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  1. #1
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    Stick with Enduro ? ? ?

    Been off the bike for a few years now and want to get a new one.

    I used to ride a 2004 Specialized Enduro with 130/120 mm suspension, but the new enduro bikes have much more travel.

    Should I stick with an enduro type bike with more travel than I am used to? or should I get the equivalent travel in more of a trail bike?

    I'm not a thrill seeker looking for huge drops or anything, and since I'm pushing 40 now, I don't think I'll ever get that crazy, but I do like to stick with mostly high speeds downhill with moderate technical stuff thrown in for fun. Not interested in fitness cross country stuff - I just want to ride and have fun.

    My Medium framed Specialized Enduro was actually a little undersized for me at 6'-0" so I compensated with a longer stem. It worked, but I'm ready to get a new bike in Large now that I'm getting back into it.

    Thanks for any advice.
    Last edited by dagoof; 08-05-2018 at 07:18 AM.

  2. #2
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    Look at the 2019 Stumpjumper ST. With 2.6 29 tires(on the Expert regular non ST) it's more capable than your old bike. No more proprietary shock dimension either. 2.3 tires on the Carbon Comp ST.
    It also comes in a longer travel version. Specialized has lengthened the reach but you should test ride a L unless you have longer than average for your height legs. Short stems are the norm now. You can't really use a long stem anymore.

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  3. #3
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    A modern 120/120 bike will be more capable than your old Enduro. A modern 160/160 bike will be massively different, and will still probably out climb your old bike.

    You have a lot of options with new bikes, and I think they're all better than what you had. It's a good time to buy a bike!

  4. #4
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    Sorry. Meant to say 2004 Enduro - not sure how I got the year confused.

    This is my old ride.

    Stick with Enduro ? ? ?-2004-specialized-enduro-comp.jpg

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    I'll edit the original post.

  5. #5
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    i used to own a 2004 Enduro Expert. it was a nice bike in its day but really more of a trail bike than an “enduro” one. id recommend at least a couple demo day rides to get a feel for sizing and categories.


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  6. #6
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    My call is get a 150 rear, 160mm front travel 27.5" bike in size large.

    It will be fantastic and do everything that you want it to do and more.

  7. #7
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    So I was just starting to lean towards a Stumpjumper or Canyon Spectral, but decided to stop into the only bike shop we have in town.

    They are adamant that I should stick with an Enduro, and also adamant that I should go with 29.

    I'm kinda worried that jumping straight from a Medium frame on 26's with 120mm travel all the way to a Large frame on 29's with 170mm of travel might be too huge of a change for me.

    I know I don't "need" that much bike, cuz I'm not a downhill racer or stunt jumper, but is there any reason to consider a smaller bike than the current Enduro?

    I don't care about fitness or cross country racing, but I'm also not about to enter the Red Bull Rampage. I just want to have fun, fly down single track, and also enjoy the technical stuff when it comes up.

  8. #8
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    ^^^ yeah. 29 is probably good but certainly not not 170mm. One thing you might do is find and go on some group rides in the areas you like to ride and see what others are riding. I ride in the woods with sharp ups and downs, technical, and ending where we started. I'd say half the really experience riders are on hard tails and the other half on 100-130 mm FS bikes. I ride 120 FS as I'm older and can sit down a bit more.
    Do the math.

  9. #9
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    I ride loop trails occasionally, but more often than not, I arrange to have someone drop us off at the top.

    I used to love doing Porcipine Rim in Moab every spring if that means anything to you guys, but lately I head for downhill single track with a mixture of tight switchbacks winding through trees, bumps to hop off, smooth sections, and occasional technical patches.

  10. #10
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    Until this year I would stand on my soapbox and scream how useless enduro bikes are that can't climb and only are made for going downhill and not a slight bit of enjoying uphill.

    designs are better with seat tube angles, suspension setups etc.

    Im 49 and have a Ripmo on order and can't wait.

  11. #11
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    I don't know why the shop is so adamant about you getting a longer travel bike. From what you describe that's not what you need. Demo 27.5 and 29 to first determine what wheel size you'd lean towards.. and 130-150 rear travel is a good range to look at for a good all around trail bike (possibly a touch less for a 29er) Check other shops.. and don't rule out a year or two old used bike if you wanna stretch your money. Once you're more certain after test riding, definitely repost and we can help you with some options.

  12. #12
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    I think either a trail bike or an enduro bike would work based on your self-described riding preferences. I think you're on the right track with a Stumpy or similar type of ride if you are going to start pedaling your climbs more in the future. Today's trail bikes are incredibly capable and will out downhill your old 2004 Enduro in spades. They also pedal amazingly well so maybe if you go that route, you'll be more inclined to pedal your climbs and increase your fitness (which could be a nice bonus).

    Today's enduro bikes do pedal way better than you would think they could given their travel coming from an early 2000's perspective. If you think you're still going to mostly be doing shuttled rides, then an enduro bike might be the ticket. You'll still be able to pedal it when you do pedal your climbs, and the extra travel is a plus in most DH situations. If your local trails are pretty steep or chunky, or if you plan to hit the bike park regularly as well then the scales might tip towards enduro.

    Wheel size is totally personal preference, and there is definitely a different feel to a 29er vs. 27.5. I feel pretty strongly that one is not better than the other, overall, but there are definitely advantages to each in certain types of trails and features (e.g., 29ers no question better for straight line speed downhill, 27.5 feels better in the air to me and accelerates faster out of corners and jumps, etc.). Read up a little on the advantage on each and make the choice that seems to fit best. Regardless, coming from an 04 Enduro to a 2018 or 2019 model is going to be a huge step forward.
    Last edited by Padlz; 08-07-2018 at 09:04 AM. Reason: Misread your last post about getting shuttled most of the time

  13. #13
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    Thanks

  14. #14
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    New geometry is longer lower and slacker. All new designs will feel like a bus to turn compared to your steep short 2004 frame. That said they will be sooooo much more capable once you relearn stearing response. After a couple of rides on the new geometry you will jump back on the old bike and think how did I ever ride this short steep twitchy beast.

    Jumping to new geometry 27.5 will be a massive change. Going to 29 might just be too much. They are more bus like and less responsive than 27.5 and feel completely different to 26.

    That said 29 does have some advantages. They are better pedalers, roll over bigger bumps easier. They are pretty much faster on easy track and straight chunky stuff, both up and down. But 29 is even slower to turn and the tighter and steeper the single track the worse they go.

    So open wide fast 29er, tight twisty steep 27.5. In between theres a huge grey area that both designs rock and it comes down to preference and your local trail mix.

    As for more or less travel. That will depend on the max gnar you want to ride and how tech your local trails are.
    120mm will be more snappy and fun on the easy stuff, but it will be challenging when it gets steap and tech.150mm gives you a good alround bike that can handle most trails.
    170mm has a lot of squish it will eat big lines up for breakfast. Infact they will be more capable than a 2004 dh bike. 170mm won't be as snappy on the easy stuff. To some degree it will make easy trails a bit dull.

    All bikes even 170mm monster will climb better than your 2004 bike. Its amazing how big travel bikes pedal now.

    If I was you I would ask myself what do I enjoy to ride the most?

    Steep, tech, gnarly? 27.5 160+mm
    Twisty, tight not crazy gnarly buy some good chunk. 27.5 150mm.
    Chunky straighter faster. 29 150mm
    Flowing single track, open 29 120mm
    Flowing single track tight 27.5 120mm.

  15. #15
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    If you felt like your 120mm enduro was capable, you should try a modern 120mm bike. It'll be quite a bit more capable, pedal better, climb better, and be more planted.

    If thats the case, you'd probably feel like a modern enduro bike is grossly overkill for your trails. It'll flatten everything to the point of being boring.

    If you found yourself being sketched out and in over your head often, you'd love a new, bigger bike.

  16. #16
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    A modern 120, or so rear, would be more than sufficient based on your post.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post

    All new designs will feel like a bus to turn compared to your steep short 2004 frame.

    Jumping to new geometry 27.5 will be a massive change. Going to 29 might just be too much.

    170mm won't be as snappy on the easy stuff. To some degree it will make easy trails a bit dull.
    That's kinda what I've been afraid of.

    I really liked my old enduro and though I would love to upgrade, I don't want to buy a huge monster truck just because that's what the new enduros have become.

    I bought an enduro because I like to dabble in the technical chunck (alla Procupine Rim Moab) but I also like to be able to have fun, hop off stuff, and scream around tight turns through the woods.

    Sounds like I don't really "need" an enduro anymore. Just gotta decide if I want to get more aggressive myself because the newer bike technology has allowed for more aggressive bikes.

  18. #18
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    Try a stumpjumper. It sounds like what you're looking for.

    The enduro has become a race bike. Its a big huge school bus of a plow bike these days.

  19. #19
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    +1 on 'plummet' advice...

    "Twisty, tight not crazy gnarly buy some good chunk. 27.5 150mm."

    Lots of great choices. Just went from the 26" Heckler to the 27.5" Kona 153. My terrain is in this category and I'm on an XL frame. I was afraid an XL 29 would be too long in the tight terrain but wanted similar travel as the 150mm Heckler. The new geo is super fun and plenty nimble on tight NE singletrack...even though it's heavier than my Heckler it climbs awesome (no lift accessed riding). Newer bikes are great...I'm 58 and riding challenging terrain as confidently as I ever have.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  20. #20
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    Thanks everyone for all the great advice.

    I think I'm going to order a Canyon Spectral unless someone can talk me out of it.

  21. #21
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    The Spectral's supposed to be a good bike..I read something about a slow engaging rear hub which might not bother you but thought I'd mention it. Not sure of your budget but take a look at the 2018 giant trance 2.. Great spec for the money.

  22. #22
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    I'd look at YT's before ordering a canyon. And commencal.

  23. #23
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    I just got a Bulls Wild Cup 3 with 150mm of travel front/rear and 27.5 wheels. My last full suspension bike was a '99 K2. For the past few years I've been riding hartails. OMG, to say there's a huge difference is an understatement!

    I thought it might be too much travel but I was wrong. It really helps take the "beating" out of the rough stuff (I'm approaching 50yrs. of age). I have the ability to lockout the front/rear suspension, but I rarely feel the need to do it...despite having almost 6" of travel, it doesn't feel like a pogo stick.

    I've never ridden an enduro bike, but given the capabilities of this trail bike, not sure I'd ever need that much more suspension...

  24. #24
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    Looking for more advice.

    Since the snow is flying here in Idaho, I've got time to study up and make my decision.

    I'm considering a handful of bikes:

    1. CANYON SPECTRAL - (140/150 travel w/ 66 degree head angle)
    Great spec for the cost. More travel than my old Enduro. Supposed to be very playful.

    2. SPECIALIZED STUMPY EVO - (150/150 travel w 63.5 degree head angle)
    More expensive for lower spec. Supposed to be really fun on the down hill which is what I like.

    3. IBIS MOJO HD4 - (153/160 travel w/ 64.9 degree head angle)
    Love the looks. Costs a bit more.

    I'm also open to a YT bike, though the head angles are steeper, a Santa Cruz bike though kind of expensive, or any others. I'd love advice on these three, and I'm open to suggestions too. So give me your advice.

    For reference again, I've ridden my old Enduro since 2004. I'm 6'-0" and 240 lbs so my medium sized frame has probably been too small for me all along. I'm figuring on moving up to a large size frame so I'm not over the bars so much, and I think that the new bike geometry will help with that too.

    I'm an amature out of shape and don't ride as often as I would like. I'm not an extreme down-hiller that hits big jumps or drops, but I do prefer shuttle trails or anything that doesn't leave me peddling for large amounts of time. I have plenty of access to mountains here in Idaho and Utah. My favorite trails are fast smooth downhill stuff through the forest, but I also like to bunny hop off of bumps and enjoy the occasional rock garden technical stuff. I go on an occasional trip to Moab Porcupine Rim or a local ski lift.

    I don't think I need a burly DH bike cuz I'm not that crazy. I do like to point it downward and fly down trails while being playful on the bumps though.
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    Most any modern mid travel trail bike in an appropriate size (L for you I’m guessing) is going to be a massive improvement compared to your old bike.

    I recommend looking at the new Kona Satori and the Transition Smuggler. They’re different, but awesome and super capable bikes that can cover all sorts of riding- all day trail rides to the bike park. Good luck on your search.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulsepro View Post

    Transition Smuggler.
    I was actually just looking at Transition, but leaning towards the Patrol or Scout.

    I don't race and don't care about pedaling real fast, so I figured that 27.5 would be better for fun factor.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    Looking for more advice.

    Since the snow is flying here in Idaho, I've got time to study up and make my decision.

    I'm considering a handful of bikes:

    1. CANYON SPECTRAL - (140/150 travel w/ 66 degree head angle)
    Great spec for the cost. More travel than my old Enduro. Supposed to be very playful.

    2. SPECIALIZED STUMPY EVO - (150/150 travel w 63.5 degree head angle)
    More expensive for lower spec. Supposed to be really fun on the down hill which is what I like.

    3. IBIS MOJO HD4 - (153/160 travel w/ 64.9 degree head angle)
    Love the looks. Costs a bit more.

    I'm also open to a YT bike, though the head angles are steeper, a Santa Cruz bike though kind of expensive, or any others. I'd love advice on these three, and I'm open to suggestions too. So give me your advice.

    For reference again, I've ridden my old Enduro since 2004. I'm 6'-0" and 240 lbs so my medium sized frame has probably been too small for me all along. I'm figuring on moving up to a large size frame so I'm not over the bars so much, and I think that the new bike geometry will help with that too.

    I'm an amature out of shape and don't ride as often as I would like. I'm not an extreme down-hiller that hits big jumps or drops, but I do prefer shuttle trails or anything that doesn't leave me peddling for large amounts of time. I have plenty of access to mountains here in Idaho and Utah. My favorite trails are fast smooth downhill stuff through the forest, but I also like to bunny hop off of bumps and enjoy the occasional rock garden technical stuff. I go on an occasional trip to Moab Porcupine Rim or a local ski lift.

    I don't think I need a burly DH bike cuz I'm not that crazy. I do like to point it downward and fly down trails while being playful on the bumps though.
    You really need to test ride some bikes. When’s the last time you rode? I demo’d an Ibis HD4 at Downieville, last year...that bike was way overkill for there. That head angle and great suspension need steep trails, Downieville isn’t steep.
    Based on your descriptions above, I would recommend a 120/130mm rear, and 140/150mm up front; 27.5” or 29”. 29er wheels allow you to roll over stuff better...therefore less travel will still work great. You need to realize that bikes have come a long way since 2004; geometry is better, suspension works better, forks are stiffer...I think your local shop is steering you wrong, you don’t need 170mm of travel; you said that you prefer fast smooth trails.
    Just my 2 cents worth...good luck

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    Looking for more advice.

    Since the snow is flying here in Idaho, I've got time to study up and make my decision.

    I'm considering a handful of bikes:

    1. CANYON SPECTRAL - (140/150 travel w/ 66 degree head angle)
    Great spec for the cost. More travel than my old Enduro. Supposed to be very playful.

    2. SPECIALIZED STUMPY EVO - (150/150 travel w 63.5 degree head angle)
    More expensive for lower spec. Supposed to be really fun on the down hill which is what I like.

    3. IBIS MOJO HD4 - (153/160 travel w/ 64.9 degree head angle)
    Love the looks. Costs a bit more.

    I'm also open to a YT bike, though the head angles are steeper, a Santa Cruz bike though kind of expensive, or any others. I'd love advice on these three, and I'm open to suggestions too. So give me your advice.

    For reference again, I've ridden my old Enduro since 2004. I'm 6'-0" and 240 lbs so my medium sized frame has probably been too small for me all along. I'm figuring on moving up to a large size frame so I'm not over the bars so much, and I think that the new bike geometry will help with that too.

    I'm an amature out of shape and don't ride as often as I would like. I'm not an extreme down-hiller that hits big jumps or drops, but I do prefer shuttle trails or anything that doesn't leave me peddling for large amounts of time. I have plenty of access to mountains here in Idaho and Utah. My favorite trails are fast smooth downhill stuff through the forest, but I also like to bunny hop off of bumps and enjoy the occasional rock garden technical stuff. I go on an occasional trip to Moab Porcupine Rim or a local ski lift.

    I don't think I need a burly DH bike cuz I'm not that crazy. I do like to point it downward and fly down trails while being playful on the bumps though.
    63.5 is pretty darn slack. That will be sweet on the down but real flip floppy on the steep up.

    66 deg is too steep in my opinion these days. It will be playfull on easy but a handfull on steep.

    64-65 deg hta is the magic number for enduro bikes these days.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    I was actually just looking at Transition, but leaning towards the Patrol or Scout.

    I don't race and don't care about pedaling real fast, so I figured that 27.5 would be better for fun factor.
    The patrol absolutely rips... and as many reviews state it is much more lively then the numbers would suggest. You need to like a steep seat tube angle (a dream IMO) and the BB is pretty low so technical climbing is a bit hindered.

    I couldn't imagine a much better bike - for me - despite some tradeoffs, but it's a lot of bike compared to your old relic.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    63.5 is pretty darn slack. That will be sweet on the down but real flip floppy on the steep up.

    66 deg is too steep in my opinion these days. It will be playfull on easy but a handfull on steep.

    64-65 deg hta is the magic number for enduro bikes these days.
    The Transition Patrol has a 64 degree angle, but it's got a lot more travel.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    Looking for more advice.

    Since the snow is flying here in Idaho, I've got time to study up and make my decision.

    I'm considering a handful of bikes:

    1. CANYON SPECTRAL - (140/150 travel w/ 66 degree head angle)
    Great spec for the cost. More travel than my old Enduro. Supposed to be very playful.

    2. SPECIALIZED STUMPY EVO - (150/150 travel w 63.5 degree head angle)
    More expensive for lower spec. Supposed to be really fun on the down hill which is what I like.

    3. IBIS MOJO HD4 - (153/160 travel w/ 64.9 degree head angle)
    Love the looks. Costs a bit more.

    I'm also open to a YT bike, though the head angles are steeper, a Santa Cruz bike though kind of expensive, or any others. I'd love advice on these three, and I'm open to suggestions too. So give me your advice.

    For reference again, I've ridden my old Enduro since 2004. I'm 6'-0" and 240 lbs so my medium sized frame has probably been too small for me all along. I'm figuring on moving up to a large size frame so I'm not over the bars so much, and I think that the new bike geometry will help with that too.

    I'm an amature out of shape and don't ride as often as I would like. I'm not an extreme down-hiller that hits big jumps or drops, but I do prefer shuttle trails or anything that doesn't leave me peddling for large amounts of time. I have plenty of access to mountains here in Idaho and Utah. My favorite trails are fast smooth downhill stuff through the forest, but I also like to bunny hop off of bumps and enjoy the occasional rock garden technical stuff. I go on an occasional trip to Moab Porcupine Rim or a local ski lift.

    I don't think I need a burly DH bike cuz I'm not that crazy. I do like to point it downward and fly down trails while being playful on the bumps though.
    The Canyon and the IBIS are going to be better all arounders. As far as the Canyon goes, how good are you at maintaining your own bike- if you're pretty good at it, seems like a solid choice. The people I know who have them seem pleased. The IBIS has some longish sounding numbers but it's really just a 'leggy' all arounder. The EVO is the one that needs the test ride the most. It's pushing the envelope with geometry. I would personally think the regular stump jumper is the best all around bike of specialized line up unless you are riding.

    I'm on the other side of the state, but I've done the Grand Targhee Resort area which isn't too far from you. Any good modern in the 130-150 range would work well there. For reference I did almost everything there on a Trek Stache which is an oddball hardtail if you aren't familiar, but I got beat up. I would actually think that Smuggler would be a good choice there- but I haven't ridden that bike so that's just off stats. I would choose the scout over the patrol.

  32. #32
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    I started with a 120/130 bike and moved to a 140/150 bike. IMO 140/150 travel bikes are perfect. Today's bikes in that travel range pedal amazing, and they have plenty of suspension to handle nearly everything.

    I used to be of the "too much bike" camp until I rode a modern 140/150 bike. You wont ever hear those words come out of my mouth again for that range of bikes with todays kinematics and geometry.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    Looking for more advice.

    Since the snow is flying here in Idaho, I've got time to study up and make my decision.

    I'm considering a handful of bikes:

    1. CANYON SPECTRAL - (140/150 travel w/ 66 degree head angle)
    Great spec for the cost. More travel than my old Enduro. Supposed to be very playful.

    2. SPECIALIZED STUMPY EVO - (150/150 travel w 63.5 degree head angle)
    More expensive for lower spec. Supposed to be really fun on the down hill which is what I like.

    3. IBIS MOJO HD4 - (153/160 travel w/ 64.9 degree head angle)
    Love the looks. Costs a bit more.

    I'm also open to a YT bike, though the head angles are steeper, a Santa Cruz bike though kind of expensive, or any others. I'd love advice on these three, and I'm open to suggestions too. So give me your advice.

    For reference again, I've ridden my old Enduro since 2004. I'm 6'-0" and 240 lbs so my medium sized frame has probably been too small for me all along. I'm figuring on moving up to a large size frame so I'm not over the bars so much, and I think that the new bike geometry will help with that too.

    I'm an amature out of shape and don't ride as often as I would like. I'm not an extreme down-hiller that hits big jumps or drops, but I do prefer shuttle trails or anything that doesn't leave me peddling for large amounts of time. I have plenty of access to mountains here in Idaho and Utah. My favorite trails are fast smooth downhill stuff through the forest, but I also like to bunny hop off of bumps and enjoy the occasional rock garden technical stuff. I go on an occasional trip to Moab Porcupine Rim or a local ski lift.

    I don't think I need a burly DH bike cuz I'm not that crazy. I do like to point it downward and fly down trails while being playful on the bumps though.
    Out of every bike on the list, Ibis or YT Jeffsy would be my picks. Ibis linkage kinematics are awesome. And the YT just gives an insane value for the money with good geometry numbers IMO. 66 degree HA is alright, 65 would be better. But 66 degress wouldnt scare me away from the Jeffsy.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    Been off the bike for a few years now and want to get a new one.

    I used to ride a 2004 Specialized Enduro with 130/120 mm suspension, but the new enduro bikes have much more travel.

    Should I stick with an enduro type bike with more travel than I am used to? or should I get the equivalent travel in more of a trail bike?

    I'm not a thrill seeker looking for huge drops or anything, and since I'm pushing 40 now, I don't think I'll ever get that crazy, but I do like to stick with mostly high speeds downhill with moderate technical stuff thrown in for fun. Not interested in fitness cross country stuff - I just want to ride and have fun.
    I have to go back to your original post. Any new short travel 29er today will blow away your old bike.
    Not.
    Even.
    Close.
    My 130/115 travel 29er blows away my SB5 LR 160/127.
    My SB5 LR blew away my Pivot 5.7 carbon 150/145.

    Each subsequent bike blew the previous one out of the water up and down.

    I think you're going for overkill on the travel, but get what you think is best for your needs. If your only real concern is the descents, go with more travel.

  35. #35
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    I briefly had a Diamondback. It was the cheapest version from Performance/Nashbar (get well soon, Performance) and it worked great. 27.5, 150 front / 130 rear. Pretty much a clone of the SC 5010 and direct competitor to a Stumpjumper. I have to say I liked it a lot better than the Ibis Mojo 3 that I demo'd, but the Mojo had a Pike fork, which no one seems to love. Since I had that bike, they've introduced a carbon version. They're not the very best bikes you can get but they will carry your dollar a long, long way.


    This year, "long travel 29er" is what the market is pushing, and no one seems to mind much, except people who had the latest thing last year (plus tires are plush and forgiving) and see it dissed in the ad copy this year (plus tires are vague and sloppy).

  36. #36
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    I don't know that I "need" large travel, but I also don't "need" a lightweight pedal uphill bike either.

    I've survived all these years on my 120mm travel bike so I know that it can be done. It's just a question of what will be more fun.

    My favorite trail is a 5 mile downhill stretch between the trees. There is about 1,500 ft of elevation drop and I usually do it as a shuttle because I'm lazy. It's a fast trail that is mostly flowy with a couple of rock gardens thrown in as well as three stream crossings. There are lots of ATV speed bumps that I love to hop off. Here is a link: https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/701...reek-trail-082

    In addition, I usually take an annual trip to Moab UT for a ride down the very technical Porcupine Rim trail on the rock, and I also take the occasional trip to the ski lifts at Grand Targhee, Jackson Hole Pass, or Alpine UT ski resort.

    I don't hit any big jumps (more than 3') cuz I don't have enough cojones, so I know I don't need a burly downhill rig, but I do love to go fast and I really enjoy being able to go through the occasional technical stuff.

    I don't really know how this compares to other riding across the world, but I really appreciate the advice.
    Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    I usually take an annual trip to Moab UT for a ride down the very technical Porcupine Rim trail on the rock, and I also take the occasional trip to the ski lifts at Grand Targhee, Jackson Hole Pass, or Alpine UT ski resort.
    I live south of you in Park City Utah. A short travel 29er will get you up to Burro on The Whole Enchilada and get you down TWE (the lower part which is porcupine) so much better than your old Specialized that you'll think you're on a motorcycle. But, if you're happy shuttling, get more travel. You'll have more fun.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I have to go back to your original post. Any new short travel 29er today will blow away your old bike.
    Not.
    Even.
    Close.
    My 130/115 travel 29er blows away my SB5 LR 160/127.
    My SB5 LR blew away my Pivot 5.7 carbon 150/145.

    Each subsequent bike blew the previous one out of the water up and down.

    I think you're going for overkill on the travel, but get what you think is best for your needs. If your only real concern is the descents, go with more travel.
    The reverse of this is true though too- a new 120-130 travel will outclimb an old 100 travel and a new 150 will outclimb an old 120-130.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrIcky View Post
    The reverse of this is true though too- a new 120-130 travel will outclimb an old 100 travel and a new 150 will outclimb an old 120-130.
    That is also quite true! I'm just comparing a 2018 115 rear 29er to his old Specialized.

    "I have to go back to your original post. Any new short travel 29er today will blow away your old bike."

  40. #40
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    I think I'm gonna stick with 27.5" wheels. The big ones may be faster, but it seems like smaller ones with be more fun. I'm already stepping up from my old 26" wheels.

    Also,
    The new modern slacker geometry sounds great, but I don't understand why it took until now for bike makers to figure it out.
    Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

  41. #41
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    That's cool, and I agree- All I'm trying to get at is that a 150 doesn't mean you've got to ride the bus up these days.
    Last edited by MrIcky; 1 Week Ago at 08:44 AM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by dagoof View Post
    I think I'm gonna stick with 27.5" wheels. The big ones may be faster, but it seems like smaller ones with be more fun. I'm already stepping up from my old 26" wheels.

    Also,
    The new modern slacker geometry sounds great, but I don't understand why it took until now for bike makers to figure it out.
    As has been taught to me, and I don't know if it's gospel truth, but the widespread adoption of droppers and 1x drivetrains combined to make builders really start stretching.

    The seat tube used to have to be within a certain range of distances from a certain part of the chainring to make a front derailleur work. More upright seat tubes have always been good for pedaling but they really get in the way when you are trying to drop back behind the seat. Being able to quickly get the seat out of the way and not having to put a derailleur there and voila- steep STAs. And now that the STA is more upright you can move the front out which pulls your weight forward.

  43. #43
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    Try as many bikes as you can. Some of us are stuck in our ways.


  44. #44
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    Dagoof... like others have said... demo, demo, demo. Don't do (like I have) and get caught up in numbers. Opinions are a great place to start, but... they're all relative to typical riding conditions and preferences, which are not necessarily yours. Having said that, from what you've said throughout this thread... fun and snappy may be high on your list. In my opinion (there's that word again), 130-140 mm with 27.5's is where I'd start. But specific geometry makes a big difference. Back to... demo, demo, demo.

    So, now... gotta plug my favorite. You mention Canyon, so I assume you're OK with consumer direct purchases. If so, take a look at Whyte's latest line up. I've got a T-130 (130 mm). Not as commonplace as other brands, but a very capable, fun, quality, solid ride. I've said it before. Its 130 mm feels and rides like 150 when it's needed. Fast, and a great steep technical climber and descender. A blast on flow and jumps, and confident on gnarly jack hammer runs. Great 'do it all' trail bike.

    But... demo, demo, demo...
    You didn't quit riding because you're old, you're old because you quit riding.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredcook View Post

    From what you've said throughout this thread... fun and snappy may be high on your list.

    Fast, and a great steep technical climber and descender. A blast on flow and jumps, and confident on gnarly jack hammer runs. Great 'do it all' trail bike.
    Nailed it. That's what I want.
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