SRAM type 2 "Clutch" RD's and chain slap- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. SRAM type 2 "Clutch" RD's and chain slap

    do SRAM type 2 RD's (the X9 and X0) really reduce chain slap that much? and what is the difference in feel when shifting. Also if someone could go into detail about how they work that'd be mice, I get the basic jist, but i'd like to know more.

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Best way to control chain slap costs nothing.
    Shorten your chain to the minimum length i.e. Big ring front big ring back plus 2 links
    Don't use granny gear when you riding on roots etc or going downhill.
    I don't get any slap anymore.
    This is on North Shore Trails BC BTWCheers

  3. #3
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    The clutch really tightens up the main pivot, not allowing the lower pully of the derailleur to move forward. This keeps the chain tight.
    Shifting will be slightly more difficult with the "clutch" engaged, as you must force the derailleur to move forward when you shift.


    I dumped my XT Type 2 for a Sram X9 standard (I like grip shift). I never used the clutch at all.

    Shift up a ring, and downshift (larger cogs) at least two in the rear, and you can pretty much eliminate chain slap without some freakin' more expensive derailleur that is not needed. Best part? It's usually mighty close to the same gear ratio. Never had a "clutch", never had major chain slap issues using old school riding technique.

  4. #4
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    Yup nothing like low tech solutions that cost nothing

  5. #5
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    All performance MTN RDs come with a clutch these days. There is no downside to the clutch besides a few grams.
    Shifting in the rear feels the same as a non-clutch rd, but front shifting is a little bit heavier due to cage rotation.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reelchef67 View Post
    Best way to control chain slap costs nothing.
    Shorten your chain to the minimum length i.e. Big ring front big ring back plus 2 links
    Don't use granny gear when you riding on roots etc or going downhill.
    I don't get any slap anymore.
    This is on North Shore Trails BC BTWCheers
    Agreed... Granny to climb, biggie to descend. No slap, silent hustle!
    Todd :thumbsup:

  7. #7
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    I have a Shimano XT Shadow+ and I get 2-3 slaps per ride, down from dozens. It works decent, but the way people talk about it you'd think it was the next coming of jesus.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    All performance MTN RDs come with a clutch these days. There is no downside to the clutch besides a few grams.
    Shifting in the rear feels the same as a non-clutch rd, but front shifting is a little bit heavier due to cage rotation.
    True, except I can get an X9 standard for $68, or a Type 2 for $99.

  9. #9
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    Yes, the clutch/type 2 works. The chain no longer bounces around, and I don't care how you have your chain adjusted, the difference is pretty significant. I do find shifts take a little more push, my X5 takes less force actually, but the benefits are well worth it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    Re: SRAM type 2 "Clutch" RD's and chain slap

    I have to disagree with a couple guys here - there are definitely cases where big ring alone won't eliminate chain slap and a clutch rd makes the difference, particularly medium speed downhills with drops and jumps. Usually in these situations you're in 3rd or 4th gear and there's some natural slack in the chain. Clutch keeps it tight in these situations and prevents derailment, which is rare in big ring but still possible.

  11. #11
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    Yep. I was able to adjust my chain on my old RFX so that it didn't ever come off during jumps or hard DH stuff and I saw people all the time with the same and similar bikes using chainguides. It seemed a little silly to me, but even considering that, there's no comparison between that setup and my current type 2/xx1 front ring (1x10). There is NO chain movement and it's just silent. You don't notice it until it hits you out on the trail and you realize you're missing lots of noise, movement, and other stuff that you got with the older deraileurs. TO be sure, this is not a "must do" upgrade obviously. A bike will work just fine with an older deraileur. This IS on the other hand an upgrade that will make a pretty nice difference and it's not "hype".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  12. #12
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    My son rides his Scott genius LT30 fast and hard, actually very fast and very hard indeed.
    He was running a single front Wolf Tooth narrow wide chain ring with a guide and a medium cage X9 std derailleur, he would still drop a chain every couple of rides, particularly as he tends to start pedalling the split second after hitting the ground after big air which means he is in on the small ring on the cassette. The std derailleur would slap like a pimp controlling one of his hookers and the chain would bounce off.
    Swapping to a type 2 solved the problem instantly, he has even dropped off the lower roller on his guide, still runs the top guide as he wants the insurance considering he is heading in to the Enduro race season.
    Bottom line is that they work bloody well, particularly in conjunction with the correct length chain!

  13. #13
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    chain slap is VERY frame-dependent. I'm on a 1x10 and with the shape of my chainstays, there is no way I could have eliminated it with a regular derailleur and shortening the chain/b-tension adjustment/etc. An X9 Type2 solved the problem completely. Still rides very close to the stay in a few gears, but never hits it. It's worth the slight increase in price.
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  14. #14
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    The type2 made a huge difference for me.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb:skep:

  15. #15
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    Depends on the frame and the chain length. And the clutch helps keep the tension on the chain and cutting down on the amount of slap you may have.

  16. #16
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    As noted above, the proper chain length & descending in the big ring helps with eliminating chain slap. Respectfully, I think the folks above who've argued that you can achieve the same result just through proper setup are exaggerating. The clutched RDs do help to keep the chain from bouncing off your chainstay even if you already have a properly trimmed chain and keep the drivetrain in the big ring over the rough stuff.

    The type II RDs have greater spring pressure on the cage pivot and add a friction element (the clutch) to resist RD cage movement in response to forces acting on the chain. This helps to eliminate up/down movement of the chain as the rear end of the bike bounces over obstacles.

    I've had a clutched RD on my trailbike for around 2 years. They are definitely quieter. They will not eliminate ALL chain noise on rough & fast sections. Personally, I did not notice a huge benefit regarding chain retention from the clutched RDs, but others report that they have. Also, I've noted the little "klunk" noise during rear suspension movement that others on this board complained of, but it seemed to get better with the passage of time.

    A side note - the button on the type II RDs that locks the cage forward during rear wheel removal, by itself, is worth the extra dough for the type II RD. Love that feature. Makes installing your rear wheel considerably easier.

    I've got a X9 type II on my trailbike & a clutched Saint RD on my DH bike. Both have worked to make the bikes quieter. I'd recommend you pick one up if you're thinking about it.
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  17. #17
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    My 29er has a SRAM X9 type 2 drivetrain, and aside from the triggers working opposite the Shimano triggers on all my other bikes, I love it. REally has eliminate chain slap as far as I can tell.
    Shifts are nice and crisp too.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Mac View Post
    A side note - the button on the type II RDs that locks the cage forward during rear wheel removal, by itself, is worth the extra dough for the type II RD. Love that feature. Makes installing your rear wheel considerably easier.
    X9 rear D, where is the button?
    I had my rear wheel off (new bike, 1st 142 axle and sram D experience), and getting it back on made me hate life.
    My bike, Slayer 70

  19. #19
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    Have you seen the little lock button near the cage body? Move the cage forward past the lock point then press the little lock button to lock the cage in the forward position.

  20. #20
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  21. #21
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    I've found the SRAM typeII suff to greatly reduce chainslap. Three bikes with x.9 mechs, XX shifters, KMC chains. Running narrow/wide front rings on all three, with upper guides only, chains as short as possible. Two FS bikes and one hardtail. They are all super, super quiet in the chain department! The hardtail is eerily quiet.

    As fo the harder to shift bit: seems a touch harder shifting up, but not annoyingly so. A high quality cable/housing setup cut just as long as it needs to be, and with a run as free of cuves and kinks as possible makes it supah' smooth. Full housing run, and using alu end caps rather than the cheapy plastic ones.
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  22. #22
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    here's a video that might help those that are curious to understand how Sram does their clutch RDs. It's not a video of Sram's exact mechanism, but this is the general idea. Sram just allows their clutch to slip a little when rotated in the locking direction, rather than completely locking it out. Shimano's mechanism is different, and uses a sort of friction band around a shaft.

    Renold Trapped Roller Clutch - YouTube
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