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  1. #1
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    Cold weather gear?

    So here in Ohio weather is starting to get colder and I am wondering what type of clothing you guys are wearing? I new to biking and I don't want to stop riding just because it's cold out.

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    Commute + mt bike+ fat bike year round here in MA. Tights under mt bike shorts, legs pads, arm pads. Crashing on ice can be painful. Wool base layer, wool sweater, ploy pro wind proof vest as need. Wind pants if snowing or really cold. Poly pro hat under helmet that covers the ears. I run flat pedals and winter boot in the cold season. Warm, no issues.

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    After posting this I realized I hadn't mentioned my bike of travel. I ride mountain bikes for now.

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    Last winter was the first time I really did any cold weather riding. For me a wool jersey, windproof jacket and windproof gloves, ear covers, and tights were key. Also a light puffy jacket really helped when it gets really cold. Layers are the idea.

    Shoe booties when the temps are not too low...mid 40's+. Wool socks and block off any vents in the shoes. Below that I was wearing winter riding shoes, Lake MXZ303. They were good down into the low 30's for a few rides I did that were that cold.

    Otherwise...I'm generally good in shorts and a long sleeve shirt or short sleeve shirt with arm warmers down into the 50's. Sometimes I'll do knee warmers too if it's too warm for tights but too chilly for shorts.
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  5. #5
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    It's amazing how little clothing you need on your core in the winter. If you are riding, you will generate heat. Heavy clothing is quickly overcome by the heat your core can produce. To that extent, breathable breathable breathable. Hard shells like traditional ski and rain jackets are far from what you want. More than two layers is usually too much in all but the most extreme well-below-0F temps, although you also need an extra outer-layer available for things like long descents, in case of emergency, etc. Quick test is to think, can I go out and run in this and not get overwhelmed by sweat, moisture and heat? Effort wise, most winter riding is similar to XC skiing, which has similar breathability requirements. When you look at a picture of us (in Alaska) on a big group rides, you see almost everyone has the same model of Craft XC ski pants. It ends up looking like some kind of wild advertisement. But honestly, the XC ski pants, any variety, are usually pretty good. The best have wind-blocker fronts. Same thing with your winter jacket, wind-blocker front, soft shell, so you can breath. Until you get into the freezing temps, you generally don't need much clothing when riding in any kind of weather, maybe a light rain shell for riding in 40°F or some rain, but once you get into the freezing temps, all precip is going to be frozen. Riding all winter, mostly in the teens to twenties, but also warmer and colder, you aren't worried about liquid precip around here. Snow doesn't melt on your soft shell jacket because your most outer layer of fabric is always below freezing. Doing it right, you'll some times get "sweat beads" that form on it, which is from the vapor-form of sweat condensing and freezing on the outside of your fabric.

    If it's temps around 40 with rain, well, you are going to be miserable and you are going to get wet. A good packable rain-shell will be the most help IME.

    As far as wool on the core, not necessary. Good wicking synthetics are fine. Again, you don't want them too thick. I also find that the base-layers should be pretty close to your skin, as in fairly snug/tight, to move moisture away from your skin. I've noticed using looser base layers is not as warm. Most of us that have been skiing for years understand the thin base-layers, despite the popularity recently with underarmor and others. I usually get these at target, other places. Good polypro/synthetics from the outdoors brands like patagonia and others are great too, just more spendy.

    On the other hand, your extremities are where you have to beef up stuff considerably. SPD pedals and cleats are massive heat-sinks. If you go grasp your pedal if you store your bike indoors, you'll notice it's cold to the touch...in ROOM TEMPERATURE. Those things suck massive heat from your foot, and your foot doesn't flex like in running, so even before you consider those of us that don't have great circulation in our extremities in the cold, there are several factors working against you. There are solutions for SPDs that can work, but they are typically more complex/expensive than using flats and sorel-type boots with felt liners. Lots of "winter" SPD setups are so half-a$$ that it's simply not worth it to throw away a bunch of money. Luckily with fat-biking, a few manufacturers have significantly improved the options, but it's most definitely a pay-to-play effect if you want to run SPDs in truly cold temps.

    Same thing with hands, you gotta protect them. I use pogies below about 40 degrees and for sure below 30, but that doesn't mean my hands are always in them. As your body temp tends to vary considerably during a ride, I will roll them up at times and just go with my hands exposed, vs. other times when I have my hands in them. I need a lot more than just pogies, but they also allow you to run pretty thin gloves or glove-liners, which helps with your bicycle control tremendously. I've never found any truly insulated gloves that were good at mountain biking, your control decreases fast as far as being able to grip brake levers and controls and as soon as you sweat in them you are done. Pogies allow you to regulate this much better for cold temps.

    A decent balaclava is great for the head. We run something like this 95% of the time. A jacket with a hood helps too, but you can get the balaclava over your face, or pull it down and use it "hood style", on rides, this becomes another significant way to regulate your body temp, by adjusting how much of your face is exposed.

    Couple tips. Have an extra layer available (good puffy jacket is usually a good bet), but remember you want to start a little cold, because as soon as your start exerting, your body temp will skyrocket. Some of the solutions to things like cold hands and feet are expensive, but from experience, it might be a lot cheaper and less frustrating to go right to the end and buy that thing that makes it work for you. It's better to be over-prepared than under and when you have to incrementally buy a bunch of stuff that is better and better you realize you wasted money on the stuff that didn't work for you. Fatbiking is pretty serious in these Northern latitudes and places like Michigan, Minnesota, and these days most of the riding community has it pretty nailed down. Also remember to look to the XC ski community, they also have it pretty well nailed and share many of the speed/effort aspects of riding. If it's above 28 degrees, you can't get frostbite. You might loose all feeling and even possibly all function in digits, but this is important to know as far as what might constitute a critical situation. Your salty-body fluids freeze at about 28 degrees. Of course, I can't freaking grip things if my hands don't work, so chem heaters help out immensely in the winter time. Always good to have some of these as backups.
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    I wear my mtb bibs/shorts/jerseys year round, but add -

    Arm warmers, leg warmers, and thin wind vest - cheap and will get you through fall under what you're already wearing. - super functional/versatile kit pieces that every mtber should have.

    Freezing cold - thermal tights over bibs, under shorts. Thermal top under regular jersey or long sleeve jersey. (add on leg warmers/arm warmers/wind vest over this for additional warmth if needed). You also need to carry an additional jacket for when you stop - I like a super compressible, light density, down jacket myself.

    I wear my normal full finger gloves through fall, and have a winter glove for below freezing. Shoe covers or winter shoes. Wool socks. Waterproof socks can be handy too.

    Rain jacket (as breathable as you can afford) if it is wet out.

    Layers is key.

  7. #7
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    pretty much any ultrathin wool and ultrathin silk then layer accordingly

    -warmest and stink free stuff you can find
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    If I start out warmed up I don't need much to stay warm down into the teens. Break a light sweat before riding and with blood flow into the hands and feet established, I'm good. If I'm not warmed up and get chilled during the first part of the ride, there's no recovering.
    Do the math.

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    Thank you guys for all this info.

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    I ride year round. Not sure what I can add to the above. For me, my feet, hands and face are what I concern myself with. I always run pretty hot so core, arms and legs are never a problem, even to minus 35 Celsius. Like Jayem said, breathability is key. I always layer - good quality base layer, fleece and breathable shell. And never cotton. Never cotton. NEVER COTTON.

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    I hope Mikeshepard1975 won't mind if I ask you guys to elaborate on materials and sources. I was actually getting ready to make a post asking why wool is so damn expensive and what some alternatives might be. Early poster mentioned poly pro?? Is that a Polyester mix? Most of us don't have wool unless you live in Montana or are Amish so what are some good combos for those of us that can get to a Dick's or Target, or Farm and fleet (Midwest farm supply). Thanks


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    Don't mind at all, I encourage questions so we all can learn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShepard1975 View Post
    Don't mind at all, I encourage questions so we all can learn.
    I'm heading into REI this wknd. I'll let you know if I pick something up


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  14. #14
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    for wool I buy stuff from sierra trading post, still expensive but not absurd when prices are 50% down! good selection of smartwool and icebreaker!

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    Some of the Merino Wool is pricey for sure! I have searched out a few good deals over the past 2 winters but prior to that I never used wool. They are not all the same as far as blends and weights so look at the labels.

    I have to say it is an amazing fabric overall and just seems to out perform any other synthetic, hemp or bamboo material blends. Does not feel wet until its really soaked and with some airflow dries quickly. Merino Wool has air trapped in the fiber so it makes it a superior insulator. Just seems to be less smelly, I think mostly due to quick drying.

    I use the wool as soon as I need a base layer.

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    t shirt, fox shorts and something like these under them. i just get cheap ones at Walmart for like $20 for top and bottom


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    Thanks for the responses guys >mikeShepard1975. I swear I responded after going to REI but I guess it never posted. I found a smart wool top on clearance for like $68 from $80. Couldn't find and lowers on sale, had some matching $80 smart wool lowers in my hand but couldn't get past the fact I was spending $160 long undies, so I just bought the top. For now I'm goons wear the wool top with my underarmour cold gear lower leggings and see how warm I stay. After leaving REI I met wife at mall and stopped in the Columbia store. Again, no lowers on sale but did find sweet deal on a upper fleece pullover for like $30 at almost half off. Probably gonna ask for some of this crap for x mas


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    Not sure on the rules for posting eBay auction but these are on there for $39




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    Some great tips here. I'll just add a few thoughts as a year-round cyclist in CO.

    • Wool is indeed great. It is a bit pricier, but take care of it (wash in the washer, but let air dry), and it will last for years. The lack of stank is a huge adder for me.
    • Switch to flat pedals - then you can wear whatever warm footwear you have. I've ridden to work in 2' of snow wearing Baffin snow boots.
    • Don't worry much about your core - a good base layer and a shell to keep the wind off will do for most anything. Your core will warm up fast as you start moving.
    • You should feel a bit cold at the door/car. If you are warm and comfy standing next to your bike getting ready, then you'll overheat and sweat out once you are riding. Leave feeling a little cold.
    • For me, the tricky parts are hands and ears - if I can get them dialed, everything else is easy. I ride with "lobster claw" mitts that still let me work the brakes effectively. Pogies are great for even colder locations. For the helmet, I use an ear-covering thin liner (Pearl Izumi) down to about 30F. Below that I switch to my winter climbing/skiing helmet (Salomon MTN Lab) which has ear warmers. It isn't technically cycling rated, but it is rated for alpine climbing and downhill skiing, so I feel pretty good about it.
    • Just GET OUT THERE AND DO IT. In the winter, the hardest part about riding is walking out the door. I think about how badass everyone will think I am when they see my instagram photos, that helps get me out the door. Once I'm riding, all the fear about the winter sucking goes away - just gotta break through the initial hesitation.


    Good luck out there!

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    Quote Originally Posted by phidauex View Post
    Some great tips here. I'll just add a few thoughts as a year-round cyclist in CO.

    • Wool is indeed great. It is a bit pricier, but take care of it (wash in the washer, but let air dry), and it will last for years. The lack of stank is a huge adder for me.
    • Switch to flat pedals - then you can wear whatever warm footwear you have. I've ridden to work in 2' of snow wearing Baffin snow boots.
    • Don't worry much about your core - a good base layer and a shell to keep the wind off will do for most anything. Your core will warm up fast as you start moving.
    • You should feel a bit cold at the door/car. If you are warm and comfy standing next to your bike getting ready, then you'll overheat and sweat out once you are riding. Leave feeling a little cold.
    • For me, the tricky parts are hands and ears - if I can get them dialed, everything else is easy. I ride with "lobster claw" mitts that still let me work the brakes effectively. Pogies are great for even colder locations. For the helmet, I use an ear-covering thin liner (Pearl Izumi) down to about 30F. Below that I switch to my winter climbing/skiing helmet (Salomon MTN Lab) which has ear warmers. It isn't technically cycling rated, but it is rated for alpine climbing and downhill skiing, so I feel pretty good about it.
    • Just GET OUT THERE AND DO IT. In the winter, the hardest part about riding is walking out the door. I think about how badass everyone will think I am when they see my instagram photos, that helps get me out the door. Once I'm riding, all the fear about the winter sucking goes away - just gotta break through the initial hesitation.


    Good luck out there!
    Awesome post and inspiring. How much do those helmets run?


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    Yikes 2 hundo


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    Quote Originally Posted by injected59 View Post
    Awesome post and inspiring. How much do those helmets run?
    The Salomon MTN Lab was probably around $140 when I got it. Not cheap, but it is a great helmet for backcountry skiing and mountaineering, which I also do. Ski helmets of a more generic nature are frequently on sale, and can be quite inexpensive. Just get one that has enough breathability - a straight-up downhill helmet isn't really meant to exert in.

    Again, worth noting that they aren't technically rated for cycling, but for me the slower winter pace and having a helmet that works at all is worth the small potential decrease in protection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phidauex View Post
    The Salomon MTN Lab was probably around $140 when I got it. Not cheap, but it is a great helmet for backcountry skiing and mountaineering, which I also do. Ski helmets of a more generic nature are frequently on sale, and can be quite inexpensive. Just get one that has enough breathability - a straight-up downhill helmet isn't really meant to exert in.

    Again, worth noting that they aren't technically rated for cycling, but for me the slower winter pace and having a helmet that works at all is worth the small potential decrease in protection.
    Thanks! I'm gonna check into the lobsters too.


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    Wool. +1000 for wool.

    If you want wool but don't want to drop acres of cash for bike specific stuff, look here: https://www.varusteleka.com/en/categ...-and-jama/1557

    They make nice stuff and for the baselayer its hard to beat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    Wool. +1000 for wool.

    If you want wool but don't want to drop acres of cash for bike specific stuff, look here: https://www.varusteleka.com/en/categ...-and-jama/1557

    They make nice stuff and for the baselayer its hard to beat.
    Umm what's up with the Swedish commando underpants???


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    Quote Originally Posted by injected59 View Post
    Umm what's up with the Swedish commando underpants???
    I don't judge. :-)

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    Also, for the super budget minded. I'm on army surplus store right now and they have used polypropylene bottoms under cold weather for $9.99. They also have acrylic sweaters for like $30


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    Check out minus 33 for some cheaper merino wool options as well for base layers. I've heard good things but not actually tried them myself. I will the next time I need a new base layer. Just thought I would pass that info along.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRod0981 View Post
    Check out minus 33 for some cheaper merino wool options as well for base layers. I've heard good things but not actually tried them myself. I will the next time I need a new base layer. Just thought I would pass that info along.

    I have several pieces of their stuff. I also have some Ice Breaker and Smartwool as well. After wearing merino base layers for a number of years I'll never wear a synthetic base layer again. The tricky part is getting the right weight for the activity level. You don't want an expedition weight base layer for hi output activities, those are best for hunting situations where your standing or sitting for hours at a time. With a good base layer and a wind blocking outer you can do lots of winter activities in relative comfort, adjust your mid layer accordingly.
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    [QUOTE=CycleKrieg;13350700]Wool. +1000 for wool.

    If you want wool but don't want to drop acres of cash for bike specific stuff, look here: [url]https://www.varusteleka.com/en/category/sarma

    I think I'm on some type of watch list now.

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    [QUOTE=demonlarry;13422518]
    Quote Originally Posted by CycleKrieg View Post
    Wool. +1000 for wool.

    If you want wool but don't want to drop acres of cash for bike specific stuff, look here: [url]https://www.varusteleka.com/en/category/sarma

    I think I'm on some type of watch list now.
    I recvd my stuff from them and am pleased.


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    [QUOTE=injected59;13422536]
    Quote Originally Posted by demonlarry View Post

    I recvd my stuff from them and am pleased.


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    NICE! What did you get? I want to ride during colder weather without looking like I'm either racing in the Tour de France, or some sponsored motocross racer.

    Duluth Trading has slim fit stretch work pants that would, in theory, add a layer of protection, have good range of movement, and, hopefully not get caught up in a chain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeBurnsie View Post
    I have several pieces of their stuff. I also have some Ice Breaker and Smartwool as well. After wearing merino base layers for a number of years I'll never wear a synthetic base layer again. The tricky part is getting the right weight for the activity level. You don't want an expedition weight base layer for hi output activities, those are best for hunting situations where your standing or sitting for hours at a time. With a good base layer and a wind blocking outer you can do lots of winter activities in relative comfort, adjust your mid layer accordingly.
    This.

    And yeah, the biggest mistake a lot of people make is over-dressing and then sweating their asses off. You want to start off a little chilled, and wear layers that you can progressively shed or put back on, instead of a single bulky piece.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

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    Cold weather gear?

    [QUOTE=demonlarry;13422545]
    Quote Originally Posted by injected59 View Post

    NICE! What did you get? I want to ride during colder weather without looking like I'm either racing in the Tour de France, or some sponsored motocross racer.

    Duluth Trading has slim fit stretch work pants that would, in theory, add a layer of protection, have good range of movement, and, hopefully not get caught up in a chain.
    I got two different weight wool socks one pair was green and the other black that I layer. Wool base layer long johns. And a Lightweight wool beanie. I didn’t need a top as I previously purchased a smart wool top from REI that cost more than all the shit I got from these guys. Oh yah and I wear a fleece type pant I got at target for like $35 that are pretty slim fitting and don’t interfere with chain


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    Last winter was the first time I really did any cold weather riding. For me a wool jersey, windproof jacket and windproof gloves, ear covers, and tights were key. Also a light puffy jacket really helped when it gets really cold. Layers are the idea.

    Shoe booties when the temps are not too low...mid 40's+. Wool socks and block off any vents in the shoes. Below that I was wearing winter riding shoes, Lake MXZ303. They were good down into the low 30's for a few rides I did that were that cold.

    Otherwise...I'm generally good in shorts and a long sleeve shirt or short sleeve shirt with arm warmers down into the 50's. Sometimes I'll do knee warmers too if it's too warm for tights but too chilly for shorts.
    those are spring, summer and fall temps, not winter temps.

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    Injected59, I have a pair of those slim fitting sweat pants, they're pretty good,

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    I'll throw in for merino wool as well. I try to stock up in the summer and I have a pretty good array of options for cold weather various activities: hunting, snowboarding, & cycling. In CO, I haven't found that I ever need to wear baselayers on my legs when cycling, but I have found that a pair of neoprene knee sleeves are helpful when cycling on cold days. I have a retired (from the gym) pair of 5mm sleeves that I'll use that work great at keeping the knee tissues warm. They also add a bit of cushion when I crash (usually on ice).


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  38. #38
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    If you’re on budget


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    Quote Originally Posted by injected59 View Post

    If you’re on budget


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    There’s an Aldi near work, I’ll check it out, thanks!!


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    Sweet! I'll head to my local Aldi's to see if they have them. If they do everyone's getting socks for Christmas.
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    That's a pretty low merino content, that's why they are so cheap.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    That's a pretty low merino content, that's why they are so cheap.
    Yah, I really didn’t know how they perform but I figured their better than cotton as a backup. I really just wanted a new pair of socks to wear around the house. They’re a decent weight and they’re comfortable. Thinking of getting another couple pair for work throughout the week.


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    I'm in southern NH and we ride year round. Jayem and Phidauex cover things really well so I'm posting mainly to say re-read their posts. And I'll add a few ways to save money:

    Wool - it's great for warmth and minimizes the buildup of smells that you might get with other materials, but I use it only for socks. You want to look for a blend that has 70% wool if possible.

    Base layers - I've found that the cheap ones by 32-degree Heat are great. Usually 9.99 for a top or leggings and even less when on sale.

    Keeping your socks dry is important, so consider a taller boot or gaiters, depending on the pant you wear. Stepping in deep snow gets it all over your sock at the top of your shoe/boot, where it melts and wicks inside. A pant that covers the boot or gaiters prevents that.

    Pogies are great. Shop Amazon or ebay for some deals. Biking brands are pricey, but these also get used for snomobiles, 4-wheelers, etc.

    I haven't tried cross country ski pants, but have had great luck with Pearl Izumi thermal tights. They are like a thin version of neoprene but designed to bend in the right places.

    Balaclava is a great add. Plus I found a Giro winter helmet on clearance on Amazon and that was a nice addition since it has earmuffs and vents that can be closed.

    Fred

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by RagerXS View Post
    I'm in southern NH and we ride year round. Jayem and Phidauex cover things really well so I'm posting mainly to say re-read their posts. And I'll add a few ways to save money:

    Wool - it's great for warmth and minimizes the buildup of smells that you might get with other materials, but I use it only for socks. You want to look for a blend that has 70% wool if possible.

    Base layers - I've found that the cheap ones by 32-degree Heat are great. Usually 9.99 for a top or leggings and even less when on sale.

    Keeping your socks dry is important, so consider a taller boot or gaiters, depending on the pant you wear. Stepping in deep snow gets it all over your sock at the top of your shoe/boot, where it melts and wicks inside. A pant that covers the boot or gaiters prevents that.

    Pogies are great. Shop Amazon or ebay for some deals. Biking brands are pricey, but these also get used for snomobiles, 4-wheelers, etc.

    I haven't tried cross country ski pants, but have had great luck with Pearl Izumi thermal tights. They are like a thin version of neoprene but designed to bend in the right places.

    Balaclava is a great add. Plus I found a Giro winter helmet on clearance on Amazon and that was a nice addition since it has earmuffs and vents that can be closed.

    Fred
    Good info Fred! Thanks!!


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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by RagerXS View Post
    I'm in southern NH and we ride year round. Jayem and Phidauex cover things really well so I'm posting mainly to say re-read their posts. And I'll add a few ways to save money:

    Wool - it's great for warmth and minimizes the buildup of smells that you might get with other materials, but I use it only for socks. You want to look for a blend that has 70% wool if possible.

    Base layers - I've found that the cheap ones by 32-degree Heat are great. Usually 9.99 for a top or leggings and even less when on sale.

    Keeping your socks dry is important, so consider a taller boot or gaiters, depending on the pant you wear. Stepping in deep snow gets it all over your sock at the top of your shoe/boot, where it melts and wicks inside. A pant that covers the boot or gaiters prevents that.

    Pogies are great. Shop Amazon or ebay for some deals. Biking brands are pricey, but these also get used for snomobiles, 4-wheelers, etc.

    I haven't tried cross country ski pants, but have had great luck with Pearl Izumi thermal tights. They are like a thin version of neoprene but designed to bend in the right places.

    Balaclava is a great add. Plus I found a Giro winter helmet on clearance on Amazon and that was a nice addition since it has earmuffs and vents that can be closed.

    Fred
    Good info Fred! Thanks!!


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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by RagerXS View Post
    I'm in southern NH and we ride year round. Jayem and Phidauex cover things really well so I'm posting mainly to say re-read their posts. And I'll add a few ways to save money:

    Wool - it's great for warmth and minimizes the buildup of smells that you might get with other materials, but I use it only for socks. You want to look for a blend that has 70% wool if possible.

    Base layers - I've found that the cheap ones by 32-degree Heat are great. Usually 9.99 for a top or leggings and even less when on sale.

    Keeping your socks dry is important, so consider a taller boot or gaiters, depending on the pant you wear. Stepping in deep snow gets it all over your sock at the top of your shoe/boot, where it melts and wicks inside. A pant that covers the boot or gaiters prevents that.

    Pogies are great. Shop Amazon or ebay for some deals. Biking brands are pricey, but these also get used for snomobiles, 4-wheelers, etc.

    I haven't tried cross country ski pants, but have had great luck with Pearl Izumi thermal tights. They are like a thin version of neoprene but designed to bend in the right places.

    Balaclava is a great add. Plus I found a Giro winter helmet on clearance on Amazon and that was a nice addition since it has earmuffs and vents that can be closed.

    Fred
    Yup, those are all things that work well! The gaiters, if they are large ones, also offer a little more wind/cold protection, in addition to their usefulness for standing around in snow. 45N makes some "bike specific" ones, but I find that the Outdoor Research ones are even tougher (cordura grade). I find a variety of socks is also a good idea, give yourself options, plus I've found they wear to unacceptably thin levels after a few seasons, so they are fairly "consumable".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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    Great thread. I recently moved from CA to WI and looking for ways to extend my riding season. Lotsa of good info.

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    I bought a Smith Aspect snowboard helmet last year. Removable ear pads and you can open or close the top vents. I have acouple different skull caps i wear under the helmet.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumba View Post
    I bought a Smith Aspect snowboard helmet last year. Removable ear pads and you can open or close the top vents. I have acouple different skull caps i wear under the helmet.
    How much?$$


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    $50-100 based on size and color. My wife ordered a medium flat orange on Amazon for $50.00. I paid $64.00 for gloss blue last year.

  51. #51
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    Swix lobster claws off amazon for about $35. Worked good today in about 28 degrees. I feel below 20 with a headwind your fingers might get cold.




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    This is my first winter riding season in Wisconsin (riding a mid fat bike). I can ride down to about 15 with this ultra cheap setup:
    -2 cheap thin thermal layers from kohl's ($10ish each on sale)
    -summer cycling jersey to have pockets under outer layer
    -thin jacket, somewhat wind breaking. Cheap on closeout a few years ago
    -summer cycling bibs
    -spring arm and leg warmers
    -nylon wind breaker pants ($3 from goodwill) that really help with the wind on my legs!
    -snowboarding socks
    -bagel bags on my feet for stopping wind with very light layer
    -summer mtb SPD shoes (use them all year round)
    -thin cycling gloves made for spring weather
    -balaclava and skull cap under normal Giro helmet

    My hands are great if they don't get cold in the parking lot, but if they start cold it's hard to warm them again. I'm looking at a cheap pair if bar mitts like these https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B077SY7J6F/

    Toes get a little cold, just picked up a pair of over shoe covers to see if that helps get me below 15 degrees. I look homeless, and it takes 30 minutes to get dressed but it gets me out in the winter for cheap. Just get out there, upgrade what gets cold, and ride hard. It's so worth it on a calm snowy day!

    Oh, and a guy at RE I suggested to me last night to cut up a cheap thermal blanket and add to my shoes (those foil type blankets). It was $4, I'll be trying it next time the trails freeze up this week

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by phalkon30 View Post
    This is my first winter riding season in Wisconsin (riding a mid fat bike). I can ride down to about 15 with this ultra cheap setup:
    -2 cheap thin thermal layers from kohl's ($10ish each on sale)
    -summer cycling jersey to have pockets under outer layer
    -thin jacket, somewhat wind breaking. Cheap on closeout a few years ago
    -summer cycling bibs
    -spring arm and leg warmers
    -nylon wind breaker pants ($3 from goodwill) that really help with the wind on my legs!
    -snowboarding socks
    -bagel bags on my feet for stopping wind with very light layer
    -summer mtb SPD shoes (use them all year round)
    -thin cycling gloves made for spring weather
    -balaclava and skull cap under normal Giro helmet

    My hands are great if they don't get cold in the parking lot, but if they start cold it's hard to warm them again. I'm looking at a cheap pair if bar mitts like these https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B077SY7J6F/

    Toes get a little cold, just picked up a pair of over shoe covers to see if that helps get me below 15 degrees. I look homeless, and it takes 30 minutes to get dressed but it gets me out in the winter for cheap. Just get out there, upgrade what gets cold, and ride hard. It's so worth it on a calm snowy day!

    Oh, and a guy at RE I suggested to me last night to cut up a cheap thermal blanket and add to my shoes (those foil type blankets). It was $4, I'll be trying it next time the trails freeze up this week
    From experience, the core is pretty easy with lots of possible combinations that don't break the budget, like a base-layer+nylon running pants, up top active-wear long-sleeve shirts/base layers plus relatively inexpensive (find at the supermarket) soft-shell jackets or a combination of whatever as long as you aren't suffocating yourself. For the hands and feet, that's where it often gets pretty exotic, especially to maintain control and comfort at both ends. Good luck with the shoes, but there are inherent issues with summer SPD shoes that can't be solved IME. The easy fix is flats.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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