Pros and Cons of a bashguard.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Pros and Cons of a bashguard.

    Please excuse me if this question has been asked many times before but I searched and couldn't find a full explanation.
    I see many of your build ups include a bashguard and also terms like 1x10 or 2x9, now I understand you are reffering to how many front rings you have, but why would you want to give up gears are the weight savings that great?

  2. #2
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    It is a combination of weight savings, and trimming the unnecessary parts. I personally have never used 24 (3x8) speeds during a ride. I hardly ever leave my middle ring so having three is a waste. Less weight because you are trimming 2 cogs (1x9/10) and a shifter and cable/housing.
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  3. #3
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    Not really about weight saving. Sometimes you actually add weight with bashguards.

    It about increasing ground clearance and the ability to safely pivot a bike over a tree log or rock on the guard. Most mountain bikes don't need such a big front sprocket since we never pedal in BIG/SMALL. I ride very tight technical trails so for many years I've been running 2x9 (and soon maybe 1x10). I spend 98% of the time in the middle ring.

  4. #4
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    its only a little bit about weight since all you save is the front der and shifter weight

    what you really meant to ask about was a chainguide. it stops you from dropping your chain. some chainguides have bash guards to protect the ring and some dont. a chainguide is used on 1x9 and there are other similar but not quite as effective designs for 2.9

    if you dont hit your rings on rocks and drop your chain a lot then you dont need any of it...especially if you frequently make use of your various front rings

  5. #5
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    It's also about looks and sounds, to me a front derailleur just looks ugly especially with all the cluttered cabling, and a top and bottom chain guide looks like it means business, plus a front derailleur makes annoying tinkle tinkle sounds from the chain when you go over bumps, I've been riding for years and I've just become intolerant to dropping the chain.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaveOn View Post
    It about increasing ground clearance and the ability to safely pivot a bike over a tree log or rock on the guard.
    This, at least in my case. I basically gave up something I never used in exchange for more ground clearance. Weight wasn't a consideration and frankly the difference is too small for me to notice. I put the ratios in an online gear calculator and found that only the top three cogs in the big ring were really unique - everything else overlapped with the middle ring. Since I don't ride my MTB on the road and don't have any big downhills, in practice I never used them. My home trail has a number of logs to clear, the bashguard gives me an extra inch of ground clearance and if it does hit, it's smooth edge slides across rather than digging in.

    (Kept my granny gear though, rather than going to a 1x9. Too much deep sand around here to give that up.)

  7. #7
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    I got mine (bashguard, not chain guide) for extra ground clearance because I was hitting on logs and rocks a lot. Wish the bash guard you can bump obstacles without worrying about breaking something. It also allows me to ride with jeans on without getting caught in the chainring when I'm messing around near my house. I never (or rarely) used my big ring so it was a no brainer. It also does look better IMO. I can't give up my granny gear though because there are some steep climbs around here. I wish I could because I'd love to go 1x9 because I really hate front deraileurs!

  8. #8
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    Biggest pros of bashguard and going 1xwhatever or 2xwhatever is the chain guide. On my 3x setup, I was dropping a chain a few times a ride in the rough sections. On my 2x, the guide keeps it nice and tight. Also quiet. More clearance and not worrying about bending the teeth on a rock or a log are added benefits.

    For me, the only time I was ever cranking on the big ring on my old 3x mtb was on a dirt road or something like that. Never needed or used it on the trails. I haven't missed it yet.
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  9. #9
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    Pros: It keeps you legs from getting chewed up in a crash.
    Cons: You like the scars from your legs getting chewed up in a crash.

  10. #10
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    Most people I know run one mainly for clearance across logs and because it's the "MTB thing to do".

    I don't want one because I use the living Hell out of my big chainring.

  11. #11
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    Thank you all, makes a lot more sense now

  12. #12
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    for me, 22-36-bash in front works wonders. my rides are 50% uphill, 50%downhill. 22t for "climbing mode" (some pretty decent climbs here, and bike's heavy), 36t for "bombing mode". Bash for ground clearance and safety.

    Last weekend I rode climbed 1560 ft in 7 miles, some very steep sections so I can't live without a granny gear.

  13. #13
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    Adding a bash guard was one of the best low cost upgrades I ever did. Never miss the big ring. Bash guards just look so cool an a AM bike, 3 rings are so cross country.

  14. #14
    sofa king awsm
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    3 rings look like a sack of ****.
    Hot lunch is cooking in my saddlebag.

  15. #15
    try anything on a bike
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    bash gaurd is best upgrade i did on my old Trance...new bike will have it done immediately.

  16. #16
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    Changeover in progress as we speak.

  17. #17
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    One

  18. #18
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    i got my bashguard because the front der is a pain in the ass to adjust. I had to replace my entire drivetrain on the used bike that i bought last year. a 44 tooth ring costs more than an average 36t bashguard. I got my bashguard for $10 or $15. I replaced my 2 other rings with 24 and 34. I have never even shifted down to the 24 while on a trail. I will probably buy a 36t for the middle sometime this year.

  19. #19
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    Going to a 2x9 with a bashguard made a noticeable difference on at least one of my regular rides. I can now take lines that I couldn't before. The extra ground clearance may not seem like a big deal, but for me at least it really was. If you regularly ride tight sections with lots of drop offs, boulders, and chunk the the extra ground clearance (and comfort knowing that if you do hit it'll only be the guard) allows one to experiment with a variety of lines that were "off limits" before.
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  20. #20
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    I haven't been mountain biking for to long but I've been linking the 3rd chain wheel a lot for downhills. The slower petal rotation seems to keep me a little more relaxed at the higher speeds so I end up being smoother and in more control. Its a pretty small reason that I'll get over with more experience but I'm keeping it for now.

  21. #21
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    Sometimes you actually add weight with bashguards.

  22. #22
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    bash guards are good. thankyou.

  23. #23
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    I run 2x9, my bashguard is so much heavier than largest cog. Main reason is for ground clearance.

  24. #24
    SamIAm
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    pro: everything
    con: you have to put it on
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ls1geezer View Post
    Please excuse me if this question has been asked many times before but I searched and couldn't find a full explanation.
    I see many of your build ups include a bashguard and also terms like 1x10 or 2x9, now I understand you are reffering to how many front rings you have, but why would you want to give up gears are the weight savings that great?
    even though this is an old thread, i want to chime in since i just did this.

    getting rid of the third ring completely fixed my chain suck issue. i also like only having a double because my shifters do not display what gear I am in, and it makes it simple. i don't like cross chaining and i was getting sick of looking down at my gears to know where i was. i used a calculator and it seems that by getting rid of the third ring i am only losing 2 gears. i never used the two hardest gears on the third ring anyway. next, sometimes i like riding with long pants for fun, and getting rid of the third ring means my pants no longer get caught in the cog. this was one of the best things i've done to my bike. i only had it done though because it fixed my chain suck.

  26. #26
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    Well, for me it will be the fact the my legs will not be injured by the serrated big ring. It also allows me to run a medium cage derailleur that sharpens up shifting. I've also got a black and gold theme going on my bike and the E13 turbocharger is black and gold

    Cheers

  27. #27
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    If you keep a triple ring you'll look like an XC geek.
    If you look like an XC geek you'll ride like an XC geek.
    If you ride like an XC geek you'll try to roll off drops at Post Canyon and catch your big ring.
    If you catch your big ring you'll go OTB and break your wrists
    If you go OTB and break your wrists you'll whine like a girl and try to get local authorities in Hood River involved.
    If you get local authorities involved IMBA will come out and remove the trail feature.
    If you get the trail feature removed, WE will hunt your sorry ass down and KICK YOUR ASS!

    SO... DO NOT GET YOUR ASS KICKED - GET A BASH GUARD IF YOU PLAN TO RIDE THESE TYPES OF TRAILS! (and yes, there might be some truth to this story, lol)

    Have FUN!

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    Last edited by Gman086; 04-08-2012 at 01:21 PM.
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  28. #28
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    I like the big chain ring. After a ride going home on the street, I'm able to go faster than with a middle chain ring.

    1) cooks, janitors, illegal aliens, children, old men collecting aluminum cans, old ladies with 700c wheel comfort bikes, etc or annoying hipsters on single speeds dust you on the street, also my ex-neighbor who was on crack and totally destroyed his family by bankrupting them now rides a 700c wheeled bike instead of a car because he lost his license too and the cars..goes faster than a 2 ringed mtn bike.
    2) the thought of a 26" Maxxis 2.35-2.5 tire and a 32t ring=slow


    If you live too far from a trail head and use a car to get there, than 2 rings are OK

  29. #29
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    Hah GMAN, will do

  30. #30
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    I don't need a big chainring since I usually work on catwalking everywhere I go around town.


    2x9 is way better than 3x9

  31. #31
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    I love the BG for two reasons. 1) smoother on the legs when stuff gets sticky, 2) smoother on the logs when you just can't get high enough

  32. #32
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    Never really used the big chainring, but it does come in handy on the road (if you're riding to and from the trailhead).

  33. #33
    allmountainventure
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    Ever seen a chainring slice? Ow!

    A plastic bash slides over rocks nicely where as a chainring or metal bash catches a bit, sounds awful and also gouges the rock out.

    Ive always had a 2 x 9 with the larger chainring being 36T.

    My new steed is a 3 x 10. Soon to be a 2 x 10 with a bash ring. Not sure what chainring T ratios yet.

  34. #34
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    Pro bashguard

    I love my 1 x 10 set-up on my '09 RM Slayer SXC 50. Sometimes the climbs can be a little brutal, but having the protection is worth the pain. I think more than anything I miss my large chainring, as I sometimes max out the current setup.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by allmountainventure View Post
    Ever seen a chainring slice? Ow!
    My brother didn't listen to me when I told him to get a bashguard. This is what he did with his big ring. Your choice.
    Notice he's also riding in running shoes in this pic. I finally convinced him to get 5.10s too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Pros and Cons of a bashguard.-brotherbigring.jpg  

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  36. #36
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    Depends where you live, if you are in central Saskatchewan (or somewhere else flat and treeless with no obstacles) a bg. doesn't really matter, if you are riding somewhere with logs and especially rocks they are a neccesity for the extra clearance.

  37. #37
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    One chainring to the calf and I never rode with a big ring again.

  38. #38
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    great info. now i'm more convinced to get a bash guard/chain guide since my big ring is useless with my broken shifter. anyone recommend a good one? still yet to find out what my current big ring is and the slots measurements...

  39. #39
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    I like BBG for guard only.

    I am planning on trying an MRP for chainguide/bash

  40. #40
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    sorry for the poor pic, but it shows why I prefer to ride with a bash..



  41. #41
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    looks like a sweet ride! have the same FD. does that BG also serve/have as a chain guide?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by accutrax View Post
    sorry for the poor pic, but it shows why I prefer to ride with a bash..
    You should really lower your front derailleur to where there is less than a penny's height between the teeth and the cage. The crisp shifting from a tight front derailleur is half the benefit of a double ring setup.

    I love bashguards on the bikes that have them, no chainring tattoo, more ground clearance, about the same weight. I kinda like the 42T on the front of my 29er but have never used it on the trail, only when out pub crawling.

    This thread is making me want to throw a bashguard onto my 29er since it's the only geared bike without one other than my roadie.

  43. #43
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    hmm.... i hadn't really considered switching from 3x10 to 2x10 but you guys make a lot of good arguments.

    i do use my top gears sometimes when riding around my neighbohood to work on the cardio, but i guess it's not critical. i hit a lot of logs with the big ring on trails and it's annoying as hell.

    what else is involved besides just swapping a BG in place of the large chainring? you required to change the front derailer and shifter? else i imagine the first time i forget i only have 2 rings i'll shift up and send the chain into the nether regions? or does a 'chain guide' take care of that? i'm not totally clear what that is exactly... i thought it was for 1x setups only?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowpolyjoe View Post
    hmm.... i hadn't really considered switching from 3x10 to 2x10 but you guys make a lot of good arguments.

    i do use my top gears sometimes when riding around my neighbohood to work on the cardio, but i guess it's not critical. i hit a lot of logs with the big ring on trails and it's annoying as hell.

    what else is involved besides just swapping a BG in place of the large chainring? you required to change the front derailer and shifter? else i imagine the first time i forget i only have 2 rings i'll shift up and send the chain into the nether regions? or does a 'chain guide' take care of that? i'm not totally clear what that is exactly... i thought it was for 1x setups only?
    Nope, put the bash on and adjust the high limit screw on the front deraileur so that it stops at the middle ring. Good to ride May want to take a few links out of your chain though.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    You should really lower your front derailleur to where there is less than a penny's height between the teeth and the cage. The crisp shifting from a tight front derailleur is half the benefit of a double ring setup.
    .
    yep..thanks!! its already done...
    tried before a 36/24 setup, but found it not useful for my needs and returned back to 32/22 as shown on the pic...

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by db_8 View Post
    looks like a sweet ride! have the same FD. does that BG also serve/have as a chain guide?
    never had problems with the chain , the combination of the old FD, the bashguard and running a chain which is a bit too short works fine...

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by abeckstead View Post
    Nope, put the bash on and adjust the high limit screw on the front deraileur so that it stops at the middle ring. Good to ride May want to take a few links out of your chain though.
    thanks for the info.

    what does that do to your shifting? i assuming "small" on the shifter still equals the small chainring - but what about "medium" and "large" on the shifter? are they both mapped to the medium chainring after that tweak? or do you have to shift all the way up to "large" on the shifter to get to the 'high limit' to engage the middle sized chainring?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowpolyjoe View Post
    thanks for the info.

    what does that do to your shifting? i assuming "small" on the shifter still equals the small chainring - but what about "medium" and "large" on the shifter? are they both mapped to the medium chainring after that tweak? or do you have to shift all the way up to "large" on the shifter to get to the 'high limit' to engage the middle sized chainring?
    You shouldn't be able to go above "medium" because "large" is blocked.

  49. #49
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    This is why I now run a bash guard.

    Sent from my VS910 4G using Tapatalk 2
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Pros and Cons of a bashguard.-uploadfromtaptalk1347562005999.jpg  


  50. #50
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    ouch...

    anyway, thanks for the info accutrax!

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    You shouldn't be able to go above "medium" because "large" is blocked.
    ah, thanks. i haven't done much maintenance on my bike yet so i don't know exactly how everything works.

  52. #52
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    Ever since the large chainring went through my varicosities, bleeding did not stop and had to be clipped by a surgeon. This was in the late 80's--- I started using "rockring"

    Fast forward 20+years--- The large chainring has always been replaced by a bash to protect the legs as you can see from the others that posted.

  53. #53
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    I went 1x9 on my AM rig using e.13s LG-1:

    (not my bike, which is at the shop)


    It integrates chain retention and a "taco" bash guard into one light-weight unit. There is not much weight savings, but plenty of extra clearance and simplicity!

    I run a 36T chainring and am thinking about stepping it up to a 38T as I get stronger. The climbs around here are mostly short and steep so I can usually just mash up them fast and not burn out. It's amusing watching a lot of people from out-of-state gear-down for the climbs and try to crawl up them like they would a mountain-side. They usually fail and exert a lot more energy in the process doing it!
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  54. #54
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    More or less bash-related question... I'm thinking of going back to 2x10 (from 1x10) to able to pull off more proper climbing per ride than I can currently muster. I have a triple SLX crank which I will setup with 24-32-bash and a SLX 3x10 front shifter. My previous front mech is not the correct size clamp for my frame, so instead of messing with spacer I plan to simply buy a new one, and while I'm at it, why not get one dedicated for 2x10? XT M786 in particular has caught my eye.

    So, the question is; would that cause any problems with the mentioned setup, like the triple shifter or crank (different chainline from a dedicated 2x10 crank etc)? I'm thinking it should work out fine - that the shifter will work pretty much like it did when I used a 3x10 mech and got rid of the highest gear with the set screws, and that there should be enough adjustability to make the mech work with my crank and chainline without any hassle.

    A potential cause of issues though is that Shimano's 2x10 mechs are all rated for a big ring in the range of 38-44t, while the middle position of a 3x10 is more suited for the ring I will be running (on paper at least). What, if any, problems may this cause? Is it significant enough that I should consider running a 3x10 mech instead?


    (Just to get it out of the way: The reason I'm going with just 32t up front is because I've got a chainring + bash for that laying around and I won't have to buy a new chain. I also enjoy the extra ground clearance and I very rarely spin out with my current 1x10 setup running a 32t anyway.)
    Last edited by svalgis; 09-17-2012 at 09:55 AM.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by svalgis View Post
    A potential cause of issues though is that Shimano's 2x10 mechs are all rated for a big ring in the range of 38-44t, while the middle position of a 3x10 is more suited for the ring I will be running (on paper at least). What, if any, problems may this cause? Is it significant enough that I should consider running a 3x10 mech instead?
    The bigger issue here is that the 2x10 front derailleurs are designed around 2x10 chainring spacing and chainline. You will need to use a triple front derailleur and triple shifter; if you lock out the big ring position you will only have the first two rings available.

    Make sure you set up your shifter for gears 1-2 and not gears 2-3 when running the double w/bash. Cable pull is not consistent across all three chainring shifts.

    IIRC Shimano made an SLX level 2x9 front derailleur with shaping specifically for 36T chainrings rather than normal triple FDs that are curved for 44T rings. This would work perfectly for 2x10 and even offer less rub in extreme gear combinations due to teh slightly wider cage.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    The bigger issue here is that the 2x10 front derailleurs are designed around 2x10 chainring spacing and chainline.
    Oh, so that is an actual issue after all? As you might have read I did quickly mention it as a possible problem, but tbh I didn't really think it would cause any headaches.

    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    You will need to use a triple front derailleur and triple shifter; if you lock out the big ring position you will only have the first two rings available.
    Thanks, I have run with that setup before so I know how it works. My idea was that the slightly smaller cage would suit my needs better which is why I'd prefer a "real" 2x10 mech. Oh well!

    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Make sure you set up your shifter for gears 1-2 and not gears 2-3 when running the double w/bash. Cable pull is not consistent across all three chainring shifts.
    Good call, thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    IIRC Shimano made an SLX level 2x9 front derailleur with shaping specifically for 36T chainrings rather than normal triple FDs that are curved for 44T rings. This would work perfectly for 2x10 and even offer less rub in extreme gear combinations due to teh slightly wider cage.
    Wouldn't I still be subjected to the chainline problem as with regular 2x10 front derailleurs though?

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by svalgis View Post
    Wouldn't I still be subjected to the chainline problem as with regular 2x10 front derailleurs though?
    Nope and therein lies the confusion between dedicated 2x10 setups and converted double setups.

    Here's the derailleur:
    Universal Cycles -- Shimano FD-M667 SLX Front Derailleur - 9 Speed

    With a 2x10 setup, you have a FD designed around a certain chainline and a shifter designed to move the derailleur only between that range. With a converted double setup (2 rings on a triple crank), you are running the same chainring spacing as a triple and must use a triple front derailleur as it will provide the proper range of motion across the chainrings.

  58. #58
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    Okay, so I get that part. And the difference is that that particular derailleur is made for converted triple cranks, is that right? That's the part that confused me.

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    To have a better clearance over the terrain and to not break the chainring when riding over fallen trees.

  60. #60
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    Bash guards slide over things better than teeth. the don't bend either. might break, but don't bend.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    ...With a converted double setup (2 rings on a triple crank), you are running the same chainring spacing as a triple and must use a triple front derailleur as it will provide the proper range of motion across the chainrings.
    The chainline on my SLX 2x cranks is the same as the chainline on three different sets of converted 3x to 2x cranks I've done. Also there's plenty of range on the 2x 9-speed front derailleur. I've used the SLX 2x front derailleur on both set-ups with excellent results.

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    edit: Stupidity removed, I think I get it now...

    I'll try the SLX 2x9 FD, thanks guys.
    Last edited by svalgis; 09-18-2012 at 12:37 PM.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by pursuiter View Post
    The chainline on my SLX 2x cranks is the same as the chainline on three different sets of converted 3x to 2x cranks I've done. Also there's plenty of range on the 2x 9-speed front derailleur. I've used the SLX 2x front derailleur on both set-ups with excellent results.
    Yep, that because traditionally the SLX 2x cranks were triples that came from the factory with 22/36/bash gearing. The new 2x10 SLX cranks are moving over to the modern mountain double chainring spacing.

    People who knew their gearing needs have been going 2x7, 2x8, and 2x9 over the years but now with the creation of larger range cassettes it is more feasable for most riders.

    Same thing happened in the road community years ago with the advent of 10speed drivetrains and compact double cranks replacing triples. 10speed cassettes allow for an additional low range gear OR tighter gear spacing at the same range and compact double cranks allow for tighter and more reliable chainring shifting.

  64. #64
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    Would REALLY appreciate any advice you can give me...I recently added a bashguard to my stock SHIMANO XT (24-32-42) crankset with a SHIMANO 10SPD cassette, and now it shifts like crap (3 bike shops have worked on it, none of them could really make it better....It really struggles to shift at the extreme ends of the gearing - second largest cassette cog to middle ring and granny to second from the smallest cassette cog). If I understand you all correctly , them would this derailleur you mention (SLX level 2x9 front derailleur) coupled with a new 36T chainring help??? If so, how does the 2x9 der. mech work with a 10 speed cassette? Thanks very much,

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    I think most riders would not use the small-small or large-large combo. Unless it is 1x9 or 1 x10 which you could align front ring for best chain line.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fruitatracker View Post
    Would REALLY appreciate any advice you can give me...I recently added a bashguard to my stock SHIMANO XT (24-32-42) crankset with a SHIMANO 10SPD cassette, and now it shifts like crap (3 bike shops have worked on it, none of them could really make it better....It really struggles to shift at the extreme ends of the gearing - second largest cassette cog to middle ring and granny to second from the smallest cassette cog). If I understand you all correctly , them would this derailleur you mention (SLX level 2x9 front derailleur) coupled with a new 36T chainring help??? If so, how does the 2x9 der. mech work with a 10 speed cassette? Thanks very much,
    What you're describing is extreme cross chaining. Did you shorten the chain a few links along with ditching the big ring? And did you lower the front derailleur closer to the 'new' big ring (32T)?

    The small-small combination will allow the derailleur to fold up on itself since there is not adequate tension to keep the cage extended. Conversely, the big-big combination forces the cage to overextend, making it hard to get the chain loose enough to jump to a bigger cog.

    Front derailleur height shouldnt make anything shift worse than before but front shifting can be improved by lowering the derailleur closer to the 32T ring. And no, a new front derailleur wont help your technique issue of cross chaining.

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    Thanks. Yes, big big or small small is extreme cross chaining for sure, but I would think you should be able to run second cog from the biggest with the middle ring and second cog from the smallest with the granny? I don't spend much if any time in these gears, but it frustrates me that these combos shifted GREAT before I went to the bashguard. I have shortened the chain, lowered the front derailleur, adjusted the front derailleur, etc. etc. (and so have the 3 shops I have taken it to), and it won't perform like it did before adding the bash...just makes no sense!

  68. #68
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    How many links did you remove when you shortened the chain? You should be able to shift along the full cassette in the big ring, but shouldnt do so in use.

    If you're having issues, you probably removed too many links and are risking a broken derailleur or hanger when cross-chaining.

    Look at the pics of the derailleur with too short of a chain:
    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Chain Length Sizing

    I only ride hardtails and use the big-big combo plus 1 link for most bikes since I never cross-chain. Most people conservatively size chains according to the big-big combo plus 2 links (3 in the case of some full-suspensions with chain growth).

  69. #69
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    I run a 1x8 11-28/32T set up with a 36t bash and it works great. Been running that for years.

  70. #70
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    I have a 3x10 with 22/33/44 up front. Considering replacing the 44 ring with a bashguard. I see Race Face bashguards available for 32, 36, & 40 tooth. Is that the size of the ring being replaced or the one remaining? They all appear to be 104 mm - how can that be? Also, what are BCD & offset?
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fruitatracker View Post
    Would REALLY appreciate any advice you can give me...I recently added a bashguard to my stock SHIMANO XT (24-32-42) crankset with a SHIMANO 10SPD cassette, and now it shifts like crap (3 bike shops have worked on it, none of them could really make it better....It really struggles to shift at the extreme ends of the gearing - second largest cassette cog to middle ring and granny to second from the smallest cassette cog). If I understand you all correctly , them would this derailleur you mention (SLX level 2x9 front derailleur) coupled with a new 36T chainring help??? If so, how does the 2x9 der. mech work with a 10 speed cassette? Thanks very much,
    You made some mistake on installation. The 32T chainring is still the "middle" ring w/ respect to chain line. There is no such thing as "cross-chaining" the middle ring, as another poster said. You should not have moved the FD at all. The FD doesn't 'know' that you have replaced the big ring w/ a bash. You want it to shift and to maintain the cage clearances that it had before. One thing you can do is screw the H limit screw really far in to keep from shifting out toward the bash, but that is not strictly necessary. Reducing the length of your chain to the minimum (wrap directly around the bigger ring in the front to the biggest cog in the back and add 2 links) is a good idea. Swapping down from a long cage RD to a medium cage (after you've decided 2x10 is for you) is a good idea. After this chain shortening, you may want to do a basic rear derailer tune (setting the L and H limits, making sure your cable pull is correct, adjusting the B-screw). Not to imply that simply taking your chain tool out of the box somehow moved these adjusters, but it sounds like someone did.

    But the bash guard itself is no way I can think of responsible for your rear shifting issues. If you had done nothing but remove the crankset, replace the big ring w/ a bash, bolt everything back together, the shifting would not have changed at all. And you absolutely should be able to shift through all 10 cogs from the middle ring w/ no problems once the rear is tuned properly.

    Speaking from experience w/ the e-thirteen DRS (a bash-middle-granny chain guide) set up on several different bikes. Not to mention both my current bikes are 1x9 running various guides each w/ generic triple crank parts.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snfoilhat View Post
    You made some mistake on installation. The 32T chainring is still the "middle" ring w/ respect to chain line. There is no such thing as "cross-chaining" the middle ring, as another poster said. You should not have moved the FD at all. The FD doesn't 'know' that you have replaced the big ring w/ a bash. You want it to shift and to maintain the cage clearances that it had before. One thing you can do is screw the H limit screw really far in to keep from shifting out toward the bash, but that is not strictly necessary. Reducing the length of your chain to the minimum (wrap directly around the bigger ring in the front to the biggest cog in the back and add 2 links) is a good idea. Swapping down from a long cage RD to a medium cage (after you've decided 2x10 is for you) is a good idea. After this chain shortening, you may want to do a basic rear derailer tune (setting the L and H limits, making sure your cable pull is correct, adjusting the B-screw). Not to imply that simply taking your chain tool out of the box somehow moved these adjusters, but it sounds like someone did.

    But the bash guard itself is no way I can think of responsible for your rear shifting issues. If you had done nothing but remove the crankset, replace the big ring w/ a bash, bolt everything back together, the shifting would not have changed at all. And you absolutely should be able to shift through all 10 cogs from the middle ring w/ no problems once the rear is tuned properly.

    Speaking from experience w/ the e-thirteen DRS (a bash-middle-granny chain guide) set up on several different bikes. Not to mention both my current bikes are 1x9 running various guides each w/ generic triple crank parts.
    Thanks, that is exactly what Shimano said as well!

  73. #73
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    hey guy , i need some help about bashguard , i have FSA Dyna Drive 44/32/22T.
    what kind size bashgurad that fit this crankset?

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by KennyGT View Post
    hey guy , i need some help about bashguard , i have FSA Dyna Drive 44/32/22T.
    what kind size bashgurad that fit this crankset?

    You've got a lot of options, but this is what I put on recently, and it's working very well.

    Race Face Atlas Bash Guard > Components > Drivetrain > Bashguards | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by KennyGT View Post
    hey guy , i need some help about bashguard , i have FSA Dyna Drive 44/32/22T.
    what kind size bashgurad that fit this crankset?
    I have the same crank and installed one of these:
    Products

    I replaced the 44t ring with the 104 BCD 34t 60gr bashguard. My existing chainring bolts were a perfect fit. You could keep the 44t ring and add a 44t bashguard, but then you would need longer bolts and it would weigh more.

    I haven't tried it yet, but a friend has been riding the same setup and likes it.
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  76. #76
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    Bash guards are mostly for all mountain and downhill bikes. They are usually paired with a chain guide, which keeps the chain on through rough terrain(roots, rocks, etc.). Guards are great for protecting the chainrings from impacts from logs or rocks. You usually don't need your outer chainring when your riding mostly downhill or flow trails.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackStephen View Post
    my rides are 50% uphill, 50%downhill.
    Me too! except for the occasional shuttle ;-)

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