Anyone wear goggles with their non full-face helmets?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anyone wear goggles with their non full-face helmets?

    I see it occasionally and I would like to try it out. Most glasses end up slipping down my nose or just being a general pain to deal with during the humid weather we have down here.

    Any suggestions/pictures?

  2. #2
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    I'd think that it would be hot unless you are doing more downhill that climbing. You should expect to have more sweat and a way to manage it. I'd try to find a cheap pair of googles to try out. You could cut out the foam filters around the top and bottom of the goggles to let more air in and out. You may also have fogging issues, so plan on treating the lens with something to prevent fogging.

    ben

  3. #3
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    If nose slippage is your reason, rather than the normal dust and mud reasons downhillers use goggles, than I would try and find sunglasses with a really grippy rubber nose piece instead, maybe retainers that don't interfere with helmet straps? If it's hot and humid, goggles will make that worse on your face, and potentially fog.

  4. #4
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    I love wearing goggles, but I ride in the arid west, and most of my rides are climbing for a descent. I only put them on for downhills. I hate even having sunglasses on my face while I'm sweating up a long climb, so I'm just substituting goggles for sunglasses on downhills. When they're not on my face I wear them strapped to my helmet with the lenses to the rear; headband underneath my visor.. I wouldn't wear them on a Moab trip, for example, since the trails there generally don't offer extended downhills. I'm not sure I'd want to wear them in a humid environment.

    Take a look at the Ryders Eyewear Face, Caliber, or Thorn lines. They are full coverage glasses, and the Face GX are specifically intended to be a goggle alternative.

    FWIW, I have the Ryders Shore goggles with a mirrored lens, and they're great. They vent much better than the Smith MX goggles I used to have, and their antifog abilities are as good as claimed.
    Last edited by evasive; 04-16-2015 at 04:30 PM. Reason: autocorrect correction

  5. #5
    meow meow
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    oakley ubotanium really does work. pricey but awesome. just make sure it is on the nose and arm pieces.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies! Evasive, I'll take a look at some of your suggestions.

  7. #7
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    I will second the Ryders Shore goggles. I use them when I'm winter night riding with a Bell Super helmet. I got sick of my glasses constantly fogging up. They were totally useless most of the time. I tried goggles this year and they worked perfectly. The Ryders are built to be used for mountain biking so they fit with a normal helmet better and they vent better.

  8. #8
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    For anyone who does wear goggles: the Shore comes with a clear lens, and you can order replacements in a variety of tints and features. I wanted the photochromic lens since the reviews on NSMB.com's forum were so good (worth reading) but since I also replaced my helmet, shoes, pack, shorts, and gloves this spring I chose the $30 blue mirror over the $90 photochromic. Turns out the 30% VLT of the blue mirror is perfect. It's light enough for evening runs through shady forests, but dark enough for sunny afternoons. I'll use the clear lens for night rides in the fall.

    The construction is solid and feels like quality. It's much more substantial than my Smiths (which only cost $25 after all). But for as often as I wear them, it's worth the added cost. They don't fog, and they vent well.

    Here's what it looks like:

  9. #9
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    Goggles are trail condition and weather dependent. I'll also wear them on dry days on sandy, silty, loose rock trails to protect my eyes from dust, and rock and wood anti-mtb ground missiles from the rider in front of me. The helmet is also condition dependent, so I'll use what is appropriate as needed. I try to remember my mouth piece for every trail ride. I only bring this up because there is a graphic on my mouth piece of two eyeballs.
    Goodbye '95 ZJ. Just so you know, transfering box of left behind womens panties to next truck. Thank you ZJ!

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