Anti fog/hydrophobic and photochromic/polarized lenses?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anti fog/hydrophobic and photochromic/polarized lenses?

    Where I ride mountain it's shaded and sunny so pure black are too dark for the shade and clear is too light for the sunny. I'm not sure how well photochromic lenses work but I think it's a good concept. It's damn sunny where I rode bike so something totally black would be nice for that. I've seen glasses that come with several lenses. Any recommendations?

    Smith Pivlock V2 is on sale at Pricepoint for more than half off right now but some reviews say they run small and I'm a bigger guy so I don't know if that will work and polarized would be nice for road biking. Do I need to get two separate pairs, one for each purpose?

  2. #2
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    I use prescription transitions lenses in Oakley sports sunglasses. Works really well - just looks a bit strange if you are off the bike when it gets too dark and you are suddenly wearing sunglasses with clear lenses.

  3. #3
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    Polarized & photochromatic lenses won't get light enough for shady riding. You want standard photochromatic lenses.

    Polarized lenses by definition block ~50% of the incoming light. And most are ~20% transmission (50% from polarization, plus a secondary neutral attenuator).

    If you looks at the Rudy Project Polarized/Photochromatic lenses, they range from 10-30% VLT (visible light transmission). That range is best suited for water/snow where you need polarized lenses for glare, and its fairly bright. 30% VLT is a little on the dark side for riding in shady areas.

    Polarized lenses aren't needed for road biking, since you don't typically get much road glare, and you're not usually following cars. If you got a standard photochromatic lens, they will typically span you can get a range from 15% (dark sunglasses) to 70% nearly clear. The Pivlock V2 claims 14%-78%, so you can always use them.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
    Polarized & photochromatic lenses won't get light enough for shady riding. You want standard photochromatic lenses.

    Polarized lenses by definition block ~50% of the incoming light. And most are ~20% transmission (50% from polarization, plus a secondary neutral attenuator).

    If you looks at the Rudy Project Polarized/Photochromatic lenses, they range from 10-30% VLT (visible light transmission). That range is best suited for water/snow where you need polarized lenses for glare, and its fairly bright. 30% VLT is a little on the dark side for riding in shady areas.

    Polarized lenses aren't needed for road biking, since you don't typically get much road glare, and you're not usually following cars. If you got a standard photochromatic lens, they will typically span you can get a range from 15% (dark sunglasses) to 70% nearly clear. The Pivlock V2 claims 14%-78%, so you can always use them.
    Now I'm looking at the Smith Parallel D Max. It comes with polarized lenses that I'd use for road riding and two other less dark options I could use for MTB. It's really bright around here so I want it DARK for road biking.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Now I'm looking at the Smith Parallel D Max. It comes with polarized lenses that I'd use for road riding and two other less dark options I could use for MTB. It's really bright around here so I want it DARK for road biking.
    That's what I do. I've got a pair of Oakley Split Jackets with Violet Iridium (14%) and a Light Grey (40%). The 14% lenses are what I use on sunny morning road rides, and the 40% is for shady conditions.

    In general, I rarely ride longer than 4 hrs, so I can reliably pick lenses to match conditions. Spare lenses are easily carried in a bag or pocket if needed.

  6. #6
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    I've got a pair of bolle tempest, they work really well for me, and i believe they go from 20-80% tint

  7. #7
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    Endura - Products just got these.

  8. #8
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    On the topic of Endura, I went shopping yesterday as well.

    Endura Guppy Glasses

    Can't wait for them to get here.
    Long is the way, and hard.

  9. #9
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    I've been very happy with a couple of pairs of Julbo glasses I've owned. Their photochromic lenses are the zebra and zebra light. I've got the zebra lenses and the only time I've wished they were lighter was when it was already past sunset and cloudy. Even then they were still wearable. I've never noticed that I wanted them darker. Planning on picking up some of their goggles with zebra lenses soon.

  10. #10
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    I have a pair of Oakley Jawbones with the Transitions lens. They get light enough to where I can use them at night. They don't get dark enough (compared to their black Iridium lens) on a really bright day.

  11. #11
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    Careful with polarized lenses riding.

    Polarized cuts glare. So, wet log strip might look dry. Or an icy patch on a rock might not stand out. Both of those can be hazardous to you.

    I run Rudy Rydons with clear photochromic lenses for mtb and some road. They go 18-78 % VLT

    The only time I have found these to not work is when it's actually dark and you are using lights. Then, I switch to clear (92% vlt) lenses.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristianCoté View Post
    On the topic of Endura, I went shopping yesterday as well.

    Endura Guppy Glasses

    Can't wait for them to get here.
    Those look cool, but there was no mention of VLT
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  13. #13
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    I returned the V2 since I did not like the fit and also realized I preffered framed lenses. Sweat doesn't get as easily on the lens with upper frame stopping it. V2 are frameless.
    I have also found out the best way to pick glasses: try them with the helmet on.
    Some AM helmets sit lower on the sides and can interfere with the glasses. I had this problem with some Oakleys.
    My favorites now are Oakley Radarlock XL Straight. They don't stick out on the sides too much and are taller = great visibility, the upper part of the frame doesn't obstruct the vision at all.

    Regarding lenses. I have tried different tints, yellow, persimmon can really help to sharpen the objects.
    But lately I have been using oakley transition during day rides and clear lenses on late afternoons and night rides.
    The transition is fast enough for me, but I did not compare them to other brands. It is not ultra fast though.
    They still get foggy and I believe they used some film on them to help with this, but in time it gets less effective. When I start moving they get clear fast.
    I have stopped using polarized lenses.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    Those look cool, but there was no mention of VLT
    Hoom. Yeah, I can't find the documentation that came with them so I'm not real help to you there. I had an old set of Endura Stingrays a lot like these before and that's what influenced me to get these more than hard numbers. I figured based on the more serious construction and the hydrophobic/anti-fog features these would probably just be an overall upgrade to those, and I've found that to be the case (unless you were a person who reeeeaaaally liked the light smoke lenses that Endura no longer makes for their glasses). As far as I can tell, the VLT is very similar, if not the same, but Endura has never bothered giving out those numbers.
    Long is the way, and hard.

  15. #15
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    ~3 years later and still digging the Smith glasses I got. The lenses are a bit scratched up and the frame has some bubbling in the coating but otherwise they're great.

    Anyone know if you can get photochromic lenses for these?

  16. #16
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    For cycling and golf I use an amber tint lense. They are designed to provide high contrast in low light conditions, whilst still blocking 100% UV etc. You can transition between light and dark with no issues.
    I thing brown, orange, yellow lenses are much the same.
    They actually make things look brighter, but without the glare, and still protecting your eyes.
    On overcast grey days they actually make your world look cheerier than it is.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    For cycling and golf I use an amber tint lense. They are designed to provide high contrast in low light conditions, whilst still blocking 100% UV etc. You can transition between light and dark with no issues.
    I thing brown, orange, yellow lenses are much the same.
    They actually make things look brighter, but without the glare, and still protecting your eyes.
    On overcast grey days they actually make your world look cheerier than it is.
    I use the amber ones for mountain biking but some of my trails have really tree covered dark sections then sections with no cover that are really bright. It’s not a big issue but if I could fix it with transition lenses for $50 I would.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    ~3 years later and still digging the Smith glasses I got. The lenses are a bit scratched up and the frame has some bubbling in the coating but otherwise they're great.

    Anyone know if you can get photochromic lenses for these?
    often you can buy just the lenses on ebay. Pro tip: the parallel max and regular parallel are interchangeable.

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