Do shoes/pedals make much difference?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: _hamilton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    420

    Do shoes/pedals make much difference?

    I race sport level and do ok on slightly heavy equipment. I know my shoes are on the heavy side. Will getting some lighter shoes do much for rotating weight efforts?
    Any recomendations for shoes?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    It will make just about as much difference as taking weight off any other part of your bike e.g. the seatpost. Rotating weight is very overhyped, and about the only place it has any effect at all (and then not a very significant one) is on your tyres and rims.

  3. #3
    banned
    Reputation: nino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,770

    yes

    i ride all winter long and when it's cold just put on some neoprene covers that weigh about 400g. i can definitely feel the difference. if i'm slower or faster is another story but it can definitley be felt when spinning.

    i usually have Triple ti pedals and Sidi shoes so about the lightest possible combination. adding those booties is just like i would using some SPDs with Shimano shoes... it definitely feels heavy.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kenjihara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    355
    You do have to spin them around overandoverandoverandover, so you'd think that weight there would mean something...

    But if your stuff is comfy and fits good and feels efficient, it should be okay, shouldn't it? How heavy is heavy? I probably wouldn't realistically feel a difference from an SPD pedal to a slightly lighter pedal, but I might notice from an SPD DX clipless pedal set to a lightweight set.

    What is a heavy set of shoes? I'm still riding a set of Shimano M110s.

  5. #5
    banned
    Reputation: nino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,770
    Quote Originally Posted by kenjihara
    You do have to spin them around overandoverandoverandover, so you'd think that weight there would mean something...

    But if your stuff is comfy and fits good and feels efficient, it should be okay, shouldn't it? How heavy is heavy? I probably wouldn't realistically feel a difference from an SPD pedal to a slightly lighter pedal, but I might notice from an SPD DX clipless pedal set to a lightweight set.

    What is a heavy set of shoes? I'm still riding a set of Shimano M110s.
    shimano shoes are some of the heaviest shoes around.
    Sidi and Gaerne are light shoes, typically about 200-300g lighter than the Shimanos.

    check http://weightweenies.starbike.com/li...anufacturerout here:

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by kenjihara
    You do have to spin them around overandoverandoverandover, so you'd think that weight there would mean something...
    You might do if you weren't a scientist / engineer, and therefore didn't understand that in the absence of acceleration - ie you keep pedalling - the weight makes absolutely no difference.

  7. #7
    aka Jesse Palmer
    Reputation: jp3d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    857
    Quote Originally Posted by chris m
    You might do if you weren't a scientist / engineer, and therefore didn't understand that in the absence of acceleration - ie you keep pedalling - the weight makes absolutely no difference.
    Hmmm... but if you were a scientist you would realize that the constant circular motion is, in fact, a constantly accelerating motion. The speed may not be changing, however the direction and therefore the velocity is constantly changing, so the there is acceleration.





    It probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Makes no difference at all, as the acceleration is perpendicular to the direction of motion, and hence no work is done.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    796
    I think we can all agree that it's virtually no different compared to static weight. It is more important in MTB compared to road though since in MTB, your cadence varies a lot more.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    4,126
    Quote Originally Posted by chrism
    Makes no difference at all, as the acceleration is perpendicular to the direction of motion, and hence no work is done.
    Wow, you mean I'm not workin' when I'm spinning? Cool!

  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    346
    I'll stay out of the fracus and say that the Specialized Carbon Comps are a comfortable, good value and light shoe, about 150g lighter each than my old Shimanos. I time trial about 2% faster in them on the road, but your mileage may vary. To me, every second counts, and if I can shave off three minutes in a three hour race because of my shoes, then that seems like a good place to invest if you already have to replace your shoes anyway. I like egg beaters not only for their weight, but also for their mud clearing ability. It's one of the few places you can save weight without giving us something (other than adjustability I don't need).

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    682
    I'll second the Specialized Body Geometry Shoes(351grams Ea size 44) that were designed By Andy Pruitt from the Boulder Center for Sports Medience, and I use the Crank Brothers Candy 4 ti pedal @ 198 grams . The shoes have/designed with a cant built into the shoe that combined with the fit I had at BCM it has really made an impovement !

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCEqS...pShoesMountain


    http://www.specialized.com/bc/micros.../main.html?x=y

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.