with "minimalist" lumbar pack sometime this fall:

    Dirt Rag Magazine

    You might also try the Osprey Manta series. The Manta 20 is pretty small, and has a rigid suspension that sits most of the weight on your hips. Also great ventilation, although NOTHING is going to stop your back from sweating AFAIK.

    Here's a pic of my new Osprey Manta 30, fully loaded for a day hike:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fanny/ lumbar pack suggestions-img_0792-custom-.jpg  

    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  16. #16
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    I recently purchased a waistpack to avoid dragging a pack around for 1-2 hour afterwork rides:
    Amphipod RunLite AirStretch Trail Hydration Waistpack - 21 fl. oz. - Free Shipping at REI.com

    It holds a Lezyne Alloy pump, a spare tire, two Lara bars, a multitool, spare chain links, my phone, and a key. It probably would also fit a small pair of pliers. I really just wanted it as a place to hold my tools and pump for afterwork rides, where I don't need to bring water. Saddlebags didn't really fit the pump very well.

    I was skeptical of whether or not the water bottles would stay on the belt, especially after reading reviews of the bottles popping off. I decided to test them out yesterday. I ride AM/Trail pretty aggressively, plowing through rock gardens and drops. I planned on having to stop, turn around, and hike back up to pick up the water bottles, but to my surprise they stayed on the entire 3 hour, 20mi ride!

    The waistpack didn't slip at all. The waistband is a thick elastic, and it seemed to work great: comfortable but sturdy. It was also nice being able to just swing the waistpack around to the front without having to take it off to access the goods inside.

    With the water bottles staying put, I'm happy that I'll be able to take this on 3 hour rides also, where I actually do need to bring some water. For $17, I can also add two more water bottles. I like the small size of the water bottles, They reduce the amount of weight sloshing around when riding hard.
    Last edited by Lindahl; 09-03-2011 at 08:45 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lindahl View Post
    I recently purchased a waistpack to avoid dragging a pack around for 1-2 hour afterwork rides:
    Amphipod RunLite AirStretch Trail Hydration Waistpack - 21 fl. oz. - Free Shipping at REI.com

    It holds a Lezyne Alloy pump, a spare tire, two Lara bars, a multitool, spare chain links, my phone, and a key. It probably would also fit a small pair of pliers. I really just wanted it as a place to hold my tools and pump for afterwork rides, where I don't need to bring water. Saddlebags didn't really fit the pump very well.

    I was skeptical of whether or not the water bottles would stay on the belt, especially after reading reviews of the bottles popping off. I decided to test them out yesterday. I ride AM/Trail pretty aggressively, plowing through rock gardens and drops. I planned on having to stop, turn around, and hike back up to pick up the water bottles, but to my surprise they stayed on the entire 3 hour, 20mi ride!

    The waistpack didn't slip at all. The waistband is a thick elastic, and it seemed to work great: comfortable but sturdy. It was also nice being able to just swing the waistpack around to the front without having to take it off to access the goods inside.

    With the water bottles staying put, I'm happy that I'll be able to take this on 3 hour rides also, where I actually do need to bring some water. For $17, I can also add two more water bottles. I like the small size of the water bottles, They reduce the amount of weight sloshing around when riding hard.
    Interesting! I was at REI today and checked this out. It was very comfortable--the wide elastic belt felt just great. The storage compartment seemed a little small though. I too have a Lezyne alloy pump and it didn't seem like it would fit in this pack, but I'll take your word for it.

    I was tempted to try it out (REI's great return policy makes it pretty much risk free), but after checking out some of the other choices I decided to test this one:

    Osprey Talon 8

    It has quite a bit more storage space. Bottles are bigger than the Amphipod and have wide-mouth lids--which I like because I can easily put some ice cubes in the water. I'll see how it goes and if I don't like it I'll might try the Amphipod. You make a good point about the larger bottles being more like to slosh water around.

    You should write a review of the Amphipod on the REI site!
    Last edited by Porschefan; 09-03-2011 at 05:08 PM.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  18. #18
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    You could also go with a Revelate Tangle (https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...=1&ProductID=5) to get stuff off of your back.

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