What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?- Mtbr.com

Poll: Thread: What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?

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  1. #1
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    What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?

    My friends and I were talking and we were wondering if All Mountain riders ride more with flats or clipless pedals. The discussion came about with me wanting to try flats after many years using clipless.

    Thanks for answering the poll

  2. #2
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    Search tool is your friend. Endless threads on this topic

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  3. #3
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    Been clipless since my bmx racing days, never looked back.

  4. #4
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    I use both so I can't vote.
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  5. #5
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    Clipless for 15yrs or so. About a decade on flats now. No desire to ever go back.
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  6. #6
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    Flats for me.

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I use both so I can't vote.
    Yes, me too and I am sure there are bunch of us that ride both, one of my bikes has the Doubleshot 3.

  9. #9
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    +1 for both, but anything sketchy or new it's flats

  10. #10
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    I can't answer out of fear of being mocked for using the wrong ones.

  11. #11
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    Started with clips, then flats (kept falling over), and now trying clipped again. When the new bike comes, I'll reassess as I hope to have a fairer opinion on whats best for me.

  12. #12
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    Flats though I admit I have never tried clipless. I don't feel the need to try to fix what's not broken.

  13. #13
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    Always have been clipless.

  14. #14
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    Flats on MTB, clips on road bike

  15. #15
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  16. #16
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    Flat for road and mtb. Everything easy.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Flat for road and mtb. Everything easy.
    I have not used flats since 1966 for the road. Toe clips back then and now clipless. Road use of flats prevents me from push pulling thus reducing my watts available to move me along fast. Also, in high torque situations like on a long grueling climb, push pulling helps keep the torque on the bike more equal improving balance and power. So I do not understand going flat on the road?????????

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaxMustang50 View Post
    Flats though I admit I have never tried clipless. I don't feel the need to try to fix what's not broken.
    Of course use what you like but you may be missing the benefits of clipless if you never tried it. It has it places, even in mtb.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    So I do not understand going flat on the road?????????
    That is odd, but anyways this thread is about the All Mountain application of flats vs clipless.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    That is odd, but anyways this thread is about the All Mountain application of flats vs clipless.
    You are correct, the thread was about mtb but a poster mentioned flats on the road. So I commented but I guess I should have just moved on. Thanks and Travel Safe!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Of course use what you like but you may be missing the benefits of clipless if you never tried it. It has it places, even in mtb.
    I get my opinion is shortsighted but I tend towards contentment with most things.
    I suppose I'll give them a try sometime just because. Now to find a friend with my shoe size who rides clipless...

  22. #22
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    Clipless on my gravel bike, flats on my mountain bike.
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  23. #23
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    clipless on my left, flat on the right...
    but sometimes I switch it up and go flat-left/clipless-right
    Deflated - buy parts to sell parts to buy more parts.. bikes are my drug of choice

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  24. #24
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    You can always try both...at the same time

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    I have not used flats since 1966 for the road. Toe clips back then and now clipless. Road use of flats prevents me from push pulling thus reducing my watts available to move me along fast. Also, in high torque situations like on a long grueling climb, push pulling helps keep the torque on the bike more equal improving balance and power. So I do not understand going flat on the road?????????
    It can be hard to understand. When I rode road I zoned out enough to forget to follow a turn. Went off the paved path and into a stream for a crash. Mtb keeps me engaged completely.

  26. #26
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    Run both...

    Hard tail tends to be flats & FS usually clips.

    Although mood can alter preference.



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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Road use of flats prevents me from push pulling thus reducing my watts available to move me along fast. Also, in high torque situations like on a long grueling climb, push pulling helps keep the torque on the bike more equal improving balance and power. So I do not understand going flat on the road?????????
    I used clipless for all road riding for about 20 years. Then about three years ago I started riding a lot with flats mostly due to being too lazy to change the pedals (I would run flats on the bike for riding around town) To be honest, I did not find it made all that much difference, except during brief all-out efforts.

    I think people often overestimate how often they are actually “pulling” on the pedals. Many times what we perceive as pulling is really just lifting our leg enough to unweight the pedal.

    GCN (who are serious Roadies) did some tests with clipless and flats for road bike use. The results really surprised them, in that while clipless did help in certain scenarios, overall it was less of an advantage than they had assumed.

    It was enough of an advantage that it is a no-brainer for racing, but otherwise, just ride whatever you feel most comfortable in.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Yes, me too and I am sure there are bunch of us that ride both, one of my bikes has the Doubleshot 3.
    I have been looking at the Double Shot 3. How do you like them?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToYZiLLa View Post
    I have been looking at the Double Shot 3. How do you like them?
    Bought them on line for 81 USD brand new. Crank Brother recently improved their higher end stuff with dumping the needle bearings and using lube impregnated sleave. Also improved the dirt seals and redesigned end cap. The 3s are the only Doubleshot with eight adjustable pins. Lesser models get molded bumps. In snow and ice, I use the flats all the time. We will see how I use them in the warmer months. They work great. Recommended.

  30. #30
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    Flats

  31. #31
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    I have never seriously used clipless. I've never been a roadie either though. When I tried to use clipless I found that it was distracting worrying about unclipping on an unplanned dismount. Couldn't really get used to it so I wouldn't ride the bike with clipless as much and just rode the one with flats. Sometimes is hard to teach an old dog new tricks. I ride for fun and whatever health effects that has so flats it will always be.

  32. #32
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    If you train on releasing it would become near automatic. That said, I have crashed at low speed clipped in while try to scoot up a short hill. Issue was frozen leaves under a small amount of snow. Real wheel spun and I lost forward momentum. So I tipped over clipped in. That saved the bike from any damage and I had a sore shoulder for a couple of days. I often ride crushed limestone 34 miles each way to get to one of Lake Michigan’s best beach. Without clipless, I could not maintain a fast enough to make the round trip and enjoy the beach. To each their own but clipless does rules when conditions are good. It connects me to the bike and I become a part of the machine.

  33. #33
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    Yes.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    If you train on releasing it would become near automatic. That said, I have crashed at low speed clipped in while try to scoot up a short hill. Issue was frozen leaves under a small amount of snow. Real wheel spun and I lost forward momentum. So I tipped over clipped in. That saved the bike from any damage and I had a sore shoulder for a couple of days. I often ride crushed limestone 34 miles each way to get to one of Lake Michigan’s best beach. Without clipless, I could not maintain a fast enough to make the round trip and enjoy the beach. To each their own but clipless does rules when conditions are good. It connects me to the bike and I become a part of the machine.
    This is very true... I road clips for about 5yrs before switching. Now that I have, I can never see myself going back to clipless.

    One of the first and most major things that I noticed when I switched over to flats was the fact that I had developed some very bad habits simply because of the clips. This was things like pulling my feet up while jumping, bunny hopping, etc., relying more on the clip to keep my feet planted in bad lines than actually maneuvering my body, etc. Now, having that freedom to dump a foot whenever you feel like it without having to have the muscle memory to unclip (yes there is always a split second or two where you have to think about unclipping regardless of how good you are) can save you in certain cases.

    For me, case in point was July 2016 going around a fast, loose corner during a big group ride. My rear tire broke loose and started to slide, when it did I attempted to unclip that side (right side, sliding around a right side turn) only to not have enough time to unclip and moto-plant my foot. What ended up happening was I was 3/4 of the way through the unclipping process when my pedal and heel were low enough to the group to catch a rut at the edge of the trail. Resulting crash had me off the bike until the next season due to a tibial fracture and blowing out that ankle. One surgery later and I still have the hardware in my ankle to keep it stabilized properly.

    This all literally happened within a couple seconds, the guy riding behind me watched the entire thing unfold, and when I had stopped rolling down the side of the little hill he asked me "What the hell was that? That was the oddest crash I have ever seen." I didn't know I had broken anything until I attempted to walk up the hill (thus putting pressure on the tibia asking it to stabilize me while I walked) and well that was that.

    While this is an extreme example of what can go wrong, it was literally down to the couple split seconds that it took me to unclip vs. just dropping my foot off the pedal. Funniest part was I had just the night before purchased a pair of flat shoes online to "try" because I wanted to improve some of my skills like manualling, bunny hops, etc. That got to wait a good 9 months before I could start working on that.

    Funny thing is that I feel more secure in riding flats now, I have improved and PR'd items that I had a hell of a time doing with the clips just the year prior. So there are always benefits and drawbacks of each type.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    If you train on releasing it would become near automatic. That said, I have crashed at low speed clipped in while try to scoot up a short hill. Issue was frozen leaves under a small amount of snow. Real wheel spun and I lost forward momentum. So I tipped over clipped in. That saved the bike from any damage and I had a sore shoulder for a couple of days. I often ride crushed limestone 34 miles each way to get to one of Lake Michigan’s best beach. Without clipless, I could not maintain a fast enough to make the round trip and enjoy the beach. To each their own but clipless does rules when conditions are good. It connects me to the bike and I become a part of the machine.
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    This is very true... I road clips for about 5yrs before switching. Now that I have, I can never see myself going back to clipless.

    One of the first and most major things that I noticed when I switched over to flats was the fact that I had developed some very bad habits simply because of the clips. This was things like pulling my feet up while jumping, bunny hopping, etc., relying more on the clip to keep my feet planted in bad lines than actually maneuvering my body, etc. Now, having that freedom to dump a foot whenever you feel like it without having to have the muscle memory to unclip (yes there is always a split second or two where you have to think about unclipping regardless of how good you are) can save you in certain cases.

    For me, case in point was July 2016 going around a fast, loose corner during a big group ride. My rear tire broke loose and started to slide, when it did I attempted to unclip that side (right side, sliding around a right side turn) only to not have enough time to unclip and moto-plant my foot. What ended up happening was I was 3/4 of the way through the unclipping process when my pedal and heel were low enough to the group to catch a rut at the edge of the trail. Resulting crash had me off the bike until the next season due to a tibial fracture and blowing out that ankle. One surgery later and I still have the hardware in my ankle to keep it stabilized properly.

    This all literally happened within a couple seconds, the guy riding behind me watched the entire thing unfold, and when I had stopped rolling down the side of the little hill he asked me "What the hell was that? That was the oddest crash I have ever seen." I didn't know I had broken anything until I attempted to walk up the hill (thus putting pressure on the tibia asking it to stabilize me while I walked) and well that was that.

    While this is an extreme example of what can go wrong, it was literally down to the couple split seconds that it took me to unclip vs. just dropping my foot off the pedal. Funniest part was I had just the night before purchased a pair of flat shoes online to "try" because I wanted to improve some of my skills like manualling, bunny hops, etc. That got to wait a good 9 months before I could start working on that.

    Funny thing is that I feel more secure in riding flats now, I have improved and PR'd items that I had a hell of a time doing with the clips just the year prior. So there are always benefits and drawbacks of each type.
    The other day I tried clipped again and bested my uphill time in the first section of the ride by two minutes. Climbing through chunky stuff, again was feeling awesome with the amount of power to the rear wheel. But I was there to repeatedly bomb down through the rough stuff to work on fork settings, but as soon as I hit a (mild) turn in the rough loose stuff, I panicked and didn't feel comfortable clipped in. Once my foot was out, couldn't find the correct location to re-clip in.

    As mentioned in the first quoted post, I know I need to practice practice practice. But as stated in the second post, I can't get the potential bad crash out of my head (which I think is where most of my problem lies).

    Good thread.

  36. #36
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimF777 View Post
    The other day I tried clipped again and bested my uphill time in the first section of the ride by two minutes. Climbing through chunky stuff, again was feeling awesome with the amount of power to the rear wheel. But I was there to repeatedly bomb down through the rough stuff to work on fork settings, but as soon as I hit a (mild) turn in the rough loose stuff, I panicked and didn't feel comfortable clipped in. Once my foot was out, couldn't find the correct location to re-clip in.

    As mentioned in the first quoted post, I know I need to practice practice practice. But as stated in the second post, I can't get the potential bad crash out of my head (which I think is where most of my problem lies).

    Good thread.
    yeah it really comes down to your confidence and understanding of the potential risks of outcome. At almost 40yrs old (will be in Sept) the body just doesn't heal like it used too nor is quite as pliable. So crashes are a much more concerted effort of risk vs. reward. Once you get yourself into a bad crash that causes injury enough to mean time off the bike, well that will always stick in your head. Since my crash I am VERY aware of the terrain I am riding and now HATE loose crap like that. The likelihood of a similar crash with similar results happening is pretty slim but that is not a risk I am willing to take anymore.

  38. #38
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    Flats for snow, clipless for everything else. Lots of hike-a-bike in winter riding and it gets annoying pretty fast when the cleats ice up and I can't clip in.

  39. #39
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    Riding flats since this summer. Really because of an injury. Haven't been able to twist my foot out of a spd pedal without pain, nor have I found any spd shoes that wasn't painful to wear.
    BUT last week I got the hardware removed from my foot so maybe, just maybe I might be able to chose what I want instead of pain chosing for me. I do prefer spd.

  40. #40
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    Recently switched to Flats, will give them a try for a month or so.
    I've been on SPDs since the early 90s...reason for the switch was a nasty crash.

    Haven't done a redemption ride yet :P
    Ride, Enjoy...Repeat.

  41. #41
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    Clipless 98% of the time, flats 2%. The only time I switch to flats is skills building.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    yeah it really comes down to your confidence and understanding of the potential risks of outcome. At almost 40yrs old (will be in Sept) the body just doesn't heal like it used too nor is quite as pliable. So crashes are a much more concerted effort of risk vs. reward. Once you get yourself into a bad crash that causes injury enough to mean time off the bike, well that will always stick in your head. Since my crash I am VERY aware of the terrain I am riding and now HATE loose crap like that. The likelihood of a similar crash with similar results happening is pretty slim but that is not a risk I am willing to take anymore.
    You think you heal slowly now, wait till 65. So crashing is not on my bucket list and yes you feel safer on flats but....I was riding Ft Custer on a 26 HT on flats. Came down a 15% in a a deep sand pit at the bottom. Put down my left foot and rotated the bike on a 45. Came to a stop and could not walk without pain for 9 months. Yep, saved a crash and suffered for months. So crashing is crashing, clipless or not. Everybody crashes or your not riding.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I use both so I can't vote.
    This.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    yeah it really comes down to your confidence and understanding of the potential risks of outcome. At almost 40yrs old (will be in Sept) the body just doesn't heal like it used too nor is quite as pliable. So crashes are a much more concerted effort of risk vs. reward. Once you get yourself into a bad crash that causes injury enough to mean time off the bike, well that will always stick in your head. Since my crash I am VERY aware of the terrain I am riding and now HATE loose crap like that. The likelihood of a similar crash with similar results happening is pretty slim but that is not a risk I am willing to take anymore.
    I got ten on you :-)
    As a road motorcyclist with a my share of crashes (on and off the track), I can totally relate. I tell people that being older, i still bounce like when I was younger (though I was in my 30's when I was racing), it just takes longer to stop hurting.

    Anyway, my fear of losing the front in the dirt stems from my road riding. Always figure there'd be no saving it.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimF777 View Post
    I got ten on you :-)
    As a road motorcyclist with a my share of crashes (on and off the track), I can totally relate. I tell people that being older, i still bounce like when I was younger (though I was in my 30's when I was racing), it just takes longer to stop hurting.

    Anyway, my fear of losing the front in the dirt stems from my road riding. Always figure there'd be no saving it.
    Yeah I had the same thing happen to me once. Losing the front isn't as big a deal to me but an uncontrolled slide is up at the top of things I am wary of, especially when the terrain turns to sand or small pea gravel.

  46. #46
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    I've been riding SPD clipless since the latter part of the 90's. Once and a while I try flats, but that only lasts for a ride, then I'm back to clipless. It's second nature to me, and now I'm to old and stubborn to relearn. The funny thing is (to me anyway), it's on techy, steep rough stuff that I'm least comfortable or confident on with flats.
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  47. #47
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    Been riding clipless (Frogs) for ~20 years, so they are just second nature to me. I can put a foot down with these as fast as with flats (I am sure it is slower but the difference is utterly negligible). Clipping back in is also ridiculously fast and easy. So I don’t find flats to really give me any more confidence.

    I do run flats every so often just for the change, but clipless is always what I feel the most comfortable with, especially in rough/technical terrain.

    When it drops below 40 deg F, I switch to flats because my clip less shoes (the metal cleats) make my feet cold, so all my winter fat biking is on flats.

    Commuting I run flats.

    Road riding I run both.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  48. #48
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    I am happy to say that giving clipped a chance, I lost the front Saturday and, though it may be a fluke, before I knew it I was supporting myself on the rock and my inner foot was on the ground. Hopeful.

    I'm finding it takes WAY TOO LONG to get the cleat into the pedal.

  49. #49
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    One day I was literally a multi-user.

    I forgot my clipless shoes and used a pair of running shoes on my SPD pedals on the road bike.
    It would have been easier to climb the 1.5 mile hill had there been a larger platform to rest my foot on, but otherwise no problems. And for our group ride (25 miles) I wasn't yelling ahead asking people to 'wait up', because I know how to pedal a bicycle.

    Clipless benefit -not for me it isn't. I keep then on the road bike because I don't want to buy pedals when I already have a set.

    I'm more of a MTB rider. One day on the road bike I guess I forgot what I was going. I tried to wheelie up a curb while waiting around and darn near ate it. I lost balance and started to tip. I had a hard time unclipping, not sure why though), but did get out in time to not hit any important body parts on the top tube. I was 'this close' to falling but was able to save myself just in the nick of time.
    Yes it will become 2nd nature but it's not something I want to deal with on a MTB. I goof off too often to consider myself a candidate for clipless on MTB.

  50. #50
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    Flats makes you a much better all round rider. Rode with clipless for over 18 years now only ride with 5 tens.
    Been riding with flats for 4 years now. Easy to move foot around on pedal, easy to put foot out around sharp corners for extra balance. Much more freedom of movement when hitting drop offs etc.

    Have a look at my YouTube Channel Trail Biker Terry its 6 weeks old now and please subscribe if you like its free.
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  51. #51
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    Did you read that article about the guy who couldn't unclip fast enough on a tech climb and fell over into a snake pit and had to goto the hospital for anti venom. Probably a $50k bill. I guess you can say that flats can save you $50k

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  52. #52
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    I rode toe clips and straps from 1985 until 1994, when Onza sponsored our XC race team and I got a set of those awful elastomer-sprung pedals (the brakes and tires too, omg, so much fail). From there, my former weight-weenie self switched to Ritchey (Wellgo) clipless instead of Shimano SPD-M737s until the smaller and lighter 747 came out.

    In 2007, I wasn't racing anymore and was more focused on technical skill than speed so I decided to try flats and quickly learned that I had developed some bad habits, like lifting with my feet when I bunny hopped. I know a few riders who came from the womb with spd cleats in their feet and have great form on drops, jumps, etc. Not me. For the next several years, I went back and forth. I'd take a few months to get comfortable with flats, able once again to bunny hop a decent sized curb, but when some especially big ride came along, i'd put the clipless pedals back on and immediately feel comfortable with them. When I got around to switching pedals again, I had to go through the learning curve all over.

    I've now been on flats only since 2014. I still have my old Sidi Dominators and SPD-M959s but I don't have any plans to use them again.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  53. #53
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    Ok, I feel stupid, was just at the bike shop and was discussing this very topic, ans as soon as the word "clipless" came out, I asked why I've been wrong, thinking clipped is what I'm using? You know, since I clip the cleat into that thingamajig.

    So, I'm using clipless, and the flats are not clipless.

    Next up, i before e, except....

  54. #54
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    Back in the days roadies clipped into their pedal cages using straps. When cleats came out it was considered clipless. Flats is just flats.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  55. #55
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    Used to be all flats then switched to all clipless for over 2 years now.

  56. #56
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    Darn it, up to that point you were riding the preferred, now you're just backwards. LOL

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Back in the days roadies clipped into their pedal cages using straps. When cleats came out it was considered clipless. Flats is just flats.

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    ..
    Surly Krampus
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  58. #58
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    I rode those days. Toe clips with leather straps ruled the day. Won some races with those bad boys. Biggest drawback was when you were using the non clip side, the metal clips scraped the ground. That caused ugly scratches on the toe clips. But they worked well and shoe choice was unlimited as long as you could get your toe in the clip.

  59. #59
    Bent, not broken.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ..
    The left bottle had Gin, the right bottle, tonic. Limes in musette bag. One does not want to suffer the effects of malaria or scurvy in the tour.

    They were a different breed, we'll never see the likes of them again.
    I got no new tricks, yeah I'm up on bricks but me
    I'm a machine and I was built to last - Frank Turner.

  60. #60
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    I ride large platform clipless; Time ATAC Z control. They're a little heavy and dated, but so is the rest of my bike and I don't mind. The platform is big enough that even if I miss the clip in right away, I still have enough shoe on the pedal to be stable.
    I got no new tricks, yeah I'm up on bricks but me
    I'm a machine and I was built to last - Frank Turner.

  61. #61
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    I'm finding that getting out of clippless is no longer my biggest concern. I can't seem to get back into them >:^(

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimF777 View Post
    I'm finding that getting out of clippless is no longer my biggest concern. I can't seem to get back into them >:^(

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    Of course ride what you like but if you call yourself a mountain bike rider you should be able to ride both pedal types.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Of course ride what you like but if you call yourself a mountain bike rider you should be able to ride both pedal types.
    Yeah, I've called myself many things, not as many as my wife has called me, but I'm working on clippless as I've been riding on flats. So I won't call myself a mountain bike rider, at least not yet

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Of course ride what you like but if you call yourself a mountain bike rider you should be able to ride both pedal types.
    Wow....

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Of course ride what you like but if you call yourself a mountain bike rider you should be able to ride both pedal types.
    Lol come on, that was not necessary. I have flats even on my gravel bike.
    Surly Krampus
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  66. #66
    change is good
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    What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?

    I’m getting old
    1. Started with clipped. Unbelievably dangerous on mountain bikes
    2: went to clipless. The Richeys weren’t bad.
    3. Time ATACs, the yellow soap bars. Hated them until I started using modified cleats from Speed Goat then lovvved them.
    4. The newer Times started sucking azz with apathetic CS.
    5. Shimano XTs - cheap, tough, tensioning worked and was consistent,long lasting cleats. Mediocre in mud and limited float which many like.
    6. Flats - rode for a year. Fun but less power transfer
    7. Now on Mallet Es - kind of finicky setup and I’ve done a few turtles. Didn’t realize how much I miss the power transfer although I don’t think I’m much slower on flats.


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    Last edited by DrDon; 03-31-2019 at 11:13 AM.

  67. #67
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    Race car drives will race whatever they can get behind the wheel. Mountain bike riders can jump on any bike and have fun. If you cannot do that, what do you call yourself?

  68. #68
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    I ride both and here are my thoughts.

    Power, not enough difference for me to notice.

    Float, flats have 0°

    Foot positioning, with clips my feet are always positioned perfectly.

    Putting a foot down, not an issue until it's very slippery, then flats have the advantage.

    Some of the best technical climbers I know are on flats, so this is a wash.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalon2018 View Post
    Race car drives will race whatever they can get behind the wheel. Mountain bike riders can jump on any bike and have fun. If you cannot do that, what do you call yourself?
    Again with your pretentious comments.

    Thanks for stirring the pot. The forums wouldn't be the same without you.

  70. #70
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    Flats

    Good grip on dry and wet. Need to jump off MTB easy. What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?-pedl-.jpg
    MONGOOSE LEDGE 3.1 29ER 2013
    DIAMONDBACK RECOIL COMP 29ER 2013
    MOTOBECANE FANTOM DS COMP 29ER 2018

  71. #71
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    Maybe you could use a good dictionary. Travel Safe my Friend.

  72. #72
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    What do you ride with? Flat or Clipless pedals?

    Quote Originally Posted by JimF777 View Post
    I'm finding that getting out of clippless is no longer my biggest concern. I can't seem to get back into them >:^(

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
    Yep. At first I had trouble because I was thinking about it, “looking”, “feeling” to find the pedals. Now I just throw the feet, start pedaling without thinking about it, and somehow I always find the pedals.
    I use Shimano SPD 540s which are double sided.

  73. #73
    change is good
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    Annoyed. I have a hard time uncliipping my 2FOs from my Mallet Es on slow steep techy ups. Turtleing my only hurts my butt it also hurts my pride. Not sure if I need to wait for the shoe pedal interface to wear in or use more English when trying to disengage. Otherwise I like the combo better than flats or my ME7/XT combo but all three setups are pretty good.


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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post

    Putting a foot down, not an issue until it's very slippery, then flats have the advantage.
    That about sums it up.

    Riding Whistler Garbo zone tech roots after a rain is about the only time I felt like I needed flats...

  75. #75
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    since 2002 Speedplay Frog's
    get fresh air and stay fit

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