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  1. #1
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    Nomad 2 26er VS any NEW all-mountain

    I've recently started riding with a pretty fast group of guys (i'm the slowest of the bunch), especially on the climbs and they all say I would benefit greatly from a new bike. We ride the CO front range, so there's some big climbs with plenty of tech and big descents to follow.
    My current setup is a 2012 aluminum Nomad 2 26" wheeled bike, newish Pike 160, RP23 shock tuned by AVA, 1x10, bla bla bla. Anyway, they might be totally right, I just don't understand how a newer but similar bike is going to be that much better? Has suspension and frame design improved that much over the past few years?
    I know everyone says demo demo demo, but I don't have the time, patience or $$ to keep riding every bike out there. Besides unless I can ride different bikes back to back on the same trail, I doubt I could make a sensible comparison between two bikes anyway. In the coming weeks I'll try to demo a bike or two, just looking for opinions really.
    Last edited by hotrozz; 04-18-2016 at 08:16 PM.

  2. #2
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    Don't get sucked into the "you need a new bike" mentality. The Nomad from that year is an awesome bike. My only complaint about it is that the head angle is a little steep and the bike is a bit taller than some of the more modern geometries. That said, its geometry is not radically different to the point that it will mean MINUTES added to your times or anything. It's not a deal-breaker. The suspension design is superb, and on-par with anything new.

    But even beyond all of that, it is the rider, not the bike. It would be one thing if you were riding a 2001 Kona Stinky and your friends were on 2016 fare. I would encourage you to just ride more, smile more, and get stronger. Your bike is capable of pretty much anything you are. I ride a 2012 SX Trail, which has a bit more modern geometry and a bit more "DHish" than your Nomad, but a 26" bike nonetheless. Where I ride locally, I would say I'm still in the 98th percentile for speed (up, but especially down), and anymore most people are on newer bikes than mine. It's not the bike...
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  3. #3
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    Great answer and feedback, thanks. I really don't have any complaints about my Nomad, I was just thinking maybe I'm really missing out on the new bikes and don't even know it.
    I would like a slightly more slack head angle for the DH stuff, maybe an angleset could be the difference.

  4. #4
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    Yeah I agree with cookiemonster in that if it was a much older bike then you would benefit. Only thing I would say is see if there is some way you can lighten the bike up a bit to add to the climbing capabilities (e.g. drop the fork from 160 to 140 maybe or newer, lightweight-ish wheels and tires) but that is somewhat subjective.

    From what I remember the Nomad was never a great pedal bike as it was geared toward the more AM side of riding which means, slow and steady climbs up with chunky gnar downhill. Question is, could you BENEFIT from a new bike? Well if you are a racer or want to show off to your new riding buddies then YES. If you are more concerned with having fun and riding then I would say NO. Build up some extra leg strength to do small sprints up the hill to keep up with your buddies and then smoke them on the DH sections as the Nomad just eats that up.

  5. #5
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    An angleset could make a nice difference. 1 degree slacker would put it well within what I call the "fun zone." That Nomad isn't too far off as it is; it's just a tad steep.

    Another thing you could try, if you haven't already, is getting a shorty DH stem (as long as you aren't cramped already) and wide, modern bars. That will vastly improve your position on the bike and make it feel more aggressive if you're currently using a longer stem and narrower bars. Also, I have not found those two items to hurt any bike's climbing ability in the least.

    There is one other thing, and I don't know if anybody makes these (my friend is a machinist and made them for his newer Nomad), but you can use offset bushings on your shock mount to slack out the head angle a little more. Anyway, the one he made is basically an eccentric front shock bushing that allows the shock to be mounted slightly forward from its stock position, and it slacks out the head angle by about 1 degree. It could be that nobody manufactures those though.
    Bikes belong in Wilderness areas.

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    worm gear drive down the seat tube and troll those fools!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieMonster View Post
    There is one other thing, and I don't know if anybody makes these (my friend is a machinist and made them for his newer Nomad), but you can use offset bushings on your shock mount to slack out the head angle a little more.
    Offsetbushings.com | Standard & Offset bicycle shock hardware ? Offset Bushings | Shock Mounting Hardware

    Before you order them though, fully deflate the shock and compress it all the way, then check to see that all the moving parts have enough clearance for an even lower position. On some bikes the rear wheel or suspension parts will bash into things if you lower the position further than the stock setting.

  8. #8
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    Wow, great stuff guys! I'm feeling better about the ol' Nomad already. It't a fairly light build as is coming in around 30-31 lbs. The Pike fork is the dual position 130/160 and I do find it beneficial for climbing. I'm running a 60mm stem (I might try a shorter one) and 750 mm carbon bars. Plus I just had the frame powder coated hotrod black and it looks sick.
    I just gotta get stronger on the climbs, the DH I feel like I do pretty well for what it's worth.
    Aerius thank you for the link, I just ordered a pair of those bushings, so much more affordable than an angleset. Woohoo

  9. #9
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    +1 on keeping the Nomad. Those bikes were the precursor to the modern "enduro" bike. Great all arounder!

  10. #10
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    Its a 160mm bike. They're all sluggish up climbs. If you got a new 160mm bike, it could easily be slower.

    A newer trend with long travel bikes is to tone down the wheels. If you're on a 650 gram rim running 2.5 inch nevegals, that's going to slow the crap out of you.

    Carbon rims got affordable, and there's light, big volume fast rolling tires. Those are the real big changes. Guys on 6+ inch bikes are running wheels lighter than xc bikes from 2010ish.

  11. #11
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    Nomad 2 can handle strong wheels, great bike... like the thread title too
    video=youtube;][/video]...

  12. #12
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    Some benefits to gain with a new bike. There are now a TON of mid travel bikes that climb like nobody's business but still descend probably just as good or better than yesterdays AM sleds. Newest geo is mainly lower BB's, longer top tube/reach, slacker head tubes & steeper seat tubes which make superior all rounders. That being said as stated above, the Nomad is a nice machine, had all 3 versions ( I no longer fancy VPP after trying more active designs) that you could easily live with. BUT you might want to do the math, say you sell your Nomad for ~2k, you could put that towards one of the many kick ass 27.5ers available for +~3k, heck many people spend that 1k to upgrade a fork or wheelset. A few I think are really good are the award winning (2016 BikeRadar bike of the year) Whyte T-130 and the Kona Process 134, just to name a few. Oh yea, 27.5 IS the real deal. I tried and tried to go back to my 26er, now its just my loaner for when the odd friend wants to try MTB! Much to think about!

  13. #13
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    Can I ask what kind of bikes the other guys are riding? It makes a big difference if they are riding light 29er's and you're on a Nomad.

    Also, as mentioned in this thread, tires can make a big difference. As well as wheels.

  14. #14
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    The nomad rules. Nothing wrong with the 2012 model it's still a awsome bike. The only thing what may make you slower is your wheel size or tyre choice of just could be your fitness but over all you don't need a new bike.

  15. #15
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    It sounds more like the difference is the type of bike you're riding compared to the other people in the group rather than how "new" your bike is.

    What are they on? As others have said if they're on more strictly trail type 29er rides the difference is really going to be really accentuated and it's not surprising you'd be towards the back of the pack. That kinda bike is going to leave a 6" 26er in dust on everything but maybe the descents given equal ability riders.

    It's probably also just the change in your riding group. You said you just recently joined this group and that they are fast. I take it they are fast compared to your previous group (or your solo pace) that you've normally kept. That may just be a natural thing and you'll likely notice yourself pushing harder/faster to keep up with group as you continue to ride. The bike can certainly make a difference, but you have to give yourself some time to break yourself in with the new group and figure out what's going to help you push and keep up. This is pretty normal when picking up with a new group. You just have to find your fit. Maybe you're not gonna be the guy out front with this group. There's always someone faster and fitter, but it makes you work to keep up and not get dropped.

  16. #16
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    Increase your high and low gear range, get a cheap triple crank and put two rings on
    video=youtube;][/video]...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by socalMX View Post
    Some benefits to gain with a new bike. There are now a TON of mid travel bikes that climb like nobody's business but still descend probably just as good or better than yesterdays AM sleds. Newest geo is mainly lower BB's, longer top tube/reach, slacker head tubes & steeper seat tubes which make superior all rounders. That being said as stated above, the Nomad is a nice machine, had all 3 versions ( I no longer fancy VPP after trying more active designs) that you could easily live with. BUT you might want to do the math, say you sell your Nomad for ~2k, you could put that towards one of the many kick ass 27.5ers available for +~3k, heck many people spend that 1k to upgrade a fork or wheelset. A few I think are really good are the award winning (2016 BikeRadar bike of the year) Whyte T-130 and the Kona Process 134, just to name a few. Oh yea, 27.5 IS the real deal. I tried and tried to go back to my 26er, now its just my loaner for when the odd friend wants to try MTB! Much to think about!
    Agreed! I find that the new Turner RFX climbs as well or better than many shorter-travel bikes I've ridden recently: INTERBIKE 2015: Turner RFX v4.0 Review (160MM rear travel) ? DIRT MERCHANT BIKES

    Some other bikes that I would considering demoing as good climbing mid travel bikes are:

    Santa Cruz Bronson 2: INTERBIKE 2015: Santa Cruz Bronson Review (150mm travel) ? DIRT MERCHANT BIKES
    Pivot Mach 429 Trail (a 29er, but has similar capabilities to a mid-travel 27.5 bike): INTERBIKE 2015: Pivot Mach 429 Trail Review (29er with 116mm travel) ? DIRT MERCHANT BIKES

    Also, I've not ridden either, but would consider the Ibis HD3 (based on feedback from others) and the Yeti SB-6 (based on experience on the older SB-66)
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  18. #18
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    I think the 2012 Nomad had a 67 degree HTA, but it was based on a fork with an "axle to crown" of 565 mm. The 26" Pike in a 160 has an A2C of 542 mm. This would steepen the HTA a bit. It may make climbing a bit better and descending a bit more difficult. 66 or 67 degrees is pretty nice for a trail bike and if you are more downhill oriented, slacker is better. At some point you may want to get a new bike, but for now, like others have said, I'd just work on going lighter as long as it doesn't break the bank.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotrozz View Post
    Great answer and feedback, thanks. I really don't have any complaints about my Nomad, I was just thinking maybe I'm really missing out on the new bikes and don't even know it.
    I would like a slightly more slack head angle for the DH stuff, maybe an angleset could be the difference.
    I've got a 2008/09 Nomad MK2 AL with Avy'd DHX Air and mid-grade build kit. I also have a 2014 Pivot M6 carbon with carbon everything and XX1 drivetrain.

    The M6 is 8lbs lighter than my Nomad, which on longer rides makes a lot of difference and the bigger wheels are more efficient in our chunky terrain.

    That said I'm pretty sure if I bling'd my Nomad out and got the weight closer it would be a comparable bike. Not the same, but not in another league...at least for our local terrain.

    Two things I did to my Nomad which really improved the performance were:

    1. Conti Trail King 2.4" tires on wide rims. It's the biggest tire I can fit in the rear and it closes the roll through gap between my Nomad and the M6. Not as good, but way better than the smallish 2.3" tires I had on the Nomad in the past.

    2. Avy'd DHX Air turned the rear suspension from meh to amazing.

    To be honest the main reason I got the new bike was I had ridden the Nomad so much I just wanted a change of pace. I still ride the Nomad all winter to keep the new bike out of the muck and it is still and amazing ride. I have no plans to retire it.
    Safe riding,

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by avidthrasher View Post
    It sounds more like the difference is the type of bike you're riding compared to the other people in the group rather than how "new" your bike is.

    What are they on? As others have said if they're on more strictly trail type 29er rides the difference is really going to be really accentuated and it's not surprising you'd be towards the back of the pack. That kinda bike is going to leave a 6" 26er in dust on everything but maybe the descents given equal ability riders.

    It's probably also just the change in your riding group. You said you just recently joined this group and that they are fast. I take it they are fast compared to your previous group (or your solo pace) that you've normally kept. That may just be a natural thing and you'll likely notice yourself pushing harder/faster to keep up with group as you continue to ride. The bike can certainly make a difference, but you have to give yourself some time to break yourself in with the new group and figure out what's going to help you push and keep up. This is pretty normal when picking up with a new group. You just have to find your fit. Maybe you're not gonna be the guy out front with this group. There's always someone faster and fitter, but it makes you work to keep up and not get dropped.
    I honestly don't pay that much attention to what other people are riding. I think the strongest climber is on a pivot Mach 429, couple more on newer pivots maybe mach 5.7 or 6? The fastest DH rider is on a megatrail. You're right, they are a much faster group than the group I used to ride with or my solo pace, and definitely am pushed to try to keep up.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I think the 2012 Nomad had a 67 degree HTA, but it was based on a fork with an "axle to crown" of 565 mm. The 26" Pike in a 160 has an A2C of 542 mm. This would steepen the HTA a bit. It may make climbing a bit better and descending a bit more difficult. 66 or 67 degrees is pretty nice for a trail bike and if you are more downhill oriented, slacker is better. At some point you may want to get a new bike, but for now, like others have said, I'd just work on going lighter as long as it doesn't break the bank.
    I somewhat recently swapped the original Fox 36 for the pike and seems like the A2C was nearly identical. The only real difference was trail, but don't remember which way.

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  22. #22
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    Ride your nomad. Ride some more, then when you are tired ride some more. You're fitness will skyrocket and you will be keeping up in no time. The average joe won't benefit from newer bikes like a pro will. We benefit from fitness instead. I have seen guys on old rigid 26 bikes from the late 90s absolutely leave people on $6k new 29ers in the dust.
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  23. #23
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    rent a 2016 higher end bike from a bike shop and see how it goes against your group on a familiar trail. I only say higher end because they will be closer to 30 pounds. That way weight is not an issue, just wheel size and geometry.

  24. #24
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    The N2 is a very capable bike and it sounds solid as you have it built, but...

    ...geometry for trail/AM bikes has changed radically since the N2 debuted in late '08. Modern bikes are far better climbers (and descenders) than the old Nomad or similar bikes of that time. It has little to do with the amount of travel.

    NO ONE can tell you what bike is right for you except you. I highly recommend you go kill a few rides at some demos where you directly compare your rig and the demo bike on the same trail. You will learn a great deal. When I made the leap from 26" wheels two and half years ago I did just that. I would ride my bike on whatever loop first then come back and repeat it on the demo. You will have a real time comparison to base your selection on. Try as many bikes as you can and take your time.

    My two cents? I wanted a heavy duty do-it-all Nomad-like bike and after demoing everthing (including a Nomad 3) I went with a Banshee Rune. You will not find a bad review of this bike or it's more trail oriented sibling the Spitfire. This particular review (which I agree with 100%) and riding my friends' bikes (they all ride Banhsees) sold me. Outside of full blown DH rig, they are peerless in their descending ability, but what really will blow your mind is how well they climb. Nothing, I mean nothing in that travel range (150-160mm) I have ridden climbs better.

    Good luck.
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  25. #25
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    It's 99% rider 1% bike.

    My guess is the best rider in your group would still be the best regardless of equipment. Nice equipment just allow skills to shine brightest, they don't produce skills that aren't there.

    With time, skills will grow. That said, having your bike set up properly goes a long way regardless of how nice or up to date it is. It's already been mentioned that your axle to crown is too short with the pike. Your frame was designed around a taller fork. Sell the pike and put a 36, lyrik, metric... on it. Or use an angleset. I don't advise using offset bushings because they change your leverage ratios.

    I would take an old but properly dialed in beater over a brand new less than ideally built bike. The nomad2 was considered a "super bike" just a few years ago. Just because the bike industry has moved on doesn't mean it's not a mean machine anymore!

  26. #26
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    I have a similar though that's bothering my mind , I currently have a 2012 Jekyll on which I've put some nice upgrades like DPA Pike , 25mm rims (EX1501 spline), GX drivetrain , Guide RS brakes , reverb etc. and wondered if it's worth to switch to a newer Geo 650b bike ? Have bikes really changed that fast ? ( on the same bike Jerome won EWS in 2014)

    Another option would be a 26 frame with newer Geo like Transition Suppressor or Banshee Rune but those are close to $/ 2000 and for those kind of money you can get a full on DH rig for example .

    What are your toughts ?
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogdan_mb View Post
    I have a similar though that's bothering my mind , I currently have a 2012 Jekyll on which I've put some nice upgrades like DPA Pike , 25mm rims (EX1501 spline), GX drivetrain , Guide RS brakes , reverb etc. and wondered if it's worth to switch to a newer Geo 650b bike ? Have bikes really changed that fast ? ( on the same bike Jerome won EWS in 2014)

    Another option would be a 26 frame with newer Geo like Transition Suppressor or Banshee Rune but those are close to $/ 2000 and for those kind of money you can get a full on DH rig for example .

    What are your toughts ?
    2012? If you love that bike keep riding it. It's just fine.

    If you get a new bike you'll get down the same trails in about the same time. You just be a few thousand poorer.
    Safe riding,

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogdan_mb View Post
    I have a similar though that's bothering my mind , I currently have a 2012 Jekyll on which I've put some nice upgrades like DPA Pike , 25mm rims (EX1501 spline), GX drivetrain , Guide RS brakes , reverb etc. and wondered if it's worth to switch to a newer Geo 650b bike ? Have bikes really changed that fast ? ( on the same bike Jerome won EWS in 2014)

    Another option would be a 26 frame with newer Geo like Transition Suppressor or Banshee Rune but those are close to $/ 2000 and for those kind of money you can get a full on DH rig for example .

    What are your toughts ?
    I own a suppressor, and it's a much faster descending bike than a jekyll, but it would have been a faster descending bike in 2012, too. It's a big long bike, and it needs to go fast to 'come on cam.' The jekyll was never designed to have that personality; the wheelbase is almost 4" shorter. Tight, narrow trails are more intuitive (and fun) on my jekyll-like long travel hardtail with it's much shorter wheelbase, although the suppressor isn't any slower there either, really.

    If i owned a jekyll i wouldn't be in any hurry to replace the frame with a rune/suppressor unless i was riding high speed trails that better suit the design.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    It's 99% rider 1% bike.

    My guess is the best rider in your group would still be the best regardless of equipment. Nice equipment just allow skills to shine brightest, they don't produce skills that aren't there.

    With time, skills will grow. That said, having your bike set up properly goes a long way regardless of how nice or up to date it is. It's already been mentioned that your axle to crown is too short with the pike. Your frame was designed around a taller fork. Sell the pike and put a 36, lyrik, metric... on it. Or use an angleset. I don't advise using offset bushings because they change your leverage ratios.

    I would take an old but properly dialed in beater over a brand new less than ideally built bike. The nomad2 was considered a "super bike" just a few years ago. Just because the bike industry has moved on doesn't mean it's not a mean machine anymore!
    This is fantasy talk. The more skilled the rider is, the less the bike matters, but it's crazy to think there's a point where you can be so skilled that the bike hardly matters at all. When you already have the riding experience and skill, you can transfer that to any other bike easily, but bad bikes have limits as to how hard they can be pushed, which hold back the skilled rider, while someone without any inclination to ride hard is considered to be fine on such a bike. When you're trying to gain such experience and skill, it's a huge detriment to be on something that's already overwhelming you with other bike handling demands. In fact, if you're struggling and are skipping out on challenges deemed too risky, you're only setting up mental walls that are steeped in fear. If you try to recklessly try to overcome those fears, you risk bad experiences that result in trauma, which is even more detrimental, as you lose a lot of time to "heal" the trauma (ex. experiencing a near tragedy landing a jump, making you avoid jumps for weeks/months).

    I'd say, realistically, at the pro level it's 15% bike and 85% rider. At the beginner level, under someone who has next to nothing in terms of athletic talent, it's more like 85% bike, and 15% rider. Take an avid skier, surfer, or road cyclist, and put them on a mountain bike for the first time (basically something to do in the off-season for someone athletic), then it's more like 65% bike and 35% rider, but within a month on a good FS bike following more skilled riders, that can change to 35% bike and 65% rider due to the experience gained. Though, if on a heavy but reliably-built HT, a month will only show them that they're learning very slowly and makes them imagine about the potential of upgrading just to level out the playing field with average riders.

    A bike demo will open your eyes as to what newer bikes can offer. As long as you have a GPS or other measuring device (ex. stopwatch) to back-up your intuition, in case your intuition is wrong (it often is, unless you're a true expert in the topic), you should get clear answers to the question about why newer bikes may or may not be better. In my experience, bike demos can be dangerous to your bank account, as after you ride something truly better, you become spoiled and your current ride becomes classified as a "lesser" bike. Though, that risk goes away once you're on something truly good enough to not warrant upgrading.
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    This is fantasy talk. The more skilled the rider is, the less the bike matters, but it's crazy to think there's a point where you can be so skilled that the bike hardly matters at all. When you already have the riding experience and skill, you can transfer that to any other bike easily, but bad bikes have limits as to how hard they can be pushed, which hold back the skilled rider, while someone without any inclination to ride hard is considered to be fine on such a bike. When you're trying to gain such experience and skill, it's a huge detriment to be on something that's already overwhelming you with other bike handling demands. In fact, if you're struggling and are skipping out on challenges deemed too risky, you're only setting up mental walls that are steeped in fear. If you try to recklessly try to overcome those fears, you risk bad experiences that result in trauma, which is even more detrimental, as you lose a lot of time to "heal" the trauma (ex. experiencing a near tragedy landing a jump, making you avoid jumps for weeks/months).

    I'd say, realistically, at the pro level it's 15% bike and 85% rider. At the beginner level, under someone who has next to nothing in terms of athletic talent, it's more like 85% bike, and 15% rider. Take an avid skier, surfer, or road cyclist, and put them on a mountain bike for the first time (basically something to do in the off-season for someone athletic), then it's more like 65% bike and 35% rider, but within a month on a good FS bike following more skilled riders, that can change to 35% bike and 65% rider due to the experience gained. Though, if on a heavy but reliably-built HT, a month will only show them that they're learning very slowly and makes them imagine about the potential of upgrading just to level out the playing field with average riders.

    A bike demo will open your eyes as to what newer bikes can offer. As long as you have a GPS or other measuring device (ex. stopwatch) to back-up your intuition, in case your intuition is wrong (it often is, unless you're a true expert in the topic), you should get clear answers to the question about why newer bikes may or may not be better. In my experience, bike demos can be dangerous to your bank account, as after you ride something truly better, you become spoiled and your current ride becomes classified as a "lesser" bike. Though, that risk goes away once you're on something truly good enough to not warrant upgrading.
    I would disagree to an extent, I'd say at the pro level the bike can make a big difference. The thing is that the bikes they are all using are so similar at that point that it's nearly out of the equation, but put one of them on a 36lb AM rig with 2.5 tires, they won't be winning an XC race, or put the DH rider on a Trek Fuel and so on. At that elite level, you train and train and train and invest in stuff that is reliable and gets you results, then you race your rear end off, because some days your body just doesn't work as well as others, some courses or conditions favor certain riders, sometimes very small things that you do have a big effect on your time relative to the other guys. Like tire pressure, screw that up and it can easily cost you the race, and it's something "on the bike", maybe not a quality-of-bike feature, but the point is small things have a big effect at the elite level. One thing that kind of confused me a little during the winter-race season here was that I could pedal through turns, where other elite racers couldn't. I don't know if it was my 4.7" tires vs their 4, the studded tires (although most of the time people had some variation of studded, but not always) or my wider rims, but where I took a little hit for gyroscopic force and being able to turn as tight, I was able to consistently pedal through turns where everyone else was coasting. Little things like that can make a big difference overall and get you ahead of the pack with less energy, which is what happened. Not sure exactly why, but I got some ideas, but again, the bike *can* make a big difference at that level, as can many things. It's about repetition and practice at that level IME and throwing a bunch of **** against the wall to see what sticks (in other words, racing once in a blue moon is not going to get you results).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  31. #31
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    I'm in this boat right now with my Nomad 2C. It's a little more to do with feeling cramped and needing a roomier cockpit. At first I was going to just buy an XL Nomad 2 frame used on Pinkbike and do a swap (at most lose $200-$300) and maybe do an angle set to slacken it a bit...but then the new bike bug hit. Now I'm between an XL N2, Ibis Mojo HD3, or Nomad 3. With the new bike route I'm out $3K. Will the new bike route really be worth $3K is the question. And does anyone here use a N3 for true AM riding? I do everything with my N2 and don't want to make any compromises if I do go new.

  32. #32
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    My buddy got ride of his N2C to get a "modern" AM bike. He's now looking for a used N2 frame to buy and build up as he misses how it rides.

    I know 3 other N2 owners [including myself] and everyone still loves their N2 despite either owning or demoing "modern" bikes.

    It's a classic. It rides very well. Mine is 8yrs old and if it was my only bike I wouldn't mind at all. My only really complaint with it is the heavy build, but that's just a parts choice thing that can be solved.

    If it was me I'd get the larger N2 frame so you have the fit you want and then demo some other "modern" bikes. If you find one you like get it at some point, but keep the N2.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  33. #33
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    I agree with vikb. Finding a used N2 XL frame and swapping your parts over will be the cheapest way to see if an "old" Nomad will suit you.

    Just a couple things though, make sure your steerer tube is long enough for the XL frame, and your dropper post length will still work.

    Those are expensive things to find out they won't work on the bigger frame.

  34. #34
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    Thanks for the feedback. Anyone ever ride an N2 with push link to compare to the N3?
    Slugs love beer.

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    I'm in this same boat also. I have a 2013 Nomad 2 I think, but mine has a Fox 34 float 160 fork. I already upgraded the shock to a DXHC4 coil shock right after I got it, which made a world of difference in the handling. I've basically just ripped it for 5 years and love everything about it. But when I do bigger rides with my hardcore friends, the bike feels a little flimsy over some stuff. I've considered a 36 fork for a long time, and I've demoed several newer 27.5 bikes including my wife's Remedy 9.8 carbon, a Nomad 3, and an Ibis HD3. All 3 bikes feel very similar, and much different than my Nomad 2. They all feel like monster trucks, the front is much slacker and farther away with heavier forks (except the Remedy which is also a 34). They all descend over rocks better with a slacker, stiffer front end and bigger wheels, but they aren't as much fun for me to ride because it's much harder to pick up and throw around the front. Harder to lift it to wheelie or go up steps or rocks. My bike feels smaller and more compact and easier to manage. So I think I've decided to keep my current bike, and just upgrade the fork to a 36, but I think I'm going to use a 27.5 fork with a longer axle to crown to slack out the head angle just a little while also stiffening it up so it'll descend a little better over rock gardens and small drops and rollers.
    Jesse

  36. #36
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    Here's my 5 cents. I recently upgraded from fully worked blur ltc 140/160mm 2012 carbon bars frames, envy wheels, xtr, pikes. 12.5kg. To rocky slayer 27.5" 165/180mm. Fox 36, x2. Xt, alloy wheels. 13.1kg.

    I'm front of pack in my group on both bikes. I work hard the blur on the climbs to stay front of pack. I hold on to the top 3 dudes on the tech down. But if it's too tech I can't hold the fastest guys on their current am sleds on the down. The blur out climbs the nomad but isn't as good on the down.

    Enter the Slayer. 20mm more travel at each end. It's faster on the flat and going up. Now I'm not working as hard going up at the front of the pack. The guys next to me are breathing hard. On the down I now have no trouble keeping up with the fastest dudes. When it gets real tech then I'm leading it out at the front wondering why others are crashing behind me.

    New bikes are better. It's that simple. The bigger wheels roll faster, the long,low slack designs are more stable, shock/forks are smoother.

    Your old nomad is good on the down but it sucks uphill. Your buddies are right you will benefit from a new sled. It won't take you to front of pack.but it might take you to back of pack to lower mid pack. Enough to not be tail end charlie.

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