Armoring/rerouting Spec hoses/cables- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    Armoring/rerouting Spec hoses/cables

    Anyone else find Spec's routing of shift cables and brake hoses odd on some models where they run under the BB? We've noticed this on several models over the years at the shop. Other than the occasional chop on a shift cable from a rock, I'm surprised it hasn't been more of a problem. We have lots of rocks in our riding area and places that I like to go to like Moab. I just got an '08 SJ FSR, and the brake hose concerned me more than anything else. Fixing a boogered shift housing back at camp is a hassle but not the end of the world...though the crappy shifting for the rest of the ride is quite an annoyance. A cut brake hose, however, would really screw up my riding style for the remainder of a ride and fixing it back at camp requires new hose, bleed kit, and some time. I have some Goodridge stainless lines on a Nomad and Bullit, but a decent rock strike is still going to booger the hose in many instances with a BB hose routing.

    This is probably a bigger concern than a frequent real world occurence, but it still makes me nervous. I wish the brake hose in particular was routed up top somewhere. It looks like there is some potential for doing this with some homestyle ziptie doodling and other such engineering. For the moment, I thought I'd just "armor" the cables and hose to see how that works. I used some decently stout, fabric braided fuel line for the brake hose. I found some hard plastic liner to cover the two shift cables. I used zipties to secure the covers on all 3 applications.

    Anyone else tried creative, successful solutions to this issue?...just don't worry about it?...have any horror stories of failures due to rock or other hits to the cables/hoses? Please realize that I'm not bashing the bike as such. It's a great bike. The cable/hose routing down there just seems odd.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    1:18
    Reputation: Corvette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    518
    Enduro S-Works 2006, cables are routed a bit better, at least the important brake one. Few times I've busted the f. der. cable and that is all - only one failue, solved with duck tape. But the newer models tend to have more exposed routing.

    On the Enduro SL the brake cable can be put between the frame and left BB cup and then running on the chainstay. That way it is lifted and not under the downtube.

    I agree about the odd routing though. It's one of the few cons on my Enduro 2006 (the DHX Air is home tuned, rubber decreased volume). However, IMHO you don't have to be much concerned. Rocks and gravel are our frequent "fellow travellers" on hard Alpine terrain and as said, I've only had one or two shifting problems.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    401
    I totally agree about a weird routing. I am thinking it would be a very rare event that would probably wreck a crank or at least some rings in the process. Nice ideawith the armor.. My only worry when I saw it is that water might enter your tubes and degrade the cable housings over time. Not sure if they would be affected by that or not.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,379
    You are worrying to much. For the brake hose to be cut by a rock you would have to have this happen. The rock would have to be extremly sharp and smaller that the width of the frame, the rear suspension would have to be fully compressed, there by placing the brake hose very close to the BB and the frame, the rock would have to put more than 5000 psi of pressure unto the cable and frame to cut that hose, So your frame would be damaged at the same time as the brake hose. But since chain rings get in the way first of most rocks, it would be a very rare event. Now, you might get brake hose abrasion, but even that is rare.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    665
    I tried to figure out a way to use a brake noodle or Avig Rolla-Ma-Jig for the under-bb loop that goes to the front der. One of these days I'll actually try it.

  6. #6
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    I agree...

    Quote Originally Posted by PB Matrix
    You are worrying to much. For the brake hose to be cut by a rock you would have to have this happen. The rock would have to be extremly sharp and smaller that the width of the frame, the rear suspension would have to be fully compressed, there by placing the brake hose very close to the BB and the frame, the rock would have to put more than 5000 psi of pressure unto the cable and frame to cut that hose, So your frame would be damaged at the same time as the brake hose. But since chain rings get in the way first of most rocks, it would be a very rare event. Now, you might get brake hose abrasion, but even that is rare.
    Yeah, I see it as relatively unlikely. The rocks in our gnarliest riding place are big, sharp, and loose for the most part. Newcomers are always shocked during the faster downhills how many rocks are being kicked up by their front wheel and striking their bike, feet, or shins. I actually wear some AXO brand DH shoes at this place for the slightly higher uppers. This place is primarily a dirt motor ranch with 88 miles of trail...hence the loose rocks. It's still a real hoot on a good full suspension bike, but most people we invite don't come back for mountainbiking. I don't even get this kind of loose rock action at Moab. That's the only reason for my concern. Here's a sample pic of some of the routine trail there.

    One thing on my homemade armoring setup that I just realized...it might double as a decent frame guard at that spot.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    365
    I would think that based on the posts above and my experience with my own Stumpy, if you manage to wreck those cables you've got some far more serious things to worry about as well.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.