one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 62 of 62
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620

    one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike

    Well i broke my scott ransom 10 frame again. Last year was the rocker arm this year the chain stay. the bike is a 2007 and has been road hard. the funny thing is the carbon has never broke, just the metal alloy. For the most part it has been a good bike but has had some issues. But i have loved the versatility from big backcountry rides like 7 summits in rossland. To 23,000 vert in one day at silver mt ski resort here in north idaho.

    But i keep wondering if i should get a 4 inch trail bike and a full on downhill bike. I only do the ski resort thing a couple of days a year. and the ride the frame broke on was a 12 mile fire road climb (2 1\2 hour climb) followed by a 7 mile single track ridge ride with a 3 mile single track downhill. I was 2\3 of the way thru the ridge ride section when the chainstay broke. So i do like the all mountain side of things. long grunt followed by trail than bomb's away. Most of my after work rides around here are a hour climb followed by a good dowhill.

    What do you think? 6 inch all mountain or 4 inch trail and a downhill bike?
    If if matters i am 6'1 210 and ride aggresively. I reside in north idaho with alot of rooty rocky, mountain terrain, not to many flowy, flat trails.


    thanks
    tim

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,569
    For your size and terrain get a Knolly Delerium and call it good!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  3. #3
    Huffy Rider
    Reputation: motochick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,394
    Firebird.

  4. #4
    Yes, that's fonetic
    Reputation: whoda*huck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,890
    If you can afford it, by all means go for two bikes. One 'in between' bike will do both, but not as well as two task specific bikes. Myself, I'd get a 5 or 6" (built lightish for a trail bike) and a DH bike. I don't think a 4" xc bike would be enough for me and the way I like to ride on the way down.

  5. #5
    Big Test Icycles
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,470
    I just got rid of two bikes (5" and 7") and replaced them with a Firebird. I was very surprised at the performance of the bird. It may not be a WC DH racer but I bet it will hold it's own during my next Whistler trip. My 7" bike was sitting more often than I liked so the Firebird fits the bill for more trail than shuttle days.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,123
    Quote Originally Posted by whodaphuck View Post
    If you can afford it, by all means go for two bikes. One 'in between' bike will do both, but not as well as two task specific bikes. Myself, I'd get a 5 or 6" (built lightish for a trail bike) and a DH bike. I don't think a 4" xc bike would be enough for me and the way I like to ride on the way down.
    I agree, I don't think most 4" bikes would fit what you like to do with your "every day" bike so get a 5-6" bike and a DH bike.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: socalMX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,275
    I was in the same boat as you somewhat and geuss what,my name is also Tim and im 6-2 210Lbs...Lol...I read many threads like this and reviews and finally ended up with a SC Nomad and I could not be happier,especially now since I ditched the air suspension and went coil.With XT components,Mavic tubeless and Fox RC4/Van 36 im just over 32Lbs,perfect for a bigger guy like me.This thing climbs excellent (dual ring front) and bombs down even better.The geo is spot on and cornering/jumping is a blast!Good luck in the search,who needs two bikes!!!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    397
    If you only do the dowhill thing a cuople times a year, then just rent a DH bike for that. IMHO, they are waaay too expensive to buy if you're not going to ride it very often.

    If you DID ride DH a lot, I would say get a Specialized Pitch and a Specialized Demo, or maybe a Kona Dawg and a Kona Operator or something like that.

    Otherwise buy a Cove G-spot.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manokaiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    163
    I'd go for Cannondale Jekyll

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Haus Boss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,494
    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    For your size and terrain get a Knolly Delerium and call it good!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Given your size, I think Gman is onto something. If you don't need all the travel you could just go w/ the 6" Chilcotin. I doubt you're gonna break a Knolly frame!

    I think you could consider some other beefier AM or FR bikes that can pedal like the like the Transition Bottlerocket, Cove Gspot, Trek Slash air, and Specialized SX Trail.


    The Firebird sounds like an awesome long travel trail bike- but there's a few stories out there of broken frames when people tried to ride them like Nomads : P

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hardtails Are Better's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    6,294
    If, for financial/ space/ marital harmony/ whatever reasons you're limited to 1 expensive bike or 2 kinda OK ones, I think you can build a pretty damn good do-it-all around something like a Delerium, an SX Trail, etc. If you can afford it though, multiple bikes is the way to go. I've got 5 mountain bikes at this point, and while that's a bit more than I "need", I'm glad I at least have a dedicated AM bike and a DH bike.

  12. #12
    biking is fun
    Reputation: climbingbubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,362
    I tried to go the one bike route last year (knolly delirium) and while it was fun I really missed having 2 bikes. The delirium was great at most things but when you started to get to the extremes (pure XC or nasty DH) I realized im a 2 bike guy.

    Now I have a slackened out blur lt2 and a Banshee legend mk2 and am completely happy with my decision.

    I will say though that I ride DH at least once a week and the guys I usually ride with all ride their DH bikes on every trail so that played a big role in my decision.

    If you go the one bike route then get something like the Nomad, Enduro, Firebird, Chilcotin, Rune, or any other of the 6" travel bikes that are popular right now. They will handle the uphill good and the DH pretty good too.

  13. #13
    Professional Slacker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,870
    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss View Post
    The Firebird sounds like an awesome long travel trail bike- but there's a few stories out there of broken frames when people tried to ride them like Nomads : P
    A Nomad is not burlier than a Firebird.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,666
    Considering your weight, I would go with something a bit heavier than your typical 6" AM fame as a one and only bike. I love my Nomad but I think you'll kill it @ your weight unless you also own a DH bike. Most 7" (frames around 8lbs) with a 180 fork should fit the bill nicely.At your weight, I would think you're asking for trouble if you buy a 6 to 7lbs AM frame and pound it like a DH bike. Here's a few bikes I like that I think would work for a big guy as a one bike: Bullit, VP Free, Morewood Shova LT, Banshee wild card, Turner High Line....

    A cool thing you can do with the VP Free is "short Shock" it. Run a 8.5x2.5 shock, it slackens and lowers the BB and reduces travel to 160. With a 150x12 rear, slack geo, with the ability to climb, you've got a real do anything machine! Head Angle with a 180 fork is around 65. Really feels like a mini DH that you can still xc with. Frame weight is only 1.5 to 2lbs over a nomad I think?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: socalMX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,275
    Slim,really?When have you heard of Nomads being "killed"?Im about his size & weight and beat the $hit out of mine and it is showing no signs of anything!As for the OP,a freeride bike is not what hes looking for,although those are some nice bikes you have mentioned!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,525
    i agree with slim. I weigh 215 geared up and I ve broken several 6" frames without even going all that big (most recently a Rune-within warranty period though). Now I use a Bullit with a single-crown 7" fork as a do-it-all bike and really enjoying it, no problems climbing and utmost confidence on the descents (though i think the bullit pedals better than many 7" fr bikes). Rune is relegated to lighter-duty riding with tons of climbing.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    169
    I tried for several years for the one bike setup and it simply never worked. If you're doing less demanding downhill and ride where the climbs are not severe you can get away with it but try pedaling a 35 lb AM rig over the Lenawee in Colorado or riding a 29 lb 5" travel trail bike down High Speed Dirt or Jam Rock at Keystone. Alas I'm back to one bike for going up and one for going down albeit my going up bike has a hint of DH geometry in the Banshee Spitfire.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,569
    Quote Originally Posted by kburati View Post
    I tried for several years for the one bike setup and it simply never worked. If you're doing less demanding downhill and ride where the climbs are not severe you can get away with it but try pedaling a 35 lb AM rig over the Lenawee in Colorado or riding a 29 lb 5" travel trail bike down High Speed Dirt or Jam Rock at Keystone. Alas I'm back to one bike for going up and one for going down albeit my going up bike has a hint of DH geometry in the Banshee Spitfire.
    Love my new Spitty!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,666
    Quote Originally Posted by socalMX View Post
    Slim,really?When have you heard of Nomads being "killed"?Im about his size & weight and beat the $hit out of mine and it is showing no signs of anything!As for the OP,a freeride bike is not what hes looking for,although those are some nice bikes you have mentioned!
    Don't get me wrong, I'm a nomad lover. I've pounded mine for 2.5 years and have been very happy with it. I weigh 150 though. The nomad is light and tough, but most heavy guys just kill stuff. Reason I don't recommend the nomad is because he said he maybe wants one bike that can sub for a DH bike at times. Heavy guys and regular DH on a nomad is probably asking for trouble. I'm glad your nomad is solid for, but you may be super smooth. Some guys kill stuff others don't. I have marks on my non drive side chain stay from it flexing into my crank arm! Just think if weighed 200lbs or more. I've owned a bullit, and vp free, I think they are better options for heavy guys that kill parts, and you have 150 rear options on those bikes unlike the nomad, and they are both rated dual crowns. Nomad is only rated for a 180 fork. Depending on how much DH a guy wants to do, I would want a dual crown option for my one do all bike.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,666
    Quote Originally Posted by kburati View Post
    I tried for several years for the one bike setup and it simply never worked. If you're doing less demanding downhill and ride where the climbs are not severe you can get away with it but try pedaling a 35 lb AM rig over the Lenawee in Colorado or riding a 29 lb 5" travel trail bike down High Speed Dirt or Jam Rock at Keystone. Alas I'm back to one bike for going up and one for going down albeit my going up bike has a hint of DH geometry in the Banshee Spitfire.
    Looks like we ride the same trails! I just got back from riding Trestle DH on my morewood Izumi, no lift ticket. I have it set up with a 32t and 11/34 cassette so climbing the rd is no big deal. My nomad is out of commission with a busted lower link, so I'm using my DH bike as an AM right now. My nomad will handle everything at WP and Keystone but I like having a DH bike because they are fun. I've done Lenewee with add on local's trails around montezuma making a long epic xc loop including out of bounds keystone stuff, but my nomad weights 31.5, that's with a 8" front rotor 2.5 tires and 36 180. Very capable bike that I feel is the perfect do all bike, but not necessarily for heavy guys that have a history of braking stuff. A guy can def have one bike that they can do anything on including epic xc and gnar DH. If I had to sell my DH bike, I would still ride the same lines at our resorts as well as epic xc stuff on my nomad.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620
    you folks sure have given me alot to think about. If i go the trail bike route it needs to be burly, but alot of what i will do depends on what scott does. Hopefully the frame gets warrintied and than i can work on the quiver.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-003res.jpg  

    one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-004res.jpg  


  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620
    this break was the year before. I wonder what will be next.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-img_0977.jpg  

    one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-img_0978.jpg  


  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: masterofnone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,239
    There is no substitute for a real downhill or big freeride bike when hitting the steep stuff. Yeah you can ride a shorter travel bike in that stuff but it's apples and oranges. I'm thinking of selling my 4" xc bike and freeride bike for most of the local riding around here and getting a lightish 6" AM rig, it should be a good climber that can hit the bigger lines. I'm not parting with the big bike for big trails with ski lifts on the weekends though, no way jack. I think you should have two bikes (at least).

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620
    socal

    yes it is kind of funny we both have similiar body sizes and instead of posting quad picks i would post snowmobile picks.

    tim

  25. #25
    Flyin Pig
    Reputation: IvanLasston's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    159
    I'm 5'7" and 240 (probably closer to 245 to 250 armored) and ride a Nomad. I even used it for 2 seasons of downhilling at Colorado resorts (Keystone and Winter Park). The only thing that broke was my Lyrik Fork. I would DH every weekend though - and it was half way through the season before the Fork broke on me. (It blew out and leaked oil around July, 2 years in a row) Maybe if I got a 180 fork it would have lasted longer, I don't know.

    That being said - I had a choice of getting a 180mm fork or getting a DH bike - I got an used DH bike and save the nomad for trail riding. I got tired of having the nomad in the shop for a week or two every summer fixing the fork. I am not a good rider and people who can ride "light" would probably have done fine with the fork I have.

    If I only did the lift assisted thing once or twice a year I think the Nomad would have been fine. Every weekend was too much for the components I have IMHO. But as a trail bike in Colorado, the Nomad handles everything just fine - including pedaling uphill, jumping at the local bike parks, (as I said lift assisted downhilling for the most part) and actually trail riding.

  26. #26
    Stu
    Stu is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    77

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jgusta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,967
    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    Well i broke my scott ransom 10 frame again. Last year was the rocker arm this year the chain stay. the bike is a 2007 and has been road hard. the funny thing is the carbon has never broke, just the metal alloy. For the most part it has been a good bike but has had some issues. But i have loved the versatility from big backcountry rides like 7 summits in rossland. To 23,000 vert in one day at silver mt ski resort here in north idaho.

    But i keep wondering if i should get a 4 inch trail bike and a full on downhill bike. I only do the ski resort thing a couple of days a year. and the ride the frame broke on was a 12 mile fire road climb (2 1\2 hour climb) followed by a 7 mile single track ridge ride with a 3 mile single track downhill. I was 2\3 of the way thru the ridge ride section when the chainstay broke. So i do like the all mountain side of things. long grunt followed by trail than bomb's away. Most of my after work rides around here are a hour climb followed by a good dowhill.

    What do you think? 6 inch all mountain or 4 inch trail and a downhill bike?
    If if matters i am 6'1 210 and ride aggresively. I reside in north idaho with alot of rooty rocky, mountain terrain, not to many flowy, flat trails.


    thanks
    tim
    Good question. I would say just go with a 6" AM bike built up to your style of riding and terrain you ride on (light or burly components, coil or air) or if you are the kind of rider that periodic shuttles and/or hits the lifts and is into the DH scene or wants to DH more, but still enjoys trail riding and can swing it, then it's a no brainer and try to get a dedicated DH and 5-6" trail bike.

    I am about 215lbs geared, ride pretty hard as well (in a leg immobilizer for another 4 weeks as we speek and have cracked or broken ever frame I have owned) and have always wanted to have a "real" dedicatd DH bike, but I don't shuttle much, if at all, don't typically hit the lifts, so I just have one 6" AM bike that I use for everything from aggro XC to light DH/FR at most (34lb Rune) with all the parts on it that I like and can take some abuse.
    Ride On!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Haus Boss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,494
    Quote Originally Posted by dwyooaj View Post
    i agree with slim. I weigh 215 geared up and I ve broken several 6" frames without even going all that big (most recently a Rune-within warranty period though). Now I use a Bullit with a single-crown 7" fork as a do-it-all bike and really enjoying it, no problems climbing and utmost confidence on the descents (though i think the bullit pedals better than many 7" fr bikes). Rune is relegated to lighter-duty riding with tons of climbing.
    Which part of your frame did you break/crack on your Rune? It seems they're built fairly tough but as sales have picked up the stress area around the bottom bracket has been exposed as the Runes achilles heal. I don't quite get why the spitty gets a gusset down there but the Rune doesnt.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Haus Boss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,494
    Two more pedal friendly freeride bikes to consider:

    Norco Truax. 7"
    Diamondback Scapegoat 6"

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,666
    Quote Originally Posted by dwyooaj View Post
    i agree with slim. I weigh 215 geared up and I ve broken several 6" frames without even going all that big (most recently a Rune-within warranty period though). Now I use a Bullit with a single-crown 7" fork as a do-it-all bike and really enjoying it, no problems climbing and utmost confidence on the descents (though i think the bullit pedals better than many 7" fr bikes). Rune is relegated to lighter-duty riding with tons of climbing.
    I've owned a bullit and agree it pedals very well. WAY better than most people think. Great bike for a parts killer. A bullit with air shock is very close to the weight of a nomad with a coil. You can still build a bullit competitively light.

  31. #31
    Shred all that can be
    Reputation: sickspeed16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    800
    Ibis mojo HD. You can even throw a 180 travel fork on it and now you can even get a tapered steerer and HT with an angleset.. 3 year frame warranty... OHHH YEAHHHH GET SOME!
    "This sticker is dangerous and inconvienent, but I do love Fig Newtons"

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BaeckerX1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,262
    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss View Post
    Which part of your frame did you break/crack on your Rune? It seems they're built fairly tough but as sales have picked up the stress area around the bottom bracket has been exposed as the Runes achilles heal. I don't quite get why the spitty gets a gusset down there but the Rune doesnt.
    Probably because the Rune came out first and they changed that when they created the Spitfire? They probably just haven't updated the Rune frame yet. One would hope they would if there are a lot of issues popping up. My 2011 Tomac Snyper rear triangle is completely different than the 2010 was with better reinforcement, wishbone strut (instead of just on the one side), and a burlier seatstay brace. It's stiffer all around. The 2009, 2010, and 2011 are all noticeably different. There are some companies that are innovating quite quickly and really change a bike if issues come up. I'd hope Banshee would step up to the plate and correct this if it's as big of an issue as you say. Then again, I've heard people ride some really gnarly terrain on their Runes.
    Gotta get up to get down.
    LMB

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620
    I busted the dust off of my old cross country bike and i already miss my all mountain bike.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: starship303's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    292
    Definitely consider the Ibis Mojo HD in both 160 & 140 guise...

    Picture a Mojo HD140 - rear travel of 140mm, with an air rear shock & 140-150mm travel trail fork for a light, fast (68 degree HA with 150mm fork), efficient setup for the all-day epic trail days. Light enough a bike for a 1x10 (+ guide) setup for most people too.

    Then get the Mojo HD160 "Limbo Chips" to set the rear travel to 160mm. Set up with a coil shock, 170 DH Lyrik or 180 36 Fox on the front & some more DH oriented tires and you then have a stiff, slack (66 degree HA with 180mm fork), plush bike for the 'heavy days'. You could even throw in a more DH wheelset to keep the 140mm setup even lighter with a more trail wheelset. A Cane Creek Angleset is also an option if you want more slack.

    One frame, two forks + two shocks = two pretty dedicated bikes in one. =)

    Quite sure the super stiff Mojo HD would be able to manage your weight too (worth asking Ibis about that though perhaps).

    The Last Herb AM is also an intruging option. DH-oriented geo, tough as nails too but still possibly efficient enough for all day rides (there isn't much feedback on these bikes yet, but they look very promising!).

    Nomad Carbon would be another choice, but IMO the Ibis is a better, more versatile frame.

    *
    Last edited by starship303; 07-21-2011 at 09:35 PM.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: starship303's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    292
    Also, if weight is less of a concern for you perhaps a Intense Uzzi VP? Or a Transition Covert with big forks? A pr0n option would be a Nicolai Helius AM or AFR. Mmmm

    *

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tracerey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    56
    I'd go for Intense Tracer VP or Tracer 2. I love this Bike...it's a do it all bike.
    Best,

    Tracerey

    (For we that live to cycle must cycle to live)

  37. #37
    Moose Member
    Reputation: Moosey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,195
    trek remedy?

    some guy on the DH forum did a really nice write up about how its a perfect do all bike. He even raced DH on it....

    if 2 bikes then i say a 5-6" aggressive trail bike, and then a full blown DH...


    Remedy link
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ht=Trek+Remedy

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tracerey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    56

    Traci

    Hi All, Just want to share my do it all MTB.

    Frame: Intense Tracer VP (Small)
    Fork: Fox Talas 32 15mm QR
    Shock: Fox RP23 Boost Valve
    Headset: Chris King Dovolution
    Bottom Bracket: Chris King
    Handle Bar: Easton Monkey Light
    Stem: Thomson X4 70mm, 0 degrees
    Grip: Lizard Skin Lock-On Northshore
    Brake: Shimano XT
    Rotor: Hope Floating Disc (8" & 7")
    Crank: Shimano XT (9 speed)
    Pedal: Shimano XTR
    Shifter: Shimano XTR Rapidfire
    Front Derailluer: Shimano XTR
    Rear Derailluer: Shimano XT
    Cassett: Shimano XTR
    Chain: Shimano XTR
    Saddle: Intense "Sacred Heart"
    Seatpost: KS950i (Remote)
    Seat clamp: Thomson seat clamp
    Wheelset: Chris King Hubs, ZTR Flow
    Tire: Maxxis Crossmax UST


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-traci.jpg  

    Last edited by tracerey; 07-22-2011 at 01:03 AM.
    Best,

    Tracerey

    (For we that live to cycle must cycle to live)

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: socalMX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,275
    Tracery,nice looking Intense!Unfortionately it lacks a bit in travel to be a true do all bike.That category is for AM bikes with 6+ travel...My Nomad fits the bill...That being said,I am close to buying a Tracer for my next XC rig!!!

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,620
    scott is warranting the broken part on the frame. so a big thank you to scott. I might have to sell the ransom after this season and find a new all mountain bike for next year and try and find a used down hill bike. thanks for the input everyone.

    will a genius hold up?

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,525
    yes, it broke at the bottom bracket weld.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haus Boss View Post
    Which part of your frame did you break/crack on your Rune? It seems they're built fairly tough but as sales have picked up the stress area around the bottom bracket has been exposed as the Runes achilles heal. I don't quite get why the spitty gets a gusset down there but the Rune doesnt.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,525
    yeah, my friend just got an hd 160, with a totem. I took it for a little spin. Now Im trying to get together the dough to get one.

    Quote Originally Posted by starship303 View Post
    Definitely consider the Ibis Mojo HD in both 160 & 140 guise...

    Picture a Mojo HD140 - rear travel of 140mm, with an air rear shock & 140-150mm travel trail fork for a light, fast (68 degree HA with 150mm fork), efficient setup for the all-day epic trail days. Light enough a bike for a 1x10 (+ guide) setup for most people too.

    Then get the Mojo HD160 "Limbo Chips" to set the rear travel to 160mm. Set up with a coil shock, 170 DH Lyrik or 180 36 Fox on the front & some more DH oriented tires and you then have a stiff, slack (66 degree HA with 180mm fork), plush bike for the 'heavy days'. You could even throw in a more DH wheelset to keep the 140mm setup even lighter with a more trail wheelset. A Cane Creek Angleset is also an option if you want more slack.

    One frame, two forks + two shocks = two pretty dedicated bikes in one. =)

    Quite sure the super stiff Mojo HD would be able to manage your weight too (worth asking Ibis about that though perhaps).

    The Last Herb AM is also an intruging option. DH-oriented geo, tough as nails too but still possibly efficient enough for all day rides (there isn't much feedback on these bikes yet, but they look very promising!).

    Nomad Carbon would be another choice, but IMO the Ibis is a better, more versatile frame.

    *

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,099

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    22
    I say buy three bikes. XC AM and DH.

    Sent from my Droid Incredible.

  45. #45
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,391
    get two bikes... almost killed my nomad, had the same problem with the180 fork leaking
    oil after half the season. blew a 180 marzocchi twice before the fox. traded it in for a dh bike and a bottlerocket for everything else...
    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mullen119's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    4,455
    Maybe its just me, But I would never pay 3800 bucks for a bike that comes speced with parts that should be on a 2800 dollar bike (like a fork with only a rebound damper)

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: aliikane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,351
    5 bikes. xc bike 100mm, trail bike 120mm, all mountain bike 150mm, freeride bike 160-180mm, downhill bike 200mm.

  48. #48
    Shred all that can be
    Reputation: sickspeed16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    800
    +1... go with 5
    "This sticker is dangerous and inconvienent, but I do love Fig Newtons"

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by mullen119 View Post
    Maybe its just me, But I would never pay 3800 bucks for a bike that comes speced with parts that should be on a 2800 dollar bike (like a fork with only a rebound damper)
    + 1. You can build a better bike for the same price, or maybe a tad bit more

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,387
    Thread about a 6' 10" 448 lb guy on the Clidesdales forum loving his Turner 5 Spot XXL. Don't know how he rides but if that frame is surviving him...
    agmtb

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    248
    Just get a Knolly and you won't have to worry anymore
    6'5" at 235. Literally had people try to hurt my Knolly Endorphin and Delerium T and they could not. I have hurt ever other frame I have owned and my Endorphin is 4.5 years old of very hard riding. I'd say Chilocotin unless you ride any lift served stuff and then Delerium. They go up way better than they should for the weight. They have zero flex and they are bombproof. I wanted a Mojo HD for a long time until I just rode one last weekend. It felt light and fun but the flex never let me feel confident

  52. #52
    inner peace to make peace
    Reputation: TrailNut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,284
    I like the two bike solution:
    One for XC and the other for DH/AM.
    “Everyday is a good day,” from the Blue Cliff Records, Yun-men (864-949 AD).

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    455
    I'm sort of with TrailNut.

    Two bikes:
    1) A 33lb AM/DH for bike parks but can still pedal well uphill
    2) A 25lb slack 5" trail bike with a snappy response

    I have a Nomad and a Yeti ASR 5. I wish Rockshox made a Totem Coil U-Turn. A bigger guy might want something burlier for an AM/DH bike.

    It's nice knowing that:
    1) I can bring a confidence-building mini-DH bike to the top of a brutal climb
    2) I don't have to bring a mini-DH bike with me on trails where it'd be overkill

  54. #54
    OMG!
    Reputation: adjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    412
    I like the trail bike/dh bike stable. My bikes are a specialized enduro and a demo 8. Both bikes are excellent at what they were designed to do.

    If you want a bike that can "do it all", it's not going to be great at either, but bikes these days come pretty close. I didn't read the replies but I'm sure people have suggested bikes like The One or the Mojo HD etc

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirtrider76's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2,050
    I've been really happy with my Banshee Rune so far and it get's used for everything.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb:skep:

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29
    Multiple bikes! Start building your quiver!


    2007 Rocky Mountain Slayer
    2013 Trek Fuel
    2012 Devinci Wilson

  57. #57
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31,536
    Happy with the Enduro 29er for sure, it rips the trails, great for the longer stuff due to the weight and capability and I don't feel like I'm fighting it at all on the DHs at the ski resort. Really fun bike to "ride it all", compared to some that are so far out of their element it's not fun. If I got something else it might be a real light carbon hardtail to do some competitive XC racing...Already done some DH racing on the Enduro.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,162
    Ibis Mojo HD 160.....with a 180 Talas and CCDB Air CS Shock.

  59. #59
    LCW
    LCW is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LCW's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4,358

    one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike

    I do most everything on my 575 - it's built up on the burly side, with 2.5 DHF Minion front, Easton Haven rims, Fox 36 160, chain-guide, 50mm stem, platforms, and a dropper post... 180mm rotors front & rear... far from "light" @ 31.5 lbs, but certainly not super heavy... can do everything from trail riding, climbs well, and do some light duty DH... FUN bike... with the bike fork up front, it's slackened out (as measured) to a hair under 66 deg... but with the CTD rear shock, flipping it to 'D' can still climb amazingly well (glad I ditched the RP23... the CTD descends, pedals and climbs way better)...

    I'd love to have a full DH bike, but truthfully if I did, I'd probably keep the 575 in the exact same setup as it is now...


    Santa Cruz Hightower LT


  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dhmatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    224
    This is my solution to the "one bike" I think the weight is right around 29 pounds.
    BlackMarket Roam
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails one bike to do it all versus trail bike and downhill bike-roam1.jpg  


  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,569
    LOL, you guys do realize this thread is nearly 2.5 years old?! Having said that, a lot has changed in that time and I would have said 2 bikes for sure in 2011 but now that I've ridden a carbon Bronson, not so sure. It's the first bike I really feel is NOT a compromise between the disciplines and others are proving just as worthy (Mach 6, Rune, Troy, etc.) with a big part of that being the intermediate wheel size, slacker angles and shorter stems/wider bars. The evolution continues!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,705
    I'd rent a DH bike every time I went if it was a "couple times a year" kind of thing.

    No use buying a $3k+ bike when you can rent one 3x a year (example) for $150.

Similar Threads

  1. DownHill bike for trail riding???
    By yellowpasta2000 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 69
    Last Post: 08-03-2013, 08:13 AM
  2. Road Bike versus Mountain Bike
    By stumpbumper in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-13-2011, 10:59 AM
  3. New freeride/downhill bike help, sx trail or 7point7?
    By rob112 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-09-2006, 06:44 AM
  4. downhill/freeride/trail bike
    By Mr. Lemons in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-13-2005, 07:30 PM
  5. Nokians+mt bike versus rd bike with rd tires
    By Chester in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-26-2004, 01:29 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.