So many bikes, and many different riding styles. Which would suit me?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    So many bikes, and many different riding styles. Which would suit me?

    Hey ya'll so here's some info about me. I'm in my late 30's 5"8 200 lbs rode bmx bikes when I was younger and always had a bike more for transportation and getting around. I currently own 2018 rockhopper 29er base large. I call it the "taint buster". I wanted to get back into riding so I went to my Lbs told them that I was looking to get back into mountain biking, some local trail riding and some paved rail trail cruising, but didn't know if I was going to use the bike as much so I stayed with a lower budget and ended up with a rockhopper. It's a large and a little big on me. Which is a decent bike but the better I got on the trails the bike just felt awkward, especially over rocky, rooty technical terrain. So now I'm looking to upgrade onto a new bike and have Decided on a full suspension, but not sure which one. My local trails that I ride consists of average to steep climbs and some fast technical descents, there are a good amount of roots and rocks and my taint just can't handle another hardtail and yes I've got padded shorts. I also want to be able to go to a bike park here and there I'm relatively close to mountain creek in New Jersey and windham mtn in ny. I've been researching trail bikes and enduro bikes. I'm starting to understand the geometry of the bike and what kind of travel I would be looking for. My work schedule is wacky so I haven't been able to demo bikes. I just would like some input and help cause I'm just feeling a bit overwhelmed on so many bikes. My price point max is 3200

  2. #2
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    Where do you ride? What style of riding, how aggressive, prioritization of climbing vs descending? Lots of variables.

    Check out the new Ripmo AF, base NX build is a lot of bike for $3k.


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  3. #3
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    Check out the Giant Trance or Trance 29. Lots of trim levels on those, you can stay in your budget, break it a little, break it a lot. Honestly, you can get a carbon frame with components that will get you on the trail and keep you there for a while for $150 over your "max" (this is the sort of thing that makes us all go for that little bit more? I'll find the money somewhere....) and they are very capable bikes. Because the rear travel is not long, it pedals well, but the geometry is such that the bike deals with aggressive descending way better than you'd think for how short the rear travel is. Also, if you LBS put you on a large at 5'8" you might not want to take their word for sizing on the next bike.

  4. #4
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    I agree with DETarch, check out the new aluminum frame Ibis Ripmo. For $3k you get a modern geo bike that should feel at home at the bike park and DVO suspension.

  5. #5
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    Ripmo AF is way too much travel and too low/long/slack for my type of east coast riding. Even the '20 Ripley is too much, but closer to what I consider ideal.
    Do the math.

  6. #6
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    Hey guys thanks for your input, haven't looked at the ibis yet. most of the trails I ride around me are mostly single tracks some flowy but mostly rocky rooty technical trails. most of the climbs aren't to bad but some are tough. Riding style not sure yet, I like to go as fast I CAN but with my current bike, sometimes I feel like I lose confidence while doing some technical trails and so I panic and slow down where I shouldn't. Yea my Lbs defitnely put me on a boat of a bike. I've been looking at the yt Jeffsy, Canyon Spectral, Nuke proof mega 290 pro. any input on Santa Cruz Hightower Lt carbon 29er? Are these bikes what I should be looking at for my type riding and what I want to do, and once I get better I can always upgrade components, and not feel like I have to buy a whole other bike. Im still new at this so not sure if im asking the right questions.

  7. #7
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    I suggest you find some experience locals to go riding with and check out what the experienced locals are riding to get an idea of what type/kind of bike might most appropriate. You can check with LBSs, local chapter of MBA etc, local Facebook mtb pages, etc. to find some group rides.
    Do the math.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    I suggest you find some experience locals to go riding with and check out what the experienced locals are riding to get an idea of what type/kind of bike might most appropriate. You can check with LBSs, local chapter of MBA etc, local Facebook mtb pages, etc. to find some group rides.
    Good call, see what locals ride.

    Still not sure where youíre located- that can be a major factor. Like Lone Rager said, Ripmo could be too much bike where he lives, but would be a great choice near me.


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    Thanks lone ranger, I know there are a few bike clubs that do group rides. its just difficult for me to meet up with them due to my work hours. I get out on two wheels when I can sometimes once a week, sometimes 4-5 times but all different hours. If it helps I can name a few of the trails I ride.

  10. #10
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    I'm in the Hudson valley Ny. new paltz area. I usually ride Illinois mountain, stewart forest state park, Taconic Hereford 909, Shaupeneak Ridge Trail.

  11. #11
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    I haven't ridden either bike park OP mentioned but I know they held a World Cup at Windham so surely the Ripmo isn't overkill there.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iliketacos View Post
    Hey ya'll so here's some info about me. I'm in my late 30's 5"8 200 lbs ... I currently own 2018 rockhopper 29er base large. I call it the "taint buster"....My local trails that I ride consists of average to steep climbs and some fast technical descents, there are a good amount of roots and rocks and my taint just can't handle another hardtail and yes I've got padded shorts. .... My price point max is 3200
    Ok couple points.

    Firstly. The large rock hopper probably is too big. I am 5'7" and ride mediums in most bikes. But your body proportions also play a rode. Larger bikes tend to be more stable which can be good, but also less nimble which can be bad.

    Second. your "taint buster" comment is down to lack of technique. You are simply sitting too much for the HT. Standing more helps reduce pressure and impact. I ride a singlespeed HT as well as 2 FS bikes and have thousands of miles on HT bikes over rocky terrain. They do take more work to ride in some places, but feeling pain in that area is due to sitting too much. I did move my from a HT on my long distance bike to a FS but only as my speeds increased and I was no longer able to rest on descents as much as I needed to. On 45 mile 4-5 hour ride being able to rest a bit more on rocky descent enables better climbing later in the race. I am almost as fast on many DH sections on my current HT singlespeed as on my XC FS, but it just takes more effort on HT. Not pain just effort.

    Third. The more plush and "comfortable" a bike generally the worse it will climb. The better a bike is for DH terrain the worse it is for climbing and flats. Of my 3 bikes each is different. My Singlespeed HT is just fun. I love it on shorter rides (3hrs or less) and it great on flater trails or climbing/descending trails. Rocky or smooth. It not as plush as either of my FS bikes, but is just fun. I have 100/100 XC FS bike too. That is pure speed and pretty light at under 23lbs. It my fastest bike on flats and most climbs (but some places my fastest climbing times on my Steel SS which is the same weight or slightly heavier). On downhills it is pretty fast and with short dropper post is pretty capable in 90% of the places I ride. I also have an Trail/Enduro bike. 160mm front/145 rear travel. 30lbs, but climbs well for a 30lbs bike. I really needs steep and rocky terrain to shine otherwise is just "ok". It can get by on smooth trails, but is just overkill and I would rather have my XC bike unless I plan to go slower with a group. I consider it "training" to ride my 30lbs bike instead of my 23lb one so I am not "too fast" for my group. However put in some real gnar and chunk and wow it is great. Plus it is ideal for climbing nasty techy stuff and bombing back down. I pretty much never do shuttles or bike parks so I have to climb up to the top for any killer descent.

    I tend to find most newer riders think they need a big bike for lots of terrain they "plan to ride" and end up with 30-35lbs Enduro sled that is way cool, but on crushed granite bike path and pretty smooth "Green" trails they put most of the their miles on. Then they complain about how hard climbing a 5% smooth grade for 1 mile is. For riders like that they would be alot better served on short travel 29er which is lighter and more snappy. Save the big bikes for the big gnar.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  13. #13
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    Ok. You like to ride fast over roots, rocks plus you want to hit the bike park. It sounds to be me your a more descent orientated person.

    Look for 150/160mm travel front and rear, 65 deg head angle. Go as light as you can afford.

    Have a look at a trek remedy. They are a real good bike for a good price.

  14. #14
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    I want to thank all of you folks for the great input, joe Paz your input has shed light on the path I want to go. I originally was going to build a trail ht which was going to be a Canfield bros epo carbon 29er with 130-140mm front travel, sram eagle groupset with gx cassette, rock shox pike rct 3 shock, sram guide brakes, tubeless wheel setup, dropper post, and comfortable cockpit. I like the idea of havin FS bike not because I want a super plush ride that will absorb a lot of rocks and bumps but something I can be out for a full day of riding and trying out a bike park occasionally.One of the reasons I call my current rockhopper the taint buster is due to the bike being a large and big on me when I go to put a foot down or try to stop before I crash, the top tube smacks my taint it's such and awkward top tube and also lack of technique lol. I'm still learning a lot and am truly grateful of all the input.

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    Another recently announced bike that may work well is the Nukeproof Reactor. It has a decent build right below your price point, comes with 27.5 or 29in wheels depending on your preference, and falls a bit more onto the "trail bike" side of the spectrum than the Ripmo AF, which is edging toward enduro.

    if i were you, I'd be aiming for a 120-130 bike unless you think you'll see a lot of park days. Modern bikes in that range will handle a lot of terrain while still pedaling well (though obviously they're not as burly as 150+ bikes or as fast on the pedals as 100mm XC bikes).

  16. #16
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    ^^^ agree on 120-130 for rocky rooty slippery east cost riding.
    Do the math.

  17. #17
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    So many bikes, and many different riding styles. Which would suit me?

    I am in your general neck of the woods and think I have an idea of the terrain you are talking about.

    Rocky, rooty, lots of up and down, but not a lot of 1000í climbs followed by 1000í decsents. Also, more old school trails less modern flow trail. Am I close?

    If so, I find something around 140mm to be the sweet spot for me. Bigger wheels are nice, too.

    It might come up a little short at the bike park, though. But honestly, something that doesnít is not what I want to be riding the rest of the time in what I think are your conditions. That said, I have taken 140mm bikes to lift serve parks and had a good time, but I was under-gunned.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    Check out the Giant Trance or Trance 29. Lots of trim levels on those, you can stay in your budget, break it a little, break it a lot. Honestly, you can get a carbon frame with components that will get you on the trail and keep you there for a while for $150 over your "max" (this is the sort of thing that makes us all go for that little bit more? I'll find the money somewhere....) and they are very capable bikes. Because the rear travel is not long, it pedals well, but the geometry is such that the bike deals with aggressive descending way better than you'd think for how short the rear travel is. Also, if you LBS put you on a large at 5'8" you might not want to take their word for sizing on the next bike.
    Agree on this.

    Also, you might be spreading things out too much. Where it seems your skill level may be and then looking for an "enduro-type" bike to handle parks - might be a mismatch.

    Get a confidence inspiring, yet snappy bike like the Trance and you'll love it on most any trail you have to pedal.

    These shorter/modest travel, slack 29er trail bikes are a great one bike answer for many riders. With the right tires they can cover such a range of riding.


    If you want to go to a bike park, rent. IMO its a big mistake to try and buy a trail bike that will also handle park duties. Not only will it do neither well, you'll beat the bike up at the park.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Second. your "taint buster" comment is down to lack of technique. You are simply sitting too much for the HT.
    This ^^^. Even on a FS bike you can't sit and slam into rough terrain and have a good time. Even when you are sitting on the saddle it should be lightly with a lot of the weight still on your feet. Once things get rough drop your saddle and stand up.
    Safe riding,

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  20. #20
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    120mm 29er is a sweet-spot for 29ers and all-around riding...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Agree on this.

    Also, you might be spreading things out too much. Where it seems your skill level may be and then looking for an "enduro-type" bike to handle parks - might be a mismatch.

    Get a confidence inspiring, yet snappy bike like the Trance and you'll love it on most any trail you have to pedal.

    These shorter/modest travel, slack 29er trail bikes are a great one bike answer for many riders. With the right tires they can cover such a range of riding.


    If you want to go to a bike park, rent. IMO its a big mistake to try and buy a trail bike that will also handle park duties. Not only will it do neither well, you'll beat the bike up at the park.
    This is exactly what I was going to say. Buying a bike for a few potential park days is a mistake, especially if you arenít at a level where you are going to be comfortable hitting the gnarly stuff in the park. The mid travel trail bikes are the best option for a one and done bike. They can definitely handle the more mellow/flowy stuff in the park too.

    Maybe a used santa cruz hightower, a spec stump jumper, trek fuel ex.

    If I was you I would get this.
    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...-8-29/p/23593/



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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Not only will it do neither well, you'll beat the bike up at the park.
    And you fight the bike down any kind of bumpy/steep trail holding on for dear life, rather than being able to enjoy the trail...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  23. #23
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    It depends on what trails you take at the bike park. Unless you're smashing down double black trails...a mid travel bike should be just fine.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iliketacos View Post
    My local trails that I ride consists of average to steep climbs and some fast technical descents, there are a good amount of roots and rocks and my taint just can't handle another hardtail and yes I've got padded shorts.
    This has already been brought up a couple times, but i'm doing it again cuz i'm bored.

    If you're having taint problems it's because of a horrible lack of fitness, or a lack of riding skill. We don't know you, don't know which one it is. If you're like me, i was a 23 year old clumsy fat sack of shit when i started mtb-ing seriously, and it took a solid year of riding/weightlifting A LOT before all my problems weren't due to my lack of fitness. No hate intended! I didn't recognize it in myself at the time.

    Otherwise... bikes are awesome these days, and 3200 should get you something excellent if you prioritize sales and don't pay the 1k carbon frame tax. I wouldn't sweat the details too much once you're looking at forum advice. Lots of good advice in this thread.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    It depends on what trails you take at the bike park. Unless you're smashing down double black trails...a mid travel bike should be just fine.
    I disagree. Most people underestimate how fast you gather speed and how rough it becomes, even on the easier trails. There are often fewer grade reversals because the mountain doesn't have all the real-estate in the world to string out the trails, so a "blue" in the park ends up being a lot different, relying heavily on braking, meaning your brakes must be able to deal with the heat and constant use. All the secondary effects from being able to gather speed so fast without all the grade reversals (g-outs, rough trails, etc.). This stuff tears up normal bikes and puts significant wear even on DH bikes, but they are at least built to handle it. I just sliced a rear tire and put 3x rock punctures in the front two days ago at the park, running 950/850g tires, that's my fault for not running DH-weight casings, but it just shows that the lighter weight stuff is ill-suited to it. If you are going to ride the park, I recommend minimum 6" travel front and rear, DH tires, full armor and full-face, and preferably coil front and rear shocks. If you aren't going that route and won't be riding the park a few times every month and lots of other gravity-orientated trails in-between, then get a bike better suited to what you actually intend to do and rent a bike when you go to the park. This is why I don't own a DH bike anymore, I just don't do that kind of riding enough to make it worth it. The 160 bike can be used on longer rides and I love gravity stuff. If I could only have one bike though, it'd probably be a 120mm 29er, because that's where the greatest versatility is IME, I'd rent at the park, but for all other riding it would do decent.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    ^^^ agree on 120-130 for rocky rooty slippery east cost riding.


    Thanks to everyone for all the great input. This thread has been so helpful. So when you guys say 120-130 of travel for my east coast rocky roots terrain, is that for the amount of rear travel? Or for the front suspension? If I do stick to 29er's would 140 rear/ 150 front be to much? I've been trying to scope out some sales and deals, are there sites that do Black Friday deals, I know I missed a few deals already but I still got time and trying to stack $$$$. I found a brand new 2019 Santa Cruz Lt carbon C R. For cheap it's 150mm rear and front travel. Would that be too much travel for what I'm looking to do? I'm realizing that if I do park days I might have to just rent a park bike for that purpose. I'm still new to trail riding and you guys have been awesome thanks again.

  27. #27
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    I would say that may be a little much, but it will probably be fine. It may be a bit worse at pedaling, but it can also be ridden in the park without issue. I know plenty of guys who I race against who ride a hightower lt.


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  28. #28
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    Seeing how new this whole deal is to you, I highly recommend you demo some bikes of different travel.
    Don't buy a bike regardless of brand, travel, or on-sale price, regardless what the shop tells you about it without trying it out on your intended terrain first.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xlr8n View Post
    Seeing how new this whole deal is to you, I highly recommend you demo some bikes of different travel.
    Don't buy a bike regardless of brand, travel, or on-sale price, regardless what the shop tells you about it without trying it out on your intended terrain first.
    Xlr8n you are 100% right I should try different bikes. Unfortunately it's been tough for me due to my work hours, i miss out out on a lot of group rides too. I missed a few demos like pivot/ yt industries in my area cause of my work schedule.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I disagree. Most people underestimate how fast you gather speed and how rough it becomes, even on the easier trails. There are often fewer grade reversals because the mountain doesn't have all the real-estate in the world to string out the trails, so a "blue" in the park ends up being a lot different, relying heavily on braking, meaning your brakes must be able to deal with the heat and constant use. All the secondary effects from being able to gather speed so fast without all the grade reversals (g-outs, rough trails, etc.). This stuff tears up normal bikes and puts significant wear even on DH bikes, but they are at least built to handle it. I just sliced a rear tire and put 3x rock punctures in the front two days ago at the park, running 950/850g tires, that's my fault for not running DH-weight casings, but it just shows that the lighter weight stuff is ill-suited to it. If you are going to ride the park, I recommend minimum 6" travel front and rear, DH tires, full armor and full-face, and preferably coil front and rear shocks. If you aren't going that route and won't be riding the park a few times every month and lots of other gravity-orientated trails in-between, then get a bike better suited to what you actually intend to do and rent a bike when you go to the park. This is why I don't own a DH bike anymore, I just don't do that kind of riding enough to make it worth it. The 160 bike can be used on longer rides and I love gravity stuff. If I could only have one bike though, it'd probably be a 120mm 29er, because that's where the greatest versatility is IME, I'd rent at the park, but for all other riding it would do decent.
    I think you might be overthinking it a bit. My GF rode the Mammoth bike park with me last week on a 135mm Stumpjumper 6F. She stayed on the blue trails and did a couple black trails too. When it comes to travel...it sometimes comes down how fast you're going. She basically just watched her speed coming down the trail. I rode the trails with a 140mm bike. There are people riding hardtails to full blown DH bikes.


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    For the cost conscious you might wish to look at some of the direct sales brands like Canyon, Intense etc etc. In some cases you end up with a whole lot of bike for a pretty good price.

  32. #32
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    Whatever you do, DO NOT buy online with your current knowledge/lack of knowledge or you could easily end up in the same situation youíre in now... with a bike that doesnít fit or doesnít suit you well. It took a long time before I could buy a bike sight unseen, knowing it would fit me. But this really is bad advice for someone in your situation.

    The best thing you can do is take a few shopping trips to find a shop with multiple brands that also has multiple bikes you might be interested in buying. You can pay a demo fee and ride multiple bikes to see what works for you. Your demo fee should go towards the purchase.

    I would never drop $3200 on a brand new bike without a test ride.

  33. #33
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    This may be a little late, I don't know. Lot's of great advice from everyone. Here is mine. Go to a LBS. Get fitted proper for a Stump Jumper or Trance. Short travel or regular flavor. Buy one and be done with it. You now have a solid, capable bike that will be great for 99% of your riding and skill building. A solid foundation. You will have LBS support for warranty work and build a relationship with them(if they are a good shop). Yes, you can ride bike park with a trail bike. I do just that, no problems. I agree, that renting a dh bike is the way to go if it's not an everyday thing for you. I know there are tons on bikes out there and the list is endless, that's why I recommended what i did. Tons of people get in to this sport and get better on good old SJ's and Trance's. Get better, ride the shit out of it, than next bike, you may know more of what you want and get something different. Dont get bogged down in the component race yet. To be honest, the lower end stuff is really good and will last longer anyway. Good luck, have fun, and let us know what you get.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by wideawakejake View Post
    This may be a little late, I don't know. Lot's of great advice from everyone. Here is mine. Go to a LBS. Get fitted proper for a Stump Jumper or Trance. Short travel or regular flavor. Buy one and be done with it. You now have a solid, capable bike that will be great for 99% of your riding and skill building. A solid foundation. You will have LBS support for warranty work and build a relationship with them(if they are a good shop). Yes, you can ride bike park with a trail bike. I do just that, no problems. I agree, that renting a dh bike is the way to go if it's not an everyday thing for you. I know there are tons on bikes out there and the list is endless, that's why I recommended what i did. Tons of people get in to this sport and get better on good old SJ's and Trance's. Get better, ride the shit out of it, than next bike, you may know more of what you want and get something different. Dont get bogged down in the component race yet. To be honest, the lower end stuff is really good and will last longer anyway. Good luck, have fun, and let us know what you get.
    Thanks for this input Jake. I am in the same boat as the OP, and I have a Giant and Jamis dealer in town, and a Specialized and Trek dealer a few towns over. The biggest problem I am having is none of the dealers have a Trance, Stumpjumper, or Remedy as a size medium in stock. I believe I could have them order any of these bikes and I will be very happy with the results, but your post just reemphasized my gut feeling of going with the Trance 2 or Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 27.5.

  35. #35
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    Yeah, they are just well made, capable bikes at a decent price. Like the Honda's of the mtb world, and I mean that in a really good way. Whatever you get, ride it and abuse it. Two US based direct sales that seem to be killing it are Diamondback and Fazzarri. Might be worth looking in to.

  36. #36
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    I'd talk to the manager of the bike shop that thought sizing a 5'8" guy on a large was a good idea (NOT).

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    Hey y'all I appreciate everyone's input it has been an eye opener, everyone has given me some great advice. I narrowed down what I'm looking for, and have been able to try a few bikes. so here's an update of everything going on. I rode a 2019 trek fuel 8 in med, 2019 stumpjumper comp alloy med, and 2019 Santa Cruz 5010 aluminum R large. They are all great bikes, excellent peddling, great feel of responsiveness and they all had good components the trek had sram gx groupset the other 2 had nx groupset. Again the LBS suggested that on the Santa Cruz I am a large, due to the fact it runs small and I'm on the border between a med and a large, they did not have a med In stock that I could test ride, but that large felt great it felt much better that the other 2 mediums I tried actually, but at the same time this was the same place where I was put on a large rockhopper which is too big on me. Now I feel like I'm having deja vu.

  38. #38
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    Honestly with how stupid long bikes are getting you would be better off on a small than a large now.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by noose View Post
    Honestly with how stupid long bikes are getting you would be better off on a small than a large now.
    Ha, agreed. The 5010 in large has nearly 24.5 ETT - maybe a little shorter with a bit lower saddle. Does it really benefit a trail bike to run a 35mm stem?

  40. #40
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    can anyone who normally rides med size frames confirm that they fit comfortably in a large santa cruz due to their geometry. I really enjoyed the santa cruz 5010 but they didn't have a med to try out, and large fit well I wasn't over extended it was nice. The only thing is I don't know how I feel about switching to 27.5 wheels from 29er

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iliketacos View Post
    can anyone who normally rides med size frames confirm that they fit comfortably in a large santa cruz due to their geometry. I really enjoyed the santa cruz 5010 but they didn't have a med to try out, and large fit well I wasn't over extended it was nice. The only thing is I don't know how I feel about switching to 27.5 wheels from 29er
    Go to the Santa Cruz forum and ask in the 5910 thread. You could also find another shop to demo a Med or ask your shop to get a demo in. Theyíre not cheap bikes so itís not being unreasonable to make the request. My local shop would go out if their way to accommodate this type of request.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnigro View Post
    Go to the Santa Cruz forum and ask in the 5910 thread. You could also find another shop to demo a Med or ask your shop to get a demo in. Theyíre not cheap bikes so itís not being unreasonable to make the request. My local shop would go out if their way to accommodate this type of request.
    Thank you for your response I posted it in the 5010 forum. The Lbs is looking for med 5010 to try out. I might have to try another bike shop. Your right those bikes aren't cheap and that would be the second bike I buy from them If i stick with them. Mnigro thanks again

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    Yep! Just to be clear, wasnít meaning to be condescending by pointing out the obvious... just making sure you werenít backing away from asking the LBS to do whatís right.

    Itís always easier for them to sell you what they have in stock. Thereís also some ppl who are always advising riders to size up and just run a shorter stem. Thatís not great advice for everyone.

  44. #44
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    No offense taken, I respect your reply. After I got the lg rockhopper. I don't want to go through the same ordeal with my next bike. I explained that to them too. I appreciate your help. I don't want to go spending more money on parts that I shouldn't need when I first purchase a bike.

  45. #45
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    Maybe late again but I am 5'8 210lbs and had a medium 5010v3 cR Size wise it was spot on. Never thought I needed a large frame with any Santa Cruz bike. Or any other bike brand for that matter. And yeah, let your LBS work for you. Customer service is all that keeps them open. If you cant find a good shop to get you the right bike, might as well get a direct sales brand.

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