Cold front, clammy back

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  • 11-05-2014
    bank5
    Cold front, clammy back
    My typical ride consists of a lot of coasting downhill (on road and trail) and also a lot of punchy climbs on my single speed. My chest and stomach are often freezing on the downhills, while my back get clammy in part because of my camelback.
    What is the best gear to prevent being cold on downhills but not overheating on climbs?
  • 11-06-2014
    formica
    Cold front, clammy back
    There are cycle specific clothing items that are wind lock or wind resistant in the front, and wicking in the back. It helps also to dress in layers. I will usually put a shell on for descents so I don't get chilled, anyway.


    Sent from my iPad - Stupid autocorrect!
  • 11-06-2014
    127.0.0.1
    thin silk under thin wool

    nothing beats it's ability to stay warm, not clammy, and not stink
  • 11-06-2014
    leeboh
    Try some patagonia merino wool base layers.
  • 11-06-2014
    bank5
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by formica View Post
    There are cycle specific clothing items that are wind lock or wind resistant in the front, and wicking in the back.

    Any recommendations for cycling specific clothing?

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    thin silk under thin wool

    nothing beats it's ability to stay warm, not clammy, and not stink

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Try some patagonia merino wool base layers.

    How well does wool hold up on the trails and in the wash? Can I toss them in the dryer? Some wool shirts that I've looked at don't seem that durable.

    I absolutely love my wool socks when temps get below freezing. Wool is an amazing material, I'm just trying to figure out if it's worth the cost for something less durable than synthetic.
  • 11-06-2014
    leeboh
    No wool in the dryer, not clammy either. I love them for my bike commute.
  • 11-06-2014
    127.0.0.1
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    Any recommendations for cycling specific clothing?





    How well does wool hold up on the trails and in the wash? Can I toss them in the dryer? Some wool shirts that I've looked at don't seem that durable.

    I absolutely love my wool socks when temps get below freezing. Wool is an amazing material, I'm just trying to figure out if it's worth the cost for something less durable than synthetic.


    your outer layer or shell is what stands up to the trail. woll and silk will handle body flexing under a shell just fine. they do not survive many snags, but you can have holes in silk and wool and it will still do the job fine....

    wool
    hand wash or use delicate cycle in a front loader washer, same with silk
    hang dry on a little clothes rack with small fan underneath

    wool and silk don't build up any stink like synthetics will, at worse it might smell like grandmas mittens, but not smell like arse like synthetics with stink of doom. so little soap in a bucket, then quick rinse is pretty good for wool and silk. anything else i ride in goes in the wash machine

    llbean has nice superthin silk undershirts...they rock and for something so damn thin they work wonders at keeping heat in and clammy-b-gon
  • 11-06-2014
    perttime
    XC skiers have similar problems too, and gear designed for them is often warmer and more windproof in the front, and more breathable in the back.
  • 11-06-2014
    racerjerm
    Smartwool base layers with wind proof front mid layer is the way I go. They can be completely drenched and I will just hang dry and there will be no stink. I have washed them several 100 times also, hang dry, and they have held up no problem. Also the only socks I use, same performance...
  • 11-08-2014
    bank5
    I appreciate the replies.

    I tried on a smart-wool base layer at REI and it felt great. But it cost $105 and I didn't want to spend that much considering I probably won't wear that often. If I lived in a colder climate, I would have been willing to spend that much. I also toss everything I own in the dryer so I don't really want to bother spending extra care washing one piece of clothing.

    For now, I wound up changing my Camelbak Mule to a much smaller pack so my back will be better ventilated. I also picked up a C9 base layer. It was cheap (only $20) and I'll see how well it wicks sweat.
  • 11-08-2014
    racerjerm
    I wouldn't pay that much either. I watch Sierra trading, EMS, and a few others for deals on smartwool... I have always gotten the pieces I have for half of what REI sells them for. Oh and I ride until the temp is in the teens. But I also use them for duck hunting, work, etc...
  • 11-08-2014
    bank5
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by racerjerm View Post
    I wouldn't pay that much either. I watch Sierra trading, EMS, and a few others for deals on smartwool...

    Cool, thanks for the tip. I just saw these on Sierra Trading Post for cheap:

    Terramar Midweight Base Layer Top - Merino Wool, Zip Neck, Long Sleeve (For Men) - Save 60%

    Icebreaker Everyday Zip Neck Shirt - UPF 20+, Merino Wool, Lightweight, Long Sleeve (For Men) - Save 30%

    I'll probably go with the IceBreaker one since it has a tighter fit and gets 5 out of 5 on reviews and is a solid company.

    Now, I just need to find something else for $52 so I can get 30% off my $100 order :)


    EDIT: Well I decided to go with both wool tops (they were just $34 and $20 after discount), smartwool socks, base layer pants, board shorts, a long sleeve top and two performance tees. Total including tax and shipping was $154
  • 11-08-2014
    racerjerm
    If you sign up for their email, they will send you random 30% off coupons that will work on top of their other sales. That is when you can get the really good deals...
  • 11-23-2014
    WA-CO
    I wash and wear the hell outta my smartwool stuff. It's a touch pricey, but it lasts a remarkably long time. If you find it on sale, get it. No hesitation.
  • 11-23-2014
    J.B. Weld
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WA-CO View Post
    I wash and wear the hell outta my smartwool stuff. It's a touch pricey, but it lasts a remarkably long time. If you find it on sale, get it. No hesitation.

    x2

    Good wool is worth every penny paid. I've had an Ibex wool base layer top for about 10 years and just throw it in the washing machine with everything else, I bet I've washed that thing 500 times.
  • 11-23-2014
    evasive
    Cold front, clammy back
    Icebreaker and Ibex Ts are much nicer than Smartwool's, IMO. I have one of all 3, and I almost never wear the Smartwool. You can find them on sale without too much trouble. I wouldn't pay $100 either, but $50 is worth it for something that gets that much use and works so well. Despite being lighter and feeling more delicate than synthetics, they aren't. Mine have held up for ~5 years of riding, backpacking, floating, skiing, etc.

    This time of year, I ride with a light wool T under a softshell. If it's less than 40, I might do with a long sleeve T. When it's less than 20, I wear a mid-weight wool zip-neck, but I don't ride in those temps much, because then I'm usually skiing. I unzip the jacket for climbs and zip it up for the descents. It works perfectly for me. As others alluded to, it's the same clothing I use for XC skiing.
  • 11-24-2014
    fsrxc
    Decent base layer helps with the clammyness, but like was said, bike/XC-ski jackets often have windproof fronts and breathable backs.

    Another option is a vest, you can get some with windproof front and mesh back, perfect when you don't need a full jacket, here's an example:
    Mavic Espoir Vest 2015 > Apparel > Jackets and Vests | Jenson USA
  • 11-24-2014
    bloodyknee
    +1 on the vest, especially when mountain biking. I like vests better than jackets because they allow for quicker and easier range of motion.