Absolute best moisture wicking tops?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Absolute best moisture wicking tops?

    I sweat a lot, like ridiculous amounts. and i like to commute via bike, only problem is that when i arrive wherever im going, even if its a quick 10 minute ride, im drenched, and sweat even more once i stop riding. it sucks.
    if I try riding in a cotton shirt, especially if its a hot day, and put out any kind of effort i show up looking like i just stepped out of a lake, as in, completely drenched.

    So i'm looking for the best moisture wicking material tops out there. I've got a Giro merino wool jersey that i like for rides, but its a tad too thick and a tad too good at keeping me warm when im sweating. nice for all day rides with breaks and varying temps. but not as good for quick fast commutes on a hot day. it does wick moisture pretty damn well though.

    So any suggestions? how about a tight fitting thin base layer and a baggy top over it? and i am looking for something somewhat "normal t shirt" looking. if im wearing it for day to day/work stuff i dont want to wear the super bright flashy racey stuff.

  2. #2
    Ride More - Suffer Less
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    I find that the material with a larger weave allows more air flow which seems to help moisture dissipation. Some of the tighter weave hi-tech fabrics that some of the boutique clothing companies use just don't seem to dry fast enough due to the tight weave and lack of airflow.

    No cotton for sure, lots air flow.

    Oh yes, a Sweat Buster to keep the drips off your forehead as well a must...

  3. #3
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    A change of clothes is the only way for a bike-commuting sweathog. I think most would want to shower after a drenching and before working with others, but maybe you work in a gym.

    No fabric can effectively manage the quantity of liquid we sweathogs put out.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    A change of clothes is the only way
    ^^^ Please and Thank You.

    -
    -
    -

    On topic, I haven't found much improvement, if any, in the more expensive stuff vs. the cheap wicking material found in bargain stores. I have a buddy who swears by his Capo base layer shirt though.

  5. #5
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    If im biking to work or something important, well ill either just drive, or leave with plenty of time and take it slow. im more talking about biking across town for normal day to day stuff, like going out for lunch, dinner, grabbing grocerys, running errands, etc. where i just dont want to show up drenched.

    I understand that a material can only do so much, its not gonna stop me from sweating, so while moisture wicking is important, its just as important for it not to be as noticeable. so far my Giro merino shirt is the best for that, being a dark color and sweat never seems to sit and soak. like it does with other materials.

    Im thinking of trying a super think base layer like this..
    Merino Base Layer - Sleeveless Cycling Undershirt by Giro

    or
    Base Mesh - Foundation - Apparel - Men's - Cycling

    and a loose fitting, super thin moisture wicking material for a shirt. just not sure what that would be..

  6. #6
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    I've been experimenting with wool. I bought a light icebreaker t-shirt. It wicks well, dries really fast, and there's no odor. I don't wear it all day after a ride or anything, but I don't feel rude walking into a store on the way home, either.

    I think it's one of the Tech T Llites
    Anthem Advanced
    ECR

  7. #7
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    I like the Patagonia wool base layers, they make 3-4 different thicknesses.

  8. #8
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    My fav fair weather shirts are Stoic Breathe 90, I have several both in long and short sleeves. I almost always wear the long sleeves esp when it's bright out whether riding or hiking. They are impossibly thin so they wick and cool much better imo and so far don't retain the funk like cheaper dri-fit clones. They do snag a bit easy but otherwise seem durable, haven't needed to test the lifetime warranty. I also have the IceBreaker T Lite and while great they seem thicker than a thick cotton shirt so I haven't tried riding in them.

    The Breathe 90 are on sale on BC.

  9. #9
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    Icebreaker Tech T in black is the answer.

    I also have black polos by Icebreaker and Smartwool but they are a bit thicker. They are OK for work, as long as I kinda take it easy and don't get drenched. Even if I do, though - they still don't show (black) and don't stink. We do have showers at work, too - but I find I don't need to use them every tie.

    Synthetics like Stoic Breathe are an absolute no-go for me - they develop a bad stench. I do wear some synth Maloja jerseys over my body armour sometimes for DH, but then change in the car

  10. #10
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    I got an LG carbon road jersey that is phenomenal for breathe-ability. Its basically like not wearing anything. I can't wear it for riding under 80F, I'll freeze. It was pretty expensive (~$50 on sale), but its far far better than the cheaper jerseys I have.

    The cheaper wicking layers are usually heavier weave and don't breathe as well as more expensive fabrics. Its the same materials, but its the weave that determines the weight and breathe-ability. Expect to spend about ~$20 for a decent wicking T-shirt, the cheaper ones aren't as good. I've got good Northface and UA shirts.

    If you're a heavy sweater, commuting in work clothes isn't realistic. The stuff that keeps you cool isn't suitable for work and vice versa.

    Your best plan:
    1) Commute in something light-weight and breathable. Figure spending about $20.


    2) Immediately on getting to work, drink a large glass of COLD water. You need to get your body temp down to stop sweating. Wait 5 min.


    3) Change into a wicking baselayer as an under-shirt, to continue cooling and prevent stink.

    4) Wear work shirt over the base layer.

    I can't stress step 2 enough. Getting your core temperature down is the best way to stop sweating.

  11. #11
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    I agree that you probably should change clothing, but if you are looking for a regular sportshirt that you can wear in a casual office that breaths extremely well look at this
    Stays Cool Textured Short-Sleeve Sportshirt
    I have biked in it to work and it breaths incredibly well for a cotton short and dries very quickly.

  12. #12
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    I too sweat like a sonofa b. I don't think you are going to find much difference in anything clothing-wise, apart from the obvious - like no devil's cloth. Ever. That's cotton btw. And white or light colours only. I also wear a Halo headband for everything I do strenuous. Those things are the shit, and they look killer, especially under a helmet.

    When I exercise at lunch at work, I need about 15 minutes of cool down before I even go near the shower. And I never go near coffee before or after strenuous activity. Coffee makes things 5x worse. I suppose that's obvious. That said, I am a big believer in caffeine so I do drink coffee before mountain biking but I don't really care how sweaty I get when I am in the mountains hammering away.

    For what it's worth, tonight I wore a white Oakley synthetic short sleeved white shirt I just bought in Whistler this past weekend. It was 32 degrees Celsius here tonight and I biked on a single black singletrack with a sustained climb for 2 hours and didn't sweat very much. I think the shirt helped in that regard.

  13. #13
    meh
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    Would stay away from wool, it doesn't dry near as fast as synthetics, especially for a heavy sweater (I am also). Wool wont pick up odors, but as long as you use a tech wash with the synthetics that shouldn't be much of an issue. There is no magic bullet shirt I have found yet, but as mentioned, open weaves are better for what you are looking for.

  14. #14
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    Merino tees are comfortable, amazingly funk-resistant, and I don't buy synthetics any more, but I agree that I wouldn't rate wool that high for wicking.

  15. #15
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    I have a couple Swobo merino tees that are pretty nice for riding and dry out very quickly without retaining odor. If you go with synthetic probably plan on changing into a dry shirt after you cool down as nothing soaks up the funk better than synthetics in my experience.

  16. #16
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spec44 View Post
    I've been experimenting with wool. I bought a light icebreaker t-shirt. It wicks well, dries really fast, and there's no odor. I don't wear it all day after a ride or anything, but I don't feel rude walking into a store on the way home, either.

    I think it's one of the Tech T Llites
    silk or wool are the only things that wick and don't reek to holy hell

  17. #17
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    I always were a tight base layer when riding. In the summer the really thin ones like the Garneau carbon mesh base layer are fantastic.

    MESH CARBON SLEEVELESS CYCLING BASE LAYER :: Louis Garneau

    I also really like the "showerpill". I wipe down with these after a ride and they are very effective. However you do need to stop sweating at some point. The ice cold water trick definitely helps in this regard.

    https://showerpill.com/


    I like Merino but other than socks, tend to avoid in the warm weather months. There are some super thin summer synthetic jerseys and the POC Trail Light t-shirt is also quite nice.

  18. #18
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  19. #19
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    I have several sleeveless Pearl Izumi and Castelli road jerseys that wick well for me. Once it gets really hot that's what I typically wear. I tend to prefer MTB specific jerseys in the winter and fall but I haven't found any wick and cool as well as road jerseys in the summer. Maybe because they are to loose fitting. Also, you probably already know this but, make sure you never wash any of your riding gear with fabric softener. That really reduces the wicking ability of the fabric.

  20. #20
    What? There's more?
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    I also sweat in absurd amounts. I think we are just more highly evolved... yea, that's it. The only shirt I ride in anymore is UA Heatgear longsleeve. They are super thin and move moisture better than anything else I've tried. It's like wearing a swamp cooler.

  21. #21
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    Idk what the best is...Most are 100% polyester , the tighter weave the less it breathes.

    Check these out "Bimini Bay Outfitters Short Sleeve Cabo Crew" T shirt. I wear them saltwater fishing down here in muggy FL , they work.

    Bimini Bay Outfitters Cabo Crew Short Sleeve Shirt at Amazon Men’s Clothing store:

    Walmart is also carrying various "starter core tee's.. cheap , like $7 each ,that's what I've been riding in.

  22. #22
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    Ride in this...lots of ventilation...

    Super snowflake = when an avatar offends you so much you have to cry about it and report it to admin. Life must suck for you.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    Ride in this...lots of ventilation...

    that's a axl rose edition wife beater..

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsa101 View Post
    If im biking to work or something important, well ill either just drive, or leave with plenty of time and take it slow. im more talking about biking across town for normal day to day stuff, like going out for lunch, dinner, grabbing grocerys, running errands, etc. where i just dont want to show up drenched.

    I understand that a material can only do so much, its not gonna stop me from sweating, so while moisture wicking is important, its just as important for it not to be as noticeable. so far my Giro merino shirt is the best for that, being a dark color and sweat never seems to sit and soak. like it does with other materials.

    Im thinking of trying a super think base layer like this..
    Merino Base Layer - Sleeveless Cycling Undershirt by Giro

    or
    Base Mesh - Foundation - Apparel - Men's - Cycling

    and a loose fitting, super thin moisture wicking material for a shirt. just not sure what that would be..
    Stick with the merino and find some dark base layers (thin) like the Ibex at Jensons or Icebreaker. No, they don't dry as quick as dri-fit/clima dri/made up marketing name implying quick drying and funk free material but I can wear them multiple days in on my commutes to work and they are great.

    I am all about the merino now. No more synthetics and the funk.

    Oh yeah, get a Sweatbuster for your helmet too. Keeps your melon cool and your eyes free of sweat.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar-man View Post
    ...Oh yeah, get a Sweatbuster for your helmet too. Keeps your melon cool and your eyes free of sweat.
    Thanks. I just ordered one.

  26. #26
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    and bugs and bees outa your hair, I can't imagine riding w/out the sweatbuster anymore.

  27. #27
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    We make some great Fishing Shirts...dont see any reason why they wont work in Mountain Biking...as they are moisture wicking, Performance shirts and we have an inhouse designer so we do custom as well...long sleeve or short sleeve...check em out....

    Ive been away from biking too long...need to get back in now!
    Custom Performance Apparel for the Trails
    Surfmonkey Gear

  28. #28
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    I recently got the patagonia long haul shirt Patagonia Men's Long Haul Western Shirt

    shirt still gets drenched like anything else, but the nice thing is that it seems to dry quicker than anything ive tried, being a button up, its nice to be able to unbutton and keep riding, helps it dry out even quicker. plus having a colar is nice, keeps the neck cooler and gives some extra sun protection. think im sold on button ups like this, still want to try some other options.

  29. #29
    What? There's more?
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    I like that style of shirt to ride in for all the reasons you stated. Cheapo Hawaiian shirts do well also but have the same problem: short sleeves. The sun is too intense here (NM). Anything super-light, long sleeve and not cotton?

  30. #30
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    I'm surprised any of the UK members haven't commented about Rab's MeCo line - the MeCo 120 tee shirt is very light, wicks brilliantly, and importantly doesn't ever stink. The downside - the price, but end of year stock is heavily discounted online.

  31. #31
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    I have decided recently that I really prefer the cut and fabric of Nike or under armour workout shirts over any cycling jersey I have.

  32. #32
    ∞~∞~∞~∞~∞
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    I wear these when I ride and they are absolutely fantastic!!!!!

    Insanely affordable, lightweight and durable.plus they have a UV protection of 50

    They are not see through so no worries there either.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    .
    Rick~
    16' Superfly 9.6
    Tucson, Az.

  33. #33
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    $4 Cool-Dri short and long sleeve shirts. For $4, I don't care if I shred the shirt on its first ride. There are 12 colors to choose from!
    Goodbye '95 ZJ. Just so you know, transfering box of left behind womens panties to next truck. Thank you ZJ!

  34. #34
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    The only sport shirt I wear these days is the Mountain hardwear wicked lite. It's less than 200g and it feels like you're not wearing a shirt at all. Best shirt I've ever bought for max comfort in the heat or lounging around.

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