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  1. #1
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    New mondraker foxy carbon 29

    It has been presented today and it seems a very interesting model, all in one.
    https://www.mondraker.com/es/es/foxy-carbon-29 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saR878eyK4k








    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saR878eyK4k




  2. #2
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    Whenever I see a bike designed with the shock in the line of fire from crap off the rear wheel I cry a little inside. That sad little fender isn't going to do much.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  3. #3
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    Yes, that iis a poor place for a shock. I like the geometry, but would not get one for that reason, plus they are expensive. At least there is room for a LARGE water bottle. Lucky for me that forward geometry caught on and I can get other bikes with similar geometry.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for ďI suck at brake control.Ē Hereís a free tip: get better."

  4. #4
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    Short offset fork too...

  5. #5
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    I have the Dune 2014, which is the enduro 160 of 27.5, and I have not had any problem with the position of the shock absorber, the mudguard makes its fusion very well

  6. #6
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    Mondraker is so under the radar.
    The bike are not so much expensive compared to yeti or ibis.
    to tick all the box. Look like an evolution of ripmo and orbea rallon.

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    damn spaniards

  8. #8
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    Hopefully my 'R' with Fox 36 and DPX2 (an awesome shock - I already have one on my Mojo3) arrives this week. Ill be able to provide some feedback on feel and suspension. There is no info about about the rear suspensions AS or rate so hope its close the the Dune which is suitably progressive. If they are running a coil its likely to be progressive but Orbea offer the Rallon with a coil and its rather linear.... We will see ! PS: The geometry of these bikes is outstanding. Reason im buying is a test road the previous model Foxy in 27.5 and whilst its rear end was a little harsh you could throw the thing down and off anything and feel like a hero. So incredibly stable and safe to ride. Good bike for people like me who's ambitions generally exceed capabilities. :-)
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
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  9. #9
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    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-img_4498.jpgNew mondraker foxy carbon 29-img_4497.jpg

    I have one in da house.
    Will look to provide some feedback in a week if anyone considering one.
    This is the 'Race' (R).

    Conditions here are dry, hard, dusty and cool-cold. OEM rubber are Minion DHR2 WT 2.4 F and Agressor 2.3R.

    Have not weighed it but it feels about 14Kg out of the box.

    This is a Medium.

    Initial fit doesn't feel as enormous as the reach measurements suggest but the bike is seriously long. It doesn't fit on regular Thule roof racks that clamp to the downtube.

    Very nicely pre-assembled. Only need to remove protection, install handlebar, install front brake rotor and wheel, install saddle and tune to provide initial settings.
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
    Cracked Niner SIR
    Grove R.A.D
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  10. #10
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    Very nice, a sweet looking bike indeed. Color me jealous.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  11. #11
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    I have one in da house.
    Will look to provide some feedback in a week if anyone considering one.


    Initial impressions:

    This bike is super easy to ride.

    Im 175cm and reasonably average in arm and leg lengths. The medium fits perfectly.

    The short top tube allows you to drop the bars so you can get a more trail/xc position on the bike if you want to - more on that later.

    Initial pedalling with the suspension inactive - ie: smooth conditions- is super responsive. It looks to have very high anti squat in the early part of travel.

    At close to 14kg the bike to me is very heavy but with its steep seat angle seems rather easy to accelerate quickly for that sort of weight

    So first trails I rode were local moderate tech trails. Traction on climbing is astonishing. Compared to a 2.8 clad mojo3 it would easily equal that traction with the 2.3 agressor. This isnít a tyre thing, its the ultimate sensitivity of the rear end on bigger blocky steps and chunk when climbing.

    Initially the rear end feels firm and supported then easily reacts to larger movements maintaining grip. I ended up running around 1 more click rebound than recommend by Mondraker and set pressure for my weight exactly as per their chart - 155 psi.

    Is it nimble and playful and poppy? No. This thing is a trail soaker !
    Whilst super and suprisingly easy to move around in very tight stuff including climbs- no lofting of front wheel, no washing out - it still seems to place you perfectly in the bike so you donít really need to muscle it around going up.

    All good so far!

    Going down and jumping: so easy and safe. Hit the local gap without even bothering to punch it and its stable and level on take off and landing. You hardly need to move at all. Point and shoot!

    With its rather linear ( slightly progressive then regressive) rear end I thought it might bottom out easily. So far have not done that but can easily use all the travel. Perhaps the shock has been tuned with spacers to my weight- say 74kg.

    With the smammer offset it feels a bit that it just wants to motor on straight. But with the wide bars and short stem it responds quickly if you wanna change that!

    Negative:

    Calves clip the swing arm/pivots. You need to get used to that. Bit irritating.

    Muck in suspension? Dunno. Its dry here and no issues so far

    Bloody heavy. Wheels getting swapped and a few other things. Oem kit otherwise is great.
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
    Cracked Niner SIR
    Grove R.A.D
    Lynskey R230

  12. #12
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    Really dig this machine and would like to spend some time on one.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professed View Post
    I have one in da house.
    Will look to provide some feedback in a week if anyone considering one.


    Initial impressions:

    This bike is super easy to ride.

    Im 175cm and reasonably average in arm and leg lengths. The medium fits perfectly.

    The short top tube allows you to drop the bars so you can get a more trail/xc position on the bike if you want to - more on that later.

    Initial pedalling with the suspension inactive - ie: smooth conditions- is super responsive. It looks to have very high anti squat in the early part of travel.

    At close to 14kg the bike to me is very heavy but with its steep seat angle seems rather easy to accelerate quickly for that sort of weight

    So first trails I rode were local moderate tech trails. Traction on climbing is astonishing. Compared to a 2.8 clad mojo3 it would easily equal that traction with the 2.3 agressor. This isnít a tyre thing, its the ultimate sensitivity of the rear end on bigger blocky steps and chunk when climbing.

    Initially the rear end feels firm and supported then easily reacts to larger movements maintaining grip. I ended up running around 1 more click rebound than recommend by Mondraker and set pressure for my weight exactly as per their chart - 155 psi.

    Is it nimble and playful and poppy? No. This thing is a trail soaker !
    Whilst super and suprisingly easy to move around in very tight stuff including climbs- no lofting of front wheel, no washing out - it still seems to place you perfectly in the bike so you donít really need to muscle it around going up.

    All good so far!

    Going down and jumping: so easy and safe. Hit the local gap without even bothering to punch it and its stable and level on take off and landing. You hardly need to move at all. Point and shoot!

    With its rather linear ( slightly progressive then regressive) rear end I thought it might bottom out easily. So far have not done that but can easily use all the travel. Perhaps the shock has been tuned with spacers to my weight- say 74kg.

    With the smammer offset it feels a bit that it just wants to motor on straight. But with the wide bars and short stem it responds quickly if you wanna change that!

    Negative:

    Calves clip the swing arm/pivots. You need to get used to that. Bit irritating.

    Muck in suspension? Dunno. Its dry here and no issues so far

    Bloody heavy. Wheels getting swapped and a few other things. Oem kit otherwise is great.
    So the Foxy 29er has a regressive LR?

    I like the idea of this bike with the coil option, but the rear suspension leverage ratio needs to be progressive to work well with a coil imo.

    Also tell me about the calves hitting?

    Please advise.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    Hi Suns, The XR comes with a Coil as OEM but I can't see why a rider would want one. With the DPX2 Mondraker look to have tuned it so that it doesnt blow through the travel (given the rear linkage is progressive-regressive). I havnt had the chance to pull the shock down and check if any spacers have been used but probably won't bother.

    Its hard to share the feel of a suspension in writing but I have ridden a coil on my Bronson for a while and that sort of feel is well replicated by the DPX2 on this bike. The Bronson has a bit of a soft wollow in its rear, this bike has nothing of that. The suspension is very reactive to larger blocks, steps and tech whilst still sitting up well and remaining nippy to pedal. I can't see the need for a coil in my few ride experiences to date - will get it out on some bigger stuff next weekend and comment. (note if you do bike park then my experiences won't be of any value to you as our gaps and jumps are no larger than about 1.5m at the most)

    To answer your calf question: The top pivot of the upper link just clips my calves. Im no popeye but i noticed it initially. After two rides and around 30km of experience I started to adjust and didnt notice it as much.
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
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  15. #15
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    Thanks Professed!

    How did you determine the LR? Could you just tell as soon as you rode it? Did you read it somewhere?

    I'm drawn to the coil shock, and the color of that model, but I want a bike with no compromises.

    Thanks again.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  16. #16
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    Does the bike comfortably fit a 2.5 Aggressor in the rear?

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Thanks Professed!

    How did you determine the LR? Could you just tell as soon as you rode it? Did you read it somewhere?

    I'm drawn to the coil shock, and the color of that model, but I want a bike with no compromises.

    Thanks again.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Here: Linkage Design: Mondraker

    And yes, this would be a terrible leverage curve for a coil shock.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  18. #18
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    2.6 to 2.3 to 2.6... if you say such a small curve is bad for coil, I'd question if you think that coil for forks is even worse. The Foxy 29's curve will enhance midstroke support, keeping the bike riding high and firm where you are likely pedaling. The rubber bumper isn't modeled into the forces chart, but that thing is pretty hard to compress (doing well to prevent absolutely full travel usage), giving coils significant end-stroke ramp that's comparable to an air shock.

    I wouldn't judge this as "terrible" for a coil. I'd just predict that it allows them to design the frame with extra low static BB, and give a rider a sense of consistent predictability. 29ers cover ground efficiently, and a stiff spring feels less draggy when accelerating, compared to a typical hammock curve from a progressive setup (hammock curve = wallow/plushness). If you tune the progressive setups to use full travel, you tend to run a lot of sag and blow through travel, relying on the wall of the ramp-up; when you've sagged to 35-40%, 70% is your midstroke which is about when the wall starts. This bike's support starts fairly immediately and, with proper spring rate tuned to bottom out, I wouldn't be surprised if you had 25% sag. I question the point of deep sag--if you don't ride in a manner where you demand a lot of "negative" travel, what is that 35-40% of travel used for, if it's not wasted? I imagine you don't want suspension to extend deeply into holes, preferring to skip along the tops.

    I find linear to be fast and progressive to be plush and poppy. For such a long big-wheeled bike, fast sounds like the name of the game. The amount of travel by itself offers plushness, and a firm spring setup makes it accelerate more responsively. Switch to air if you need tuning to handle big hits. Might be better off looking for a short travel compact wheelbase bike with small wheels if you want playful, poppy, but relatively plush (e.g. old Rocky Mtn Thunderbolt BC). In other words, this is more low flying enduro race bike (e.g. Yeti SB) than a jump-boosting FR/bike park bike (e.g. SC Nomad).

  19. #19
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    All good info, but I'm not certain I have the knowledge or skill to make sense of it all.

    What I want is the best bike for tons of darn rough natural trails, plus significant drops thrown in (I do 6' ers to flat now, but am progressing steadily). Also needs to work very well at the bike park once a year or so.

    It's hard to top the Yeti 5.5 I'm on now. I'm drawn to the Mondraker for several reasons: coil shock from the factory, forward geometry giving me the long reach I crave, aesthetically pleasing and the paint scheme on the XR rocks, and very unique around here.

    But if the bike doesn't actually work better and result in me climbing more efficiently, descending chunkier and steeper lines, feeling more confident and capable and even fresh all around, then I don't want to change bikes. I want real improvement. Not to just buy a bike just cause.

  20. #20
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    Also, I've read a fair bit of Antonio's stuff, and I think it's awesome that he provides it.

    But when I first encountered it I guess I thought that one could just choose the best suspension design and be done with it, but it's much more complex than that and to top it off, he use to really knock linear leverage ratios like my SB5.5, when in fact these designs are some of the fastest around.

    Furthermore Avalanche mentioned to me once that the conclusions are often incorrect as the manufacturers commonly use doctored photos for press releases making the pivot points inaccurate enough to effect results.

    So I enjoy looking at them, but I'm not sure I can draw any conclusions from it.

  21. #21
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    This would be a side-grade, mainly for reach, water bottle in front triangle, and other creature comforts. The Yeti SB55 is already highly optimized for natural trails, efficiently climbing and riding DH fast. Make the Yeti more linear to further optimize it, at cost of big air capability. You can do a coil on a Yeti as much as this can do coil. Drops, especially to flat, have their landings stuck better on linear suspension, since progressive setups threaten to buck you. I'll just add that longer chainstays pushes the bike towards the natural trails end of the spectrum even further, which is a plus for the Yeti (well, not much in the SB55's case, as it's 437 vs the Foxy 29's 435).

  22. #22
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    ninjichor - you nailed it with your description.

    Just because YT/Specialized run progressive rear ends doesnt mean its the solution to all our riding requirements.

    Yeti have successfully used a very linear system for many years on their SB range and noticeably have only used air shocks as they are so well suited to such systems.

    I think Mondraker have tuned the rear end really well for the intended use - technical trail and capable descending on rough terrain. I don't think this bike is designed for bike park but can't see why you couldnt use it for that purpose.

    I don't have much to compare it to but my much loved mojo3 with DPX2 is (according to the charts) slightly more progressive at the end of stroke but I blow through that shock very easily. No sign of that at all with the Mondy.

    I have only ridden and SB5 and this is not the same. The geometry very much directs how this bike feels. Its just increadibly stable

    i meant to say earlier that you can set the bike up almost XC so you get the most out of climbing as when you descend it take care of everything. I found myself bombing through steps and junk that usually has me out hanging off the back but this time with the dropper fully up and simply sitting central in the bike. so easy !

    I have yet to try anyting but OEM tyres - the 2.3 Agressor has plenty of clearance. I think the 2.5 should be OK but can't confirm at this stage without testing. I have a 2.5 DHF WT ( my all time favorite ) on its way....
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    I wouldn't judge this as "terrible" for a coil. I'd just predict that it allows them to design the frame with extra low static BB, and give a rider a sense of consistent predictability. 29ers cover ground efficiently, and a stiff spring feels less draggy when accelerating, compared to a typical hammock curve from a progressive setup (hammock curve = wallow/plushness). If you tune the progressive setups to use full travel, you tend to run a lot of sag and blow through travel, relying on the wall of the ramp-up; when you've sagged to 35-40%, 70% is your midstroke which is about when the wall starts. This bike's support starts fairly immediately and, with proper spring rate tuned to bottom out, I wouldn't be surprised if you had 25% sag. I question the point of deep sag--if you don't ride in a manner where you demand a lot of "negative" travel, what is that 35-40% of travel used for, if it's not wasted? I imagine you don't want suspension to extend deeply into holes, preferring to skip along the tops.
    It's a matter of safety. With progressiveness on the biggest hits you'll slowly bang into the end of the shock/hardware vs. with no progressiveness you will slam into it and tear metal in a catastrophic failure. This Foxy goes slightly progressive, then it goes digressive through the travel. It'll kinda work with an air shock, but a coil shock? Yes, that's a terrible leverage curve. You are acting as if the entire curve has to be all whacked out like crazy progressive over the whole stroke going into infinity. It doesn't, I've ridden those overly-progressive bikes and they get ultra-harsh deep into the travel and of course you never really use all the travel unless you set it to sag at 50% or more, either way it usually works like crap, but the point is you don't have to make those kinds of sacrifices these days. You don't have to buy a Foxy, there are actually bikes out there with well designed leverage curves. This does not appear to be one of them. Figuring out the leverage curves is not rocket science and Antonio has made some pretty reasonable arguments on how he comes up with them. Could some slight differences throw off the kinematics? Sure, but Antonio said he screens for it and only works with what appears to be the actual end product in enough resolution. I don't buy that all these manufacturers are photo-shopping all of their bikes, I do think that it may not provide enough resolution for shock tuning like Craig at Avalanche does and I know he contracts someone to do this work for the bikes he tunes, plus, he's running a business and has to bet the reputation on it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  24. #24
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    You will know of Cesar Rojo from Unno. As we know he started out as the engineer behind most of what Mondraker does today and he continues to use a progressive-regressive leverage curve on his bikes.

    I was rather concerned seeing the leverage curve but given I had the bike the day Antonio released it I just ignored it and took the things out for some rides.

    I have zero concerns about its performance and don't think any further progression is required for technical trail riding. Perhaps for bike park but then you would buy a YT Capra or such for that sort of riding I would expect...
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
    Cracked Niner SIR
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professed View Post

    I have zero concerns about its performance and don't think any further progression is required for technical trail riding. Perhaps for bike park but then you would buy a YT Capra or such for that sort of riding I would expect...
    You wouldn't take a 6" enduro bike to the park? Why not? That's usually around the cutoff where that kind of bike tends to work really well, vs. people bringing XC bikes and the sort.

    IME, there is no "magic", everything happens for a reason. Leverage curves and suspension kinematics can be extrapolated. It's not some big mystery or conspiracy as it seemed to be 15 years ago. There are a lot of companies that steadfastily cling to outdated ideas and designs, like Specialized, but that doesn't mean that you can't see these for what they are if you are a discerning consumer.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  26. #26
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    [QUOTE=Jayem;13769107]You wouldn't take a 6" enduro bike to the park? Why not? That's usually around the cutoff where that kind of bike tends to work really well, vs. people bringing XC bikes and the sort.

    Agree with you regarding no magic 100%. If you are the XSquare One engineer or salesman than it most certainly is!

    Even gain has a related loss in some respects.

    Please donít get me wrong on the capabilities of this bike. I would definitely take it to a bike park but our bike parks are not like say Whistler. If that were your thing I would buy something more suitable like a Nomad/YT.
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
    Ibis Mojo3 (L)
    Orbea Alma 29 Rigid
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  27. #27
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    Not having ridden a Yeti 5.5 I canít comment exactly but looking at it from data at hand I wouldnít change bikes. The SB5.5 can be tuned to be a seriously capable bike.

  28. #28
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    Stick to the fundamental concepts, rather than trying to reason through "appeal to authority" and anecdote.

    What kind of terrain do you ride? How do you want to ride it? What kind of bike and rider? These are the fundamental questions which you can design for. You can be better prepared for getting specific results, if you aim for them. Safety through well-executed handling of "the 95%", rather than comforting your fears and insecurities, such as feeling tired or sweat in your eyes and a desire for the suspension to save you.

    A progressive bike sagged to 50% might be the right bike for a certain rider and terrain. The same exact bike with a different spring rate (sagged to 25%) might be the right setup for another certain rider and terrain. There's only so much you can predict from the bike itself; judging it to be terrible is taking generalizations a bit far.

    On a bike, sag is considered to be "negative travel". Essentially, it allows the wheel to follow the terrain through deep gaps. This is vital for vehicles like trophy trucks, since they're continuing to accelerate and need the wheel to be on the ground, rather than still in the air. On a bike, you can "trade" negative travel for more positive travel. You can make this compromise *if* you plan on just straight lining through deep chunder and expecting the traction to only happen when your tires are touching the tops. Really now, 50% sag? What's left of the 150mm of rear travel after that. A small fraction of that half, if you consider that the plush zone only goes so far before you hit that supportive wall of ramp up. I'd argue that linear is super easy to ride, while you have to be on your game on the progressive setup, since it'll buck you if you ride "dead sailor". On XC bikes, people set 20-25% sag, so they're still getting up to 75-80mm travel on their 100mm bike. If you're running 40% sag on a 150mm bike, you have 90mm travel left, but that 60mm used for negative travel plays into how squishy the pedal bob is compared to the XC bike's 20-25mm. A 150mm bike sagged to 25% has 112.5mm travel left.

    In Antonio's analysis, the forces curve is as close to an end product simulation you can get, if only he modeled the springs accurately. Looks like he used an EVOL air can in this model, rather than coil. Coil would've had a higher bottom out rate if sagged similarly, believe it or not.

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    Antonio tunes the curves to match according to sag. How many people tune their shocks over time is to tweak it for full travel use, sag % be damned (e.g. sag used only as a starting guideline). If you aligned a spring rates side by side, based on tuning to use full travel, you'd see just how much more mid-stroke support this bike has over progressive setups. On top of that, you won't have to run low rebound damping (vs being critically damped) to prevent packing up with the linear suspension.
    Last edited by ninjichor; 08-07-2018 at 07:57 AM.

  29. #29
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    Yeah good appraisal. The engineers certainly look to know what they are doing.

    Good to see an alternate approach to the current Ďmake it super progressiveí approach by many.

    Looking forward to pushing the bike harder on tougher terrain this weekend to see how this applies itself.

  30. #30
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    Super progressive bikes are what the cool kids ride, literally. When I ride a progressive bike, I look for creative ways to utilize the energy it kicks back out from fast rebound (pop). From simply kicking it out to the side, to getting more airborne, it gives me extra opportunity to have fun. Worry less about PRs and more about most smiles per miles. It's not inefficient, if you judge by how it pedals on the pavement, but since it seems to want to leave the ground more often and has geo to make getting sideways easy (e.g. short chainstays), it's at a disadvantage in terms of PR-setting "efficiency". I crashed very often on them; the act of crashing often made me more efficient at brushing off falls as if nothing happened. Still, it's a hoot.

    People can say that they're not like that, maybe saying they're too old. I think they're selling themselves short. I find that I change style according to the bike I ride. The same route will be a uniquely different experience, if I ride a diff bike on it. It's like girls putting on different outfits: one set might make em feel more elegant, smooth, precise, and flowing. One might make em more explosive, high tempo, and likely to take the lead (or eagerly chasing/following an experienced leader). Another set might make em more creative, more adventurous, more avante garde, taking in the environment and letting it inspire them. Plenty of others... rather not try and judge any as being superior/inferior.

    One you ride loose and wild, another you ride with a calculated precision. The latter sounds more like Greg Minnaar. Might seem boring to watch, compared to other riders, but very respectable still. I would like to see something with longer chainstays like the Pole Machine, for this style of riding, personally.

  31. #31
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    My personal experience with my SB5.5 having a linear LR combined with an air shock, is that it is essentially ideal.

    However part of my interest in the Foxy 29er is the coil shock (not too mention the nice color scheme that comes in that model.

    Combining a linear ratio, with a linear coil shock, is a bad mismatch.

    The 5.5 replacement, the SB150 is supposed to drop within weeks, so i'm going to wait for that. I feel that yeti won't place the wrong product on the bike, for street cred, if it isn't right for the application.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  32. #32
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    I'm curious what all these "super progressive bikes" are. Seems you are lumping everything else into one category to rationalize your purchase.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  33. #33
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    I'm going to be demo one of these at the end of August, can't wait.

    I'm hesitating between this, transition sentinel and a GG Smash for my next bike. I know the GGs very well, and demoed the Sentinel in Sedona, and loved it. The comparison with the foxy should be interesting.
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  34. #34
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    I have a mate who recently bought a sentinel. Hoping to review them back to back soon. I expect both to be rather similar in feel and performance.

  35. #35
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    But Foxy is soooo much sexier!!!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professed View Post
    I have a mate who recently bought a sentinel. Hoping to review them back to back soon. I expect both to be rather similar in feel and performance.
    I don't know about that. I rode the Sentinel, and it felt very plush and planted. I expect the Foxy to ride higher in his travel and have a better overall dynamic. The Sentinel may be more of a mini-DH.

    What are your thoughts on the cable routing under the BB? I'm mildly OCD when it comes to bikes, that may drive me crazy.
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  37. #37
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    Maybe - I havn't ridden the Sentinel yet so will have to see !

    The foxy does generally ride 'high' - as earlier comments by other have clarified you don't need to run much sag and the initial progressiveness supports the rear end really well. Correctly set up though it is not overly firm nor harsh. I have seen reports of the 27.5" 2108 being 'overly firm'. Matter of taste too I guess.

    Because of that later regression it does becomes a rock munching monster. It moves through the full range of travel easily. I have only ridden trail bikes to date so to me this bike is on another level in terms of absorbtion capability.

    The cable routing isn't an issue so far but there isn't any mud around here. Leaves and sticks occasionally get caught i the rear shock shroud and i don't clip my calves on the pivots anymore.

    still happy with it so far !
    Mondraker Foxy 29 (M)
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  38. #38
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    99% sure I'm ordering a Mondraker frame set in November when they are available.

    They will have 3 framesets available (I spoke to the importer):

    1) Yellow one with the DPX2.
    2) Blue one with the X2 Coil.
    3) Black one with the Monarch.

    If anyone orders the black one, and would like to swap out their Monarch for the coil shock I'll be getting on the blue one, let's talk.

    I spoke to Qarv Imports a lot, the guy I spoke to is a Pro Enduro racer and rides a Mondraker. I told him the charts say the bike is real linear/ regressive and it needs an air shock and his response was he smashes his Mondrakers's very hard, with coil shocks, and it's real hard to get them to bottom. So I don't know.

    That said, I prefer the pedaling platform of the air shocks (and the lower weight) for All Mountain riding so that's what I'd like on mine.

    Professed, I'd appreciate any input you could provide on your Foxy 29.

  39. #39
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    Hmm, you probably talked to Austen then He's a ripper indeed. He's a whole touch faster than me, but I got to bottom it out while hucking to flat at high speeds, a handful of times, on the air DPX2. I just demoed the RR this weekend, it's an incredibly fast bike. It wasn't a hard bottom out, but I did use all the travel.

    The bike stays very high in its travel though, on more regular circumstances.

    Where are you ordering from? My bike shop told me they were readily available? But maybe he got confused?
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  40. #40
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    In my experience, coils tend to be extremely hard to bottom out, compared to air. When I last did a calculation, for 30% sag (shock rate curve: regressive to ~25%, then progressive), I later convinced myself that I was oversprung based on riding experience.

    The bottom out bumper might be a bit firm for my weight perhaps. I was recommended the current spring rate by numerous susp experts, but can reach similar sag with a -50 lb lighter spring with a few turns of preload. I can definitely feel the bottom out bumper with the lighter spring, but never really felt it actually come to a mechanical stop like it does with air. Upping or decreasing preload didn't affect bottom out, but made the initial stroke saggy and pedal strike prone if I didn't preload.

    I ended up just riding it with the recommended spring, saying that coils are like singlespeeds, that you always got the wrong spring rate, and thinking back to how some brands are offering in-between spring rates and how marginal of an improvement they'd be. I got used to how it ran. The other setup sounded good on paper, with firmer early stroke for pedaling efficiency and plush midstroke, but I prefer the more consistent quality travel of the firmer spring. I might try a -25 lb spring if the shock had a hydraulic bottom out and if the spring didn't cost as much as a Ti one, as the sudden spring rate increase of the bumper was disturbing.

  41. #41
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    On Edit: Yes, it was Austen.

    He said he had only bottomed his personal 27.5 Mondraker with a coil 2x, and he told me that he slams things really hard. But that he was also 150#s whereas I weigh 180.

    If I had my choice, I'd have the Monarch air shock. As it sits, I'll likely have the coil and will see what I think, keep it as a spare, use it for Angel Fire, etc...

    It appears my only option for ordering the frame is a local Mondraker dealer, frankly I'm just not use to paying retail, for anything. They are a great shop, but the frame would cost me after taxes about $1K more than a new SB130, for instance. I'm still struggling with that.

    PS. Pretty sure I'm ordering this frameset this week. I'm struggling on choosing the yellow with the air shock, or the blue with the coil. After staring at them for half the day I went from a 'no way' on the yellow to, 'pretty sure I'd do that!'
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 08-27-2018 at 07:33 PM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    In my experience, coils tend to be extremely hard to bottom out, compared to air. When I last did a calculation, for 30% sag (shock rate curve: regressive to ~25%, then progressive), I later convinced myself that I was oversprung based on riding experience.

    The bottom out bumper might be a bit firm for my weight perhaps. I was recommended the current spring rate by numerous susp experts, but can reach similar sag with a -50 lb lighter spring with a few turns of preload. I can definitely feel the bottom out bumper with the lighter spring, but never really felt it actually come to a mechanical stop like it does with air. Upping or decreasing preload didn't affect bottom out, but made the initial stroke saggy and pedal strike prone if I didn't preload.

    I ended up just riding it with the recommended spring, saying that coils are like singlespeeds, that you always got the wrong spring rate, and thinking back to how some brands are offering in-between spring rates and how marginal of an improvement they'd be. I got used to how it ran. The other setup sounded good on paper, with firmer early stroke for pedaling efficiency and plush midstroke, but I prefer the more consistent quality travel of the firmer spring. I might try a -25 lb spring if the shock had a hydraulic bottom out and if the spring didn't cost as much as a Ti one, as the sudden spring rate increase of the bumper was disturbing.
    I'm not certain about your calculations, but coil shocks have a linear spring rate. Meaning they don't get harder to compress as they get lower, just add another 300# for another inch.

    Where-as an air spring is progressive and they get harder and harder as the air volume decreases. Maybe it takes 150# for the first inch, but 400# for the 3rd inch.

    When you have a ratio that appears to be linear (although Qarv said the Montrakers are actually quite Progressive, not the first time I've seen experts disagree with Antonio's blog) you don't get the soft on the top compliance combined with a ton of frame/ spine protecting bottom out resistance.

    Old dirt bikes (pre 1981) did not have linkages to make them progressive, and they sucked with their coil shocks. You could either make the suspension work well over the chatter (soft), or you could make them work well for the big jumps (hard), but never both, until they added Pro-Link/ Full Floater/ etc... to give the needed progressiveness.

    Same reason that KTM's PDS, non-linkage rear suspension worked so poorly for years.
    Now if KTM threw an air shock on the back they could go back to PDS and save a LOT of weight on both the shock and the linkage.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It appears my only option for ordering the frame is a local Mondraker dealer, frankly I'm just not use to paying retail, for anything. They are a great shop, but the frame would cost me after taxes about $1K more than a new SB130, for instance. I'm still struggling with that.
    Yep, I'm in the same boat. I Love the bike, but I can't really justify dropping that much money into a frame... Even if it rides amazingly well.
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  44. #44
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    So I'm buying a Foxy 29 and have decided that I'm happy with either the yellow or blue frame color, the price difference is not the factor. I want to choose the one with the best shock for rowdy trail riding and one bike park trip every other year. Heck we even have a lift going up an hour from my house that I plan to visit many times per year.

    The DPX2 LV Evol vs. the DHX2 coil.

    Which one are you guys running on your Foxy 29 and what do you think about it? Which way would you go?

    Thanks

    Thanks!

    On Edit, I'm going with the air shock. Read a million reviews and info and I just can't see a real advantage for me using the coil. Seems like a lot of downside. I wish the air shock offering was an X2, but oh well.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 08-28-2018 at 04:29 AM.

  45. #45
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    Yeah, i Was about to say. I rode it in White Ranch (close to Golden if you know the Front Range area) and Winter Park, not trying to go slow (the opposite actually). I didn't have any complaint about the rear shock, the DPX2. The suspension is dialed!
    I matched all my PR's in White Ranch, after work (when I usually am terrible), and was a lot faster than my PRs on the park day. I usually ride a coil shock, so I don't see that as being too much of a factor . I ride both of these areas VERY often.
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  46. #46
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    I now have a Foxy 29 XR frameset on order. It's scheduled to arrive in November.

    I will be selling the stock coil shock brand new when it arrives (I already bought a Superdeluxe RC3 for it) so for those that are coil curious, it'll be here.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  47. #47
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    Just placed my order for an R model. Can't wait for it to show up.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professed View Post
    Maybe - I havn't ridden the Sentinel yet so will have to see !

    The foxy does generally ride 'high' - as earlier comments by other have clarified you don't need to run much sag and the initial progressiveness supports the rear end really well. Correctly set up though it is not overly firm nor harsh. I have seen reports of the 27.5" 2108 being 'overly firm'. Matter of taste too I guess.

    Because of that later regression it does becomes a rock munching monster. It moves through the full range of travel easily. I have only ridden trail bikes to date so to me this bike is on another level in terms of absorbtion capability.

    The cable routing isn't an issue so far but there isn't any mud around here. Leaves and sticks occasionally get caught i the rear shock shroud and i don't clip my calves on the pivots anymore.

    still happy with it so far !
    I've spoken to Austen at Qarv, the importers for Mondraker. Austen races the Pro Enduro class. He told me that the bike works beautifully at 35% sag and that's how it needs to be set up. I asked like 3x just for clarification and he was quite adamant.

    FYI

    PSI, I am not a fan of that cable routing.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by xavierp View Post
    Yeah, i Was about to say. I rode it in White Ranch (close to Golden if you know the Front Range area) and Winter Park, not trying to go slow (the opposite actually). I didn't have any complaint about the rear shock, the DPX2. The suspension is dialed!
    I matched all my PR's in White Ranch, after work (when I usually am terrible), and was a lot faster than my PRs on the park day. I usually ride a coil shock, so I don't see that as being too much of a factor . I ride both of these areas VERY often.
    That's a heck of an endorsement.

  50. #50
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    Do any of you Foxy 29 owners know if your shock mounts have roller bearing mounts in them?

    I had great luck with this mod on my Yeti, and several of the reviews I have read on 2017 Mondraker's complain explicitly about the stiction in the rear shock but one mentioned this had been changed for 2018 and up.

    Please advise.

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  52. #52
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    Just got done with a demo week with one of these in the RR big bird flavor. Was a nice bike, was pretty much a 1 trick pony for me though. Fast in a straight line. Other than that a pretty boring ride. Would make a amazing race bike, but as your only bike unless all you car about was speed at all times then it was pretty boring, like in the back seat on a ride boring. The rear tire clearance was too close for me as well. With a 2.3 aggressor it sat WAY too close for comfort to the little fender to keep suspension clean. A bigger 2.5 and a slight bit of mud and you would be in trouble quick. I live in colorado springs Colorado where we have quite a bit of decomposed granite ( AKA gravel) and the smaller tire was bringing little rocks around I could hear hit the cross brace. Over all a OK bike, I would own one for just a race bike, but at the MSRP of a Yeti which is already above 98% of the industry and only 1 local shop for support I would say I have to pass.

  53. #53
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    Thanks for the feedback. I think it's a love it or hate it kind of bike because it's at an extreme.

    Would love to hear your opinions on climbing and turning.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    Just got done with a demo week with one of these in the RR big bird flavor. Was a nice bike, was pretty much a 1 trick pony for me though. Fast in a straight line. Other than that a pretty boring ride. Would make a amazing race bike, but as your only bike unless all you car about was speed at all times then it was pretty boring, like in the back seat on a ride boring. The rear tire clearance was too close for me as well. With a 2.3 aggressor it sat WAY too close for comfort to the little fender to keep suspension clean. A bigger 2.5 and a slight bit of mud and you would be in trouble quick. I live in colorado springs Colorado where we have quite a bit of decomposed granite ( AKA gravel) and the smaller tire was bringing little rocks around I could hear hit the cross brace. Over all a OK bike, I would own one for just a race bike, but at the MSRP of a Yeti which is already above 98% of the industry and only 1 local shop for support I would say I have to pass.
    I don't know my good man, I had quite a lot of fun to throw that bike sideways at Winter Park Maybe it suits me. Not the MOST fun bike, I agree, especially compared to say, a Sentinel, but still OK given its length.

    Ride soon?
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  55. #55
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    I rode one in Vail at the Outlier demo yesterday and really liked it. I expected it to be too long and hard to turn. Instead it was about the best handling bike I've ridden. There was amazing stability that invited me to go faster because it was matched with superior cornering confidence. It completely railed tight corners and quick back and forth situations. You absolutely had to plan ahead for the tight corners but when you did it turned perfectly. I was really surprised but it worked great downhill for me. Unfortunately I didn't really do any climbing and I didn't love the rear suspension. It wasn't plush with a DPX2 and my body weight which is what they recommended. The rear tire clearance was also limited so I couldn't see running a 2.5. Now I just wish their pricing made more sense. The frame is more expensive than the most coveted brands when they are a fringe player at best.
    2 wheels

  56. #56
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    Thanks for the review. Good data point.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  57. #57
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    This is one of the sexiset full suspension frames I have ever seen.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux View Post
    This is one of the sexiset full suspension frames I have ever seen.
    I'd be lying if I didn't say that the looks of the bike, were a factor for me.

  59. #59
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    Iíve had the R version for about a week now and Iíve upgraded just about everything. Itís amazing so far.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-d18bca37-0d75-4b71-999e-231a9024edb3.jpg

    Iím curious to where others are setting their rear sag with air shocks. I hope to upgrade the shock down the road as well. The DPX2 Performance feels decent but I know it could be better.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Iíve had the R version for about a week now and Iíve upgraded just about everything. Itís amazing so far.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Iím curious to where others are setting their rear sag with air shocks. I hope to upgrade the shock down the road as well. The DPX2 Performance feels decent but I know it could be better.
    I'll have a brand new Foxy XR next week and will be selling the unused DHX2 coil shock.
    Any interest?

    Qarv, the Mondraker distributor, told me the bike likes 35% sag. I'll still start with 30% myself.

    Tell us more about the bike, and also what you don't like about the stock air shock.

    PS. Nice cranks Bro!

    Thx

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 10-24-2018 at 09:13 AM.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I'll have a brand new Foxy XR next week and will be selling the unused DHX2 coil shock.
    Any interest?

    Qarv, the Mondraker distributor, told me the bike likes 35% sag. I'll still start with 30% myself.

    Tell us more about the bike, and also what you don't like about the stock air shock.

    PS. Nice cranks Bro!

    Thx

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Iíll bullet the finer points:

    Downhill it is a rocket ship. Very stable but itís still maneuverable. It feels great in fast turns, even flat ones (no berm). The geometry feels spot on to me.

    It climbs better than expected. No need to mess with compression switches. Just motor and it goes. I donít find the front wandering or lifting in an unacceptable way. Itís no XC bike but itíll play uphill just fine.

    Slow pedally trails with lots of tight turns become laborious. Pedaling is nice and efficient but the bike needs to be leaned for good corner traction. Again, a steep hta XC bike is better here but Iíll deal with this compromise because itís so much fun everywhere else.

    The shock isnít all that bad but I have the 36 modified with the Vorsprung Luftkappe and the Avalanche cartridge and it just blows away anything Iíve ever ridden. Others that have ridden it are left with their jaw on the floor. Because of this Iím seeking similar performance from the back end. In the stock form itís very, very good. Iím going to keep fiddling with sag and rebound to see if I can make it even better. I believe Iím running less than 30% sag now. If I canít get what Iím looking for out of the DPX2 Iíll look for a Super Deluxe to get the Avalanche treatment as recommended by Craig from Avalanche.

    The internal routing of the rear brake line sucks from a replacement or maintenance standpoint. Itís only the chaistay that is tricky. The downtube routing is money. The cable and hose under the BB doesnít bother me, My Scott Genius has this and it was never an issue.

    The shock position is nothing to worry about, the fender does a fine job of keeping it clean enough. My only complaint on the fender is that it likes to trap dry leaves which make noise. The bike is very quite so this is noticeable.

    The chainstay protector does protect the chainstay well but itís loud AF. Like youíre hitting the CS with a hammer loud. I slapped a large Lizard Skins neoprene wrap on there and itís silent now.

    The rear tire clearance looks tight. Curious to hear what other will be able to fit. I really like the 2.3 Aggressor so Iíll keep in on there for awhile.

    The cranks are the best you can get, hands down. Very stiff and very light. More durable than carbon and Ti mutes some of the high frequency vibration. Price is the only downside.

    I donít think Iím interested in the coil shock. If I did more pure DH or park riding maybe but the air feels pretty good.
    Last edited by GearTech; 10-24-2018 at 03:31 PM.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Iíll bullet the finer points:

    Downhill it is a rocket ship. Very stable but itís still maneuverable. It feels great in fast turns, even flat ones (no berm). The geometry feels spot on to me.

    It climbs better than expected. No need to mess with compression switches. Just motor and it goes. I donít find the front wandering or lifting in an unacceptable way. Itís no XC bike but itíll play uphill just fine.

    Slow pedally trails with lots of tight turns become laborious. Pedaling is nice and efficient but the bike needs to be leaned for good corner traction. Again, a steep hta XC bike is better here but Iíll deal with this compromise because itís so much fun everywhere else.

    The shock isnít all that bad but I have the 36 modified with the Vorsprung Luftkappe and the Avalanche cartridge and it just blows away anything Iíve ever ridden. Others that have ridden it are left with their jaw on the floor. Because of this Iím seeking similar performance from the back end. In the stock form itís very, very good. Iím going to keep fiddling with sag and rebound to see if I can make it even better. I believe Iím running less than 30% sag now. If I canít get what Iím looking for out of the DPX2 Iíll look for a Super Deluxe to get the Avalanche treatment as recommended by Craig from Avalanche.

    The internal routing of the rear brake line sucks from a replacement or maintenance standpoint. Itís only the chaistay they is tricky. The downtube routing is money. The cable and hose under the BB doesnít bother me, My Scott Genius has this and it was never an issue.

    The shock position is nothing to worry about, the fender does a fine job of keeping it clean enough. My only complaint on the fender is that it likes to trap dry leaves which make noise. The bike is very quite so this is noticeable.

    The chainstay protector does protect the chainstay well but itís loud AF. Like youíre hitting the CS with a hammer loud. I slapped a large Lizard Skins neoprene wrap on there and itís silent now.

    The rear tire clearance looks tight. Curious to hear what other will be able to fit. I really like the 2.3 Aggressor so Iíll keep in on there for awhile.

    The cranks are the best you can get, hands down. Very stiff and very light. More durable than carbon and Ti muted some of the high frequency vibration.

    I donít think Iím interested in the coil shock. If I did more pure DH or park riding maybe but the air feels pretty good.
    That was a darn good review.

    Hopefully the maneuverability in tight slow conditions does not bother me too much. I do tend to lean my bike a lot under most conditions so maybe that will help.

    So you're saying the Ewing cranks you could actually feel a very real and positive difference in the flex?
    I have nice X01 cranks but was considering buying the Ewings if they provide definitive improvements.

    I won't own a bike that Craig @ Avy hasn't went through any longer so I feel ya. In fact he' s already done the suspension for my Foxy that I don't even have yet. However contrary to popular opinion, the coil shock option on this particular bike is well suited to chunder, roots, jagged trail conditions, and so on. It's not progressive enough for large drops or jumps. But it absolutely eats up rough trail conditions while maintaining mad traction and efficiency.

    What size lizard skin wrap did you buy? I'll get one coming asap.

    I'd be pretty annoyed if I can't fit a 2.4 tire on the rear of my Foxy comfortably.

    - take care

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  63. #63
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    I think a 2.4 will fit fine, that may be it though.

    The eeWings do make a noticeable improvement. No BS at all. I love them more than just about anything Iíve ever purchased. Theyíre right up there with the fork mods. Iím coming off SixC and XO1s for reference.

    Itís the Large Lizard Skins wrap. It fits perfectly.

    Iím sure the coil provides great traction. Iím not sure I want to add that much weight though. If I were racing Enduro very seriously I would go for it but this is my do-it-all bike now so Iím watching the grams closely.

  64. #64
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    Check out the other Mondraker thread for more info. http://forums.mtbr.com/custom-builde...r-1064499.html

    I'm running my rear shock at about 30% sag. I weight 160ish kitted, and have 150 psi in the shock with 11 clicks of rebound. The shock likes to be run soft for best performance.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    The eeWings do make a noticeable improvement. No BS at all. I love them more than just about anything Iíve ever purchased. Theyíre right up there with the fork mods. Iím coming off SixC and XO1s for reference.
    Damn you! I just bought some ungodly overpriced Eewing cranks. Sheesh.

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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    [...]So you're saying the Ewing cranks you could actually feel a very real and positive difference in the flex?
    I have nice X01 cranks but was considering buying the Ewings if they provide definitive improvements.

    I won't own a bike that Craig @ Avy hasn't went through any longer so I feel ya. In fact he' s already done the suspension for my Foxy that I don't even have yet. However contrary to popular opinion, the coil shock option on this particular bike is well suited to chunder, roots, jagged trail conditions, and so on. It's not progressive enough for large drops or jumps. But it absolutely eats up rough trail conditions while maintaining mad traction and efficiency.[...]
    A stiffer crank is more of a "feels" thing, a mental thing. When driving the bike feels more direct, the feedback encourages you to pedal more, as you feel more rewarded for the effort. It's quite promoted on the road side of things, though it doesn't prove to be any faster.

    Whose opinion was contrary to the coil? That's how linear suspension works.

    The take-away from what I've said: the firm mid-stroke + rubber bump stop accounts for more overall force absorption, compared to an air spring's softer mid-stroke and progressive end-stroke. The bottom-line was that coils are harder to bottom than expected.

    I highlighted an issue/exception with coil: firmer mid-stroke can fool people into thinking it's oversprung. I suspect that people go for softer springs in response to this feeling/feedback. They will then suffer from lower total force absorption (easier to bottom), and need preload to help maintain ride height (adds notable harshness off the top), just to get a softer mid-stroke feel that they unwittingly desired due to familiarity or expectations.

    I avoided saying that coil was progressive. I instead introduced fundamental concepts, like an additional rubber bump stop, hydraulic bottom out, and firm-midstroke, making coils jump/drop worthy. This may imply progressiveness, but I'd really not like to fight with the concrete biases people have with their oversimplified logic/rationale, where coil = linear (draws an illustration of coil's spring rate being a straight sloped line). If you put a complete coil shock in a "hand dyno" and compare, you'll see.

    The differences between coil and air pretty much boil down to weight, cost, consistency (including effects on rebound tuning), mid-stroke support, and the countless other small things like seal drag, frame fitment, maintenance, etc.

  67. #67
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    P.S. RockShox posted this illustration for their rear shocks, regarding coil vs air, which models in the effect of their rubber bumper on the spring rate curve:

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-bikerumor-suspension-setup-series-air-volume-adjustments-debonair.gif

    The bumper on the X-Fusion Vector I have is ~11mm (0.43", measured with caliper) thick, which seems to match up with the illustration, with how it affects the last 0.5" of the stroke. Seems to be shaped to be fairly compliant for the first half of its compression. The 11-6 uses a bumper about 2x the size, which is tapered for a smoother transition to get that "bottomless" feel.

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    Good info.

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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Damn you! I just bought some ungodly overpriced Eewing cranks. Sheesh.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    LOL seriously? You wonít be disappointed!

    I just finished a trail ride with some moderately bumpy downhill sections using 35% sag and itís money. The bike feels absolutely amazing. Traction is insane. If I were going to do a ride with large drops and big jumps where I was concerned with a more poppy feel and less chance of bottom out I would probably choose to run 30 to 32% sag. Although, this ride had some moderately big hits and Iím showing about 5 mm of travel being unused.

    *edited the spelling. Voice to text really butchered that one.
    Last edited by GearTech; 10-25-2018 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Fix spelling

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    Good to know on the sag and yes on the cranks. They'll be here Monday, which is likely the same day the frame arrives.
    1 year old set of 170mm GXP X01s for sale...

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    A 26oz water bottle fits with room to spare on the medium frame. Thatís nice!

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-549d4bda-6950-408a-8c0c-b717194a68d3.jpeg

  72. #72
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    Can anyone confirm what size volume spacer comes stock in the DPX2 on the Foxy 29?

    What about X2 fitment?
    Denver, CO

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Can anyone confirm what size volume spacer comes stock in the DPX2 on the Foxy 29?

    What about X2 fitment?
    They make an X2 that fits the bike, but you'd want to send it to Avalanche and have it set up for this LR.
    That's what I did but I used a Superdeluxe off of the '18 Spartan as it's a better shock. Craig installed 3 volume spacers as well as made valving adjustments to cope with the LR of the Foxy 29.
    It's cool to read that you like the bike so much. The SB150 is gone correct?

    Are you working with Golden Bike shop? Those guys are real fans of the Mondrakers.

    Tomorrow I get my first demo on a Mondraker at a local trail, which seems pointless because my own Foxy 29 should arrive no later than this Thursday.

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  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    They make an X2 that fits the bike, but you'd want to send it to Avalanche and have it set up for this LR.
    That's what I did but I used a Superdeluxe off of the '18 Spartan as it's a better shock. Craig installed 3 volume spacers as well as made valving adjustments to cope with the LR of the Foxy 29.
    It's cool to read that you like the bike so much. The SB150 is gone correct?

    Are you working with Golden Bike shop? Those guys are real fans of the Mondrakers.

    Tomorrow I get my first demo on a Mondraker at a local trail, which seems pointless because my own Foxy 29 should arrive no later than this Thursday.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Ya man I really really dig it. First bike I've ridden that felt like it has the efficiency of the Yeti. I think I'll have a video thrown together later but in short I really liked it. Stable, and deceivingly fast. I KOM'ed the top of white ranch on it yesterday and set a couple top 10's on longhorn. I ended up having to run the back end so stiff (about 22% sag) it felt a little too firm (if there's really such a thing) in the initial/mid stroke and I still had a bottom out hard enough to drop the chain. I'm in the process of looking into tuning now. I spoke with Fox this morning and the bike comes stock with a 0.6 volume spacer which is the largest that can fit in that size DPX2. I didn't realize there was an X2 available so I'll have to look more into that. The stock DPX2 has a light compression tune and they recommended re-valving for a firm tune. I'm not sure what kind of compromises that will make, I'm going to make some phone calls later. If I'm reassured enough that a tune will keep me from bottoming out and not mess with the initial/mid stroke too much I'll be ordering one.

    Does anyone have any photos of one with an X2? GBS told me they weren't an option due to clearance.
    Denver, CO

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Ya man I really really dig it. First bike I've ridden that felt like it has the efficiency of the Yeti. I think I'll have a video thrown together later but in short I really liked it. Stable, and deceivingly fast. I KOM'ed the top of white ranch on it yesterday and set a couple top 10's on longhorn. I ended up having to run the back end so stiff (about 22% sag) it felt a little too firm (if there's really such a thing) in the initial/mid stroke and I still had a bottom out hard enough to drop the chain. I'm in the process of looking into tuning now. I spoke with Fox this morning and the bike comes stock with a 0.6 volume spacer which is the largest that can fit in that size DPX2. I didn't realize there was an X2 available so I'll have to look more into that. The stock DPX2 has a light compression tune and they recommended re-valving for a firm tune. I'm not sure what kind of compromises that will make, I'm going to make some phone calls later. If I'm reassured enough that a tune will keep me from bottoming out and not mess with the initial/mid stroke too much I'll be ordering one.

    Does anyone have any photos of one with an X2? GBS told me they weren't an option due to clearance.
    SD, I'm going to send you a contact for my friend that owns Silverfish in the UK. He deals with Mondraker and all the Enduro/DH guy's so he knows exactly what going on and what they're doing to combat the LR
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  76. #76
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    Hard to imagine the X2 won't clear, since the XR version arrives with the DHX2, which I think is just an X2 but instead of the air can for a spring it has a (larger) steel spring.

    I know people not trying to sell me anything, that have said that the Foxy 29 climbs notably better than the SB130, while descending at least as well as the SB150.

    Lord I hope my RC3 just bolts right up, not sure what I'll do if by chance it doesn't.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Iíve had the R version for about a week now and Iíve upgraded just about everything. Itís amazing so far.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Iím curious to where others are setting their rear sag with air shocks. I hope to upgrade the shock down the road as well. The DPX2 Performance feels decent but I know it could be better.
    DUDE. That bike looks ridiculously sick! I gotta say though, if you're going to run THOSE cranks you need to at least upgrade your damper to the Grip2. It also sounds like Fox can re-valve the DPX2 and add an LSC adjustment for around $100. Looking into whether or not that's a better option than putting a 2019 X2 on it now.

    My plan is a similar build with polished hubs/spokes and possibly the same cranks all black/blue/polished.
    Denver, CO

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    SD, I'm going to send you a contact for my friend that owns Silverfish in the UK. He deals with Mondraker and all the Enduro/DH guy's so he knows exactly what going on and what they're doing to combat the LR
    Denver, CO

  79. #79
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    Was told that the X2 will fit by a dealer that contacted Mondraker on this exact question.
    °Geaux Tigers! - °Visca el BarÁa!

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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheezwhip View Post
    Was told that the X2 will fit by a dealer that contacted Mondraker on this exact question.
    great thanks!
    Denver, CO

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    Streetdoctor, I'm a 29er guy and it sounds like you are as well.

    However it's worth noting that the Foxy 29 is positioned for the hard trail/ light enduro part of the spectrum. This is reflected in the higher BB height, as well the linear- regressive LR and shock choice on their premium version. Those suspension choices are designed to make trail chatter all but disappear, but it appears to be lacking in stock form for major obstacles. Honestly your description of bottoming on 1' drops is very concerning to me (It's probably not those little drops, but the repeated successive hits that bottomed it, which reflects a lot on the shock itself) cause I'll hit a couple of 6' to flat here and there and endless chunder and 1-2'ers. The reported traits of the Foxy 29 appear otherwise to be ideal for my usage.

    But Mondraker does offer a 27.5" 'Super-enduro' bike that is positioned more as a Hard Enduro/ Light Downhill bike that utilizes a more Progressive rear suspension LR and I wonder if that platform might be better suited for a guy that does 30+ mph (wtf!!!)? Also the 27.5" wheel should not flex as readily.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 10-29-2018 at 11:58 AM.

  82. #82
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    if the Foxy 29 doesn't work for Streetdoctor I'd highly suggest him trying to demo the Devinci Spartan 29 as I know it'll pedal well on sprints and it has a nice and progressive LR.

    Split pivot is my favorite DW iteration. I think Colorado Cyclists does demos.

    I know it may be a bit on the heavy side but I'm sure he could get it under 30 lbs.
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    IMO the new Spartan 29 is way off on geometry. TT is at least 2" too short. Reach is at about .5-.75" too short.



    It's not a bike I would consider as geo is just too old school.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Streetdoctor, I'm a 29er guy and it sounds like you are as well.

    However it's worth noting that the Foxy 29 is positioned for the hard trail/ light enduro part of the spectrum. This is reflected in the higher BB height, as well the linear- regressive LR and shock choice on their premium version. Those suspension choices are designed to make trail chatter all but disappear, but it appears to be lacking in stock form for major obstacles. Honestly your description of bottoming on 1' drops is very concerning to me (It's probably not those little drops, but the repeated successive hits that bottomed it, which reflects a lot on the shock itself) cause I'll hit a couple of 6' to flat here and there and endless chunder and 1-2'ers. The reported traits of the Foxy 29 appear otherwise to be ideal for my usage.

    But Mondraker does offer a 27.5" 'Super-enduro' bike that is positioned more as a Hard Enduro/ Light Downhill bike that utilizes a more Progressive rear suspension LR and I wonder if that platform might be better suited for a guy that does 30+ mph (wtf!!!)? Also the 27.5" wheel should not flex as readily.
    After some time this morning on the phone with Fox and a local suspension shop I think you're right on in your assessment. The verdict was it will probably be really hard for me to get a bike with the LR of the Foxy29 feeling good with no bottom outs at my size and style. I'm going to check out the new Evil this afternoon which checks all my boxes and is very progressive. I'll probably be taking a chance and ordering up a frame this weekend if it feels good. I hit 37mph on the Foxy at WR.... That bike is fast!!! I'm a 29'er guy though, I wish they offered these bikes in adjustable leverage rates lol.
    Denver, CO

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    I rode both, Spartan 29 and Foxy 29. Liked both bikes. Both very fast, Foxy probably more efficient but Spartan faster Downhill plus more progressiv, I liked the high stack, gives lot of confidence in the steep stuff. Both felt on the stiff side regardingsuspension. To get an idea, I uploaded a vid from the Spartans testride:

    https://youtu.be/PFEfU0mAujk

    Steep climbs (only fireroad) were surprisingly a tad better on the Spartan, Foxy front end got lighter...

    I disagree with the Spartans Geo beeing off. Geo is modern, without beeing too progressiv nor too oldschool. And if Reach is too short, just size up and put a 30mm stem on it. I am 174cm which would put me right on a Medium. But the low ST lets me get away with a 150mm Dropper on the large. So as I will be using this as a racebike, I will probably go with the large, which has PLENTY progressiv geonumbers (take the Devinci FRG cup and you also get a 64.5 HA). It is crazy fast but with the short CS also quiet nimble to throw around.

    Foxy is a great bike though, just want something more progressiv as I am looking to but a coil on and I feel the Spartan is more capable on the downs.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-485c3619-85a9-48ab-9a7c-aed48b540b11.jpg

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    DUDE. That bike looks ridiculously sick! I gotta say though, if you're going to run THOSE cranks you need to at least upgrade your damper to the Grip2. It also sounds like Fox can re-valve the DPX2 and add an LSC adjustment for around $100. Looking into whether or not that's a better option than putting a 2019 X2 on it now.

    My plan is a similar build with polished hubs/spokes and possibly the same cranks all black/blue/polished.
    The damper has actually been upgraded to an avalanche open bath. The avalanche cartridge is amazing and I put it up against any damper in the industry. I will be seeking an alternative for the rear shock in the future.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    The damper has actually been upgraded to an avalanche open bath. The avalanche cartridge is amazing and I put it up against any damper in the industry. I will be seeking an alternative for the rear shock in the future.
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    Denver, CO

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    You stated in the video that you had the shock at 280 psi? That seems pretty high considering Iím 215 pounds and have the shock set at around 200 to 210 psi to achieve 35 to 32% SAG respectively.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    You stated in the video that you had the shock at 280 psi? That seems pretty high considering Iím 215 pounds and have the shock set at around 200 to 210 psi to achieve 35 to 32% SAG respectively.
    Right, that's what I needed to keep from bottoming. Running the sag so low made the initial and mid stroke pretty firm but pushing the bike hard it felt better that way deeper in the compression. If the bike had a progressive leverage rate I would run 25-30%. Unfortunately with that much sag I would have been bottoming everywhere. It's not real noticeable in the video but the consecutive hits a few seconds in front of where I dropped the chain (7:30ish) definitely overwhelmed the backend. Oddly enough I dropped a chain in the exact same spot on both the Foxy and the Ripmo which both have a regressive leverage rate. I've never dropped a chain there previously on my GG Smash or the Yeti SB150 both of which are much more progressive. I've ridden that trail a bunch (I think strava shows 26 laps) and that section actually has a segment and on that particular ride I placed 4th all time out of about 6000 so I'm definitely pushing the bike. I guess it's designed more as a trail/light enduro bike than full on Enduro which IMO is weird for a 150/160 travel bike.
    Denver, CO

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    Hmm interesting. Iím not having bottoming problems but I havenít ridden a full on DH trail yet. I have hit a 6í drop repeatedly without bottoming though. I have found that the bike likes a faster rebound than Iím used to. It feels too fast in the parking lot but feels amazing on the trails.

    I do want to experiment with volume spacers. At my weight I think they may offer some improvement.

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    Streetdoctor, you should talk to Austen at Qarv, the US importer for Mondraker located in Golden. I understand him and another guy there run the Foxy's, and both race the local Pro class.

    Both are on the Superdeluxe, that I know for a fact. I choose the Superdeluxe (I ordered the bike only after I had solved the rear suspension issue) because Craig at Avy looked at the LR of the Foxy 29 and told me that it's the correct shock for the bike in terms of air volume and what not.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Hmm interesting. Iím not having bottoming problems but I havenít ridden a full on DH trail yet. I have hit a 6í drop repeatedly without bottoming though. I have found that the bike likes a faster rebound than Iím used to. It feels too fast in the parking lot but feels amazing on the trails.

    I do want to experiment with volume spacers. At my weight I think they may offer some improvement.
    Yah, I was kind of wondering if something isn't way wrong, or maybe someone messed with the demo bike. cause that sounds like it was bottoming way too easily, especially considering the air pressure SD was running.

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Hmm interesting. Iím not having bottoming problems but I havenít ridden a full on DH trail yet. I have hit a 6í drop repeatedly without bottoming though. I have found that the bike likes a faster rebound than Iím used to. It feels too fast in the parking lot but feels amazing on the trails.

    I do want to experiment with volume spacers. At my weight I think they may offer some improvement.
    That was what me pushed me away from the bike. If you're running the DPX2 the volume spacer that's in it is the biggest you can use. Only other option is to send it to Fox or your favorite suspension shop) for a firm compression tune (stock is light).

    I'll reach out to Austen, thanks.

    GBS was supposed to get back to me today with details on the shock setup on the demo bike but I never heard from them. I'll call them back tomorrow.
    Denver, CO

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    I wouldn't want to mess with the compression tune personally. It pedals so well with everything open I'd hate to lose the small bump sensitivity that i have now.

    Craig at Avalanche hates the newer Fox Shocks. There are no true valves or shim stacks to tune rendering them useless to him. I do want to pick up a Super Deluxe Air for him to modify to realize the true potential of the suspension. I don't hate it now though, quite the contrary.

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    As I stated in the other Mondraker thread, I run 150 psi, and have yet to bottom out the shock. I just did a trip down south where I hit up Stokesville, Douthat, Carvin's Cove, Pisgah, and Dupont. If this bike was prone to bottoming out, those trails would have done it. Sounds like something was wrong with the demo bike. I stopped into Squatch Bikes in Brevard, NC while I was down there. They are a stocking dealer for Mondraker, and they hit up some massive trails on the Foxy without issue as well.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    I'll reach out to Austen, thanks.
    Austen, will be in Austin, TX today doing a Mondraker demo FYI as I'm going to try and make it.

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    I finally saw and rode the Foxy 29 for the first time today on a trail I know somewhat.
    It wasn't the best day for a late afternoon ride as I'd began my day at 1am on 2 hours of sleep, but I wasn't going to miss out.

    There was good and bad:

    The good was all the stuff that is fixed on a bike like turning (it's gawd-darn phenomenal), geometry (finally a bike that fits), it's efficient (it was slightly more efficient than my SB5.5 but my Yeti has slightly faster rolling tires and CFs wheels), it's real fast (without feeling fast), extremely confidence inspiring when steep roughness is on the menu, it's way radder looking in person (so nice really and amazing that the heavy parts are so centralized, it has a very low stand over, yet it still fits a water bottle), and it swallows short 1' vertical ledges on the trail in the rear (when you smash them, you literally don't feel them).

    The bad was mostly in the set up. Seat was set too low and was too narrow for my hip bones, I needed my extended spindle pedals as I was bumping my calves often on the chain stays but less after 45 minutes, I don't like 175mm cranks as I run 170s and this combined with the rear shock resulted in plenty of pedal strikes that i'm not used to, I don't love the DHRii as a front which is what they had on my demo, etc...
    On this build (the yellow one), I really disliked the suspension. But I have full Avy on my Yeti. It's a bigger difference than I realized. The Grip 2 was okay, but the DHX2 pounded me. Somehow it used too much travel, while being bone jarringly stiff over chatter. That shock sucks imo, on this bike. I can't help but wonder if the 35% sag they set it up with in part gave the bike it's phenomenal handling but contributed to the awful rear suspension performance I experienced.
    I've ridden a couple of other new bikes with the same suspension and they seemed way better, on my very short rides. Obviously I made no adjustments.

    I must say, I think 90% of riders would go better off if they put Avy on the old bike, instead of investing in a new bike and running stock suspension. I mean if you can't afford the latest bike and Avy suspension, you're better off on the old bike with the Avy suspension in my opinion. If I had to ride these bikes completely unchanged fron how they currently sit, I would prefer my old bike just because of the suspension. Fortunately for me, my new Foxy already has suspension from Avy sitting in the garage waiting for that frame to show up.

    I've been riding about 5 years but really got addicted in the last 2 years and essentially learned to ride on my SB5.5. It's going to take time for me to set up a new bike and become one with it.

    The guys at the Mondraker distributor and Alex the bike shop that represents the brand had a solid demo day and did a great job. Pizza and cold beer afterwards was appreciated.

    To make a good event even better, Alex the owner of the bike shop got word that my own frame just arrived at his shop and I could pick it up early tomorrow.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  99. #99
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    The bad was mostly in the set up. Seat was set too low and was too narrow for my hip bones, I needed my extended spindle pedals as I was bumping my calves often on the chain stays but less after 45 minutes, I don't like 175mm cranks as I run 170s and this combined with the rear shock resulted in plenty of pedal strikes that i'm not used to, I don't love the DHRii as a front which is what they had on my demo, etc...
    The stock saddle is garbage. A better one definitely makes the bike more comfortable. My calves brush the upper linkage all the time. It is something that doesn't bother me now. I wonder if the crank size is based on the frame size? My medium has 170's, and I think they are too long.

    EDIT: crank size is based on frame size according to Mondraker: S/M gets 170, L/XL gets 175.

    On this build (the yellow one), I really disliked the suspension. But I have full Avy on my Yeti. It's a bigger difference than I realized. The Grip 2 was okay, but the DHX2 pounded me. Somehow it used too much travel, while being bone jarringly stiff over chatter. That shock sucks imo, on this bike. I can't help but wonder if the 35% sag they set it up with in part gave the bike it's phenomenal handling but contributed to the awful rear suspension performance I experienced.
    I wonder how much of this is shock and how much of this is rear wheel path? The rear wheel has less backwards travel than other suspension designs which causes the rear wheel to be pulled over objects fairly quickly in the travel. Either way, look forward to pics of your build.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Streetdoctor, you should talk to Austen at Qarv, the US importer for Mondraker located in Golden. I understand him and another guy there run the Foxy's, and both race the local Pro class.

    Both are on the Superdeluxe, that I know for a fact. I choose the Superdeluxe (I ordered the bike only after I had solved the rear suspension issue) because Craig at Avy looked at the LR of the Foxy 29 and told me that it's the correct shock for the bike in terms of air volume and what not.
    Its a weight thing not just a speed thing. Austen is fast, however SD has about 35lbs on him and Austen is SMOOTH when you watch him ride. Not saying SD is a smasher but even if he was just as smooth, there is still the extra weight to deal with. the suspension on most bikes come from the factory based off a 160-180 lb rider. If you are outside of that..... well you need a custom tune or a leverage ration that lighter folks complain they cant get full travel on no matter how hard they try.

  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    the suspension on most bikes come from the factory based off a 160-180 lb rider. If you are outside of that..... well you need a custom tune or a leverage ration that lighter folks complain they cant get full travel on no matter how hard they try.
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    I had that impression too, but it came from hearsay. Interested in seeing hard evidence too. I'm 30 lbs off that target and wonder what I'm missing.

    I had the impression that as long as I tuned my spring rate, the only damping tuning I needed was rebound tuning to handle the return force of stiffer or lighter springs extending. In compression, I figure the spring rate normalizes the rate at which the compression has to work, allowing one bike & shock to handle riders of varying weight.

    I suppose heavier riders need more oil volume based on needing more damping force to control stronger spring extension (assuming this generates more heat). I suppose HSR could use tuning for those of much different weight. If anyone gets HSR custom tuned, they probably just get the compression side done too at the same time to account for riding style, type of trails, and desired ride feel according to the bike's leverage rate and spring rate curves.

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    I would say it's a near universal complaint that factory bikes have way too much high speed compression damping. It more so seems they're typically tuned for 220lb hucking kitties.

  104. #104
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    Also, I rode a large (i'm 5'11") with a 150 dropper and it's clear that my 175 with a shim will fit easily.
    Once KS releases a 185 or maybe even a 200 in 31.6 I'll get one.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  105. #105
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    Was it the DHX2 or DPX2 they had on this bike? The RR (yellow) normally comes with the DPX2.

    If it was the DHX2 that would explain the issues since this bike's LR is not good for a coil. Mondraker made a mistake spec'ing the top bike with it IMO.

  106. #106
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    All the bikes had the air shock. The cheaper Fox one. The rep verified that the X2 will bolt right on.
    Honestly it was so chattery I would have really liked to have ridden the coil.
    For a trail ride where I did not do any drops bigger than 2', the coil probably would have been much better.

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  107. #107
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    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.
    Denver, CO

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    All the bikes had the air shock. The cheaper Fox one. The rep verified that the X2 will bolt right on.
    Honestly it was so chattery I would have really liked to have ridden the coil.
    For a trail ride where I did not do any drops bigger than 2', the coil probably would have been much better.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I'm not sure the X2 is a solution. It needs a lower volume air shock to perform optimally. I'm curious to hear your impressions of the Avy tuned Super Deluxe. The DPX2 isn't necessarily a "cheaper" shock than the X2, it's intended for different purposes. According to Craig at Avy the X2 is extremely unreliable which is why I eliminated it as a candidate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.
    100% agree


    FWIW I'll be tuning the suspension with a Shock Wiz in the near future. I'll report my findings.

  109. #109
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    I can confirm that the 0.6cuin spacer does come installed stock. It looks like that is the largest spacer that can be used in this shock.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-cdefb02f-1736-44cb-a1f2-799b860b9f6e.jpeg

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.
    For sure I agree and I was one of the earliest proponents of that idea, when I was 1st looking at the bike. But now that I've ridden the bike and I give it better consideration, I think that for a lot of riders that don't do big jumps, the coil might be a better option.

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  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    I can confirm that the 0.6cuin spacer does come installed stock. It looks like that is the largest spacer that can be used in this shock.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thanks for confirming this and what a bummer. That's what the 4 digit Tune ID showed on the air can when I looked it up on the Fox site but I was really confused by the LBS saying it was a 0.2.... Apparently they didn't really look. To clarify they definitely didn't check the demo bike I rode because it was within sight of me, but they checked "one in back".
    Denver, CO

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    For sure I agree and I was one of the earliest proponents of that idea, when I was 1st looking at the bike. But now that I've ridden the bike and I give it better consideration, I think that for a lot of riders that don't do big jumps, the coil might be a better option.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I would say jumps won't be the issue, they're generally smooth. The issue will be with rocky terrain with repetitive hits like in the video I posted above. Nothing in that video is bigger than a 12" drop. I'm not sure why all the bike companies are making "trail" 29'ers with 150/160mm travel. These bikes are begging to be ridden hard and fast and they just aren't capable with someone bigger than 150lb. I'm not an engineer but it seems it would be easier to develop a bike around a progressive leverage rate and tune out any perceived harshness based on rider "aggressivity" (is that a word? LOL) and weight vs the opposite.

    Maybe in the future bike sizes will also have modified leverage rates. Assuming someone on a large or XL will weight north of 180lb, and more linear or progressive/regressive for the smaller sizes.
    Denver, CO

  113. #113
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    Man, I'm not sure why you guys had such bad experiences on this bike. I'm not experiencing what you're describing at all.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Man, I'm not sure why you guys had such bad experiences on this bike. I'm not experiencing what you're describing at all.
    Same here, but I am interested in your Shock Wiz findings.

  115. #115
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    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Wow. What a beaut!
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  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    I would say jumps won't be the issue, they're generally smooth. The issue will be with rocky terrain with repetitive hits like in the video I posted above. Nothing in that video is bigger than a 12" drop. I'm not sure why all the bike companies are making "trail" 29'ers with 150/160mm travel. These bikes are begging to be ridden hard and fast and they just aren't capable with someone bigger than 150lb. I'm not an engineer but it seems it would be easier to develop a bike around a progressive leverage rate and tune out any perceived harshness based on rider "aggressivity" (is that a word? LOL) and weight vs the opposite.

    Maybe in the future bike sizes will also have modified leverage rates. Assuming someone on a large or XL will weight north of 180lb, and more linear or progressive/regressive for the smaller sizes.
    That's a valving issue plain and simple. You might have ridden on a shock that was blown out. Austen with mondraker at the demo said he does 10 and 12' drops on his and he doesn't bottom it out.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  118. #118
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    Okay. ShockWiz ride done. I flogged the hell outta it this ride. 2nd place time on a DH section of this trail that is twisty and bumpy as hell.

    The short of it is that the DPX2 is not a great shock for this bike. Iím going to eat my previous words here. Anyone that weighs over 195# will just about have to close the rebound according to the ShcokWiz.

    I got as close as I could get to an ideal tune with the adjustments on the DPX2 Performance and the ShockWiz told me to slightly decrease low speed compression (canít be done), add a small spacer (canít be done), and slightly increase high speed compression (canít be done). This was with 193psi at 33% sag. Iím going to go back at 30% sag to see how that fairs. Going any higher on the pressure would overpower the rebound.

    FWIW the bike felt better than ever, really amazing on this ride.

    Maybe an X2 or a CCDB Air with their additional adjustments would be better? Custom tuned to my fat ass that is.

    Canít wait to hear how the Super Deluxe fairs Sun. Sick looking frame BTW!!!

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I had never heard of this color before, beautiful! Enjoy the building process!

    edit: that may actually just be a baby blue/red? It kinda looks like gray/orange.
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  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Congrats, and quoted again because it looks so nice.

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    That's a valving issue plain and simple. You might have ridden on a shock that was blown out. Austen with mondraker at the demo said he does 10 and 12' drops on his and he doesn't bottom it out.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I've been riding long enough to know when a shock is clapped out, I assure you this one wasn't. Austen isn't dropping 10-12' to flat, a transition landing no matter how high is really smooth and you really don't need any suspension at all. Put plainly it's a bad litmus test for what makes "good suspension". Ever watch a slopestyle comp like crankworx in person? Lots of hard tails on REALLY big jumps.... Austen also weighs about 150lb. I have a good 50 pounds on him. FWIW the last race we were at he had 40 seconds on me total over 24 minutes of racing and the only true DH stage he had less than 1 second on me.

    Where good suspension is necessary and design comes into play is on high speed repetitive hits. Like DH and Enduro racing. Unfortunately for bigger guys and current trends there's not a whole lot of bikes out there that work ideally for this type of riding. I'm not trying to knock anyone's personal bike choice. We all ride differently. My video review above should indicate the style of riding I enjoy. I hit 37mph in that video as well. It's simply not the bike I'm looking for much like the Ibis Ripmo. Take my review for what it is, based on the video evidence presented.
    Denver, CO

  122. #122
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    Not sure why the coloring looked so weird in the above photo. It's just a blue/ red XR model.

    Superdeluxe bolts right on!

    My combo MRP bash guard/ chain guide just won't clear the frame. Just the top chain guide portion contacts the frame before it bottoms out. Thankfully chain guides are pretty redundant these days. So I just chopped off the upper chain guide portion.

    As far as suspension goes, listen valving is what primarily controls the rate of the suspension movement. The spring, air or otherwise, is an uncontrolled pogo stick without the benefit of proper shock valving. Even with way to much, spring rate doesn't do much to prevent suspension bottoming. That's not what it's for.
    If multiple small but sharp hits are bottoming it's a bit not enough HSC and/ or too much HSR.

    I will ShockWiz the bike as well. It's a tool however, not the ultimate authority I have discovered.

    Ultimately these cheap Fox components do not have speed sensitive damping, which is needed.

    My BB arrives late tomorrow so I'll get a ride in on Friday for sure.

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  123. #123
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    Cool, weíll see you in the other threads then. Thanks for letting others who shred the gnar chunder faster than 99% of the other mere mortals know that this bike isnít for them 😁😉😉

    I hope you find a bike that suits you soon. In the meantime youíll just have to continue to lose races to that flawed bike that Austin is riding. Maybe we could get some video evidence of that? 😂

    Iím goofing around of course. Have fun out there.

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Cool, weíll see you in the other threads then. Thanks for letting others who shred the gnar chunder faster than 99% of the other mere mortals know that this bike isnít for them 

    I hope you find a bike that suits you soon. In the meantime youíll just have to continue to lose races to that flawed bike that Austin is riding. Maybe we could get some video evidence of that? 

    Iím goofing around of course. Have fun out there.
    Thereís always someone faster and I love chocolate (and beer). 

    To be fair there were 2 (maybe more?) disclaimers that my reviews are from the viewpoint of someone who races
    Denver, CO

  125. #125
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    To be faaaiiiirrrrr... Do you watch Letterkenny by any chance?

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    To be faaaiiiirrrrr... Do you watch Letterkenny by any chance?
    Denver, CO

  127. #127
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    Gonna give the X2 a shot. I can get my hands on one at no cost so why not? Iíve also reached out to another shock manufacturer to see if theyíll let me demo a shock to test its compatibility.

  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Gonna give the X2 a shot. I can get my hands on one at no cost so why not? Iíve also reached out to another shock manufacturer to see if theyíll let me demo a shock to test its compatibility.
    Who did you reach out to? I bet a DVO Topaz would feel great on this bike.

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Who did you reach out to? I bet a DVO Topaz would feel great on this bike.
    Canít reveal who yet. DVO Topaz is very similar to a Super Deluxe so youíre probably right.

  130. #130
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    Sun_PSD, how's things? You get that thing built up yet?

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Sun_PSD, how's things? You get that thing built up yet?
    So close.

    It's really my 1st bike build so after work it goes pretty slowly between the kid and the wife and all that.

    Everything is completed except the cranks (Eewings!) are not installed. I tried to install them last night but I guess they need an additional shim because they just had too much gap and it was making the chain ring incorrectly lined up. I was a pretty annoyed because it caused my chain ring to scratch my frame as a result.

    Since this happened last night I have not been able to speak to any bike shops about it, can I just go buy a 30mm spindle shim from any bike shop? Is this normal?

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  132. #132
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    Did you use a 2.5mm BB spacer in the drive side? You need a 2.5mm BB spacer between the BB and the frame and the metal 1.75mm spindle spacer that's included with the cranks. I had to get the 2.5mm spacer separately. ANy bike shop should have them.
    Here's a link to the manual (you probably have it though) We have the BSA73mm BB.

    http://www.canecreek.com/wp-content/...2018-FINAL.pdf

  133. #133
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    I used the included 1.75mm spacer on the drive side.

    I had the BB wrong! I looked at the same chart but concluded incorrectly that I only needed the 1.75mm spacer. I'll pick up a 2.5mm today (after work) and some fingernail polish for the scratch and be riding by 5 pm today.

    Thanks for that explanation as I needed that.

  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I used the included 1.75mm spacer on the drive side.

    I had the BB wrong! I looked at the same chart but concluded incorrectly that I only needed the 1.75mm spacer. I'll pick up a 2.5mm today (after work) and some fingernail polish for the scratch and be riding by 5 pm today.

    Thanks for that explanation as I needed that.
    Happy to help. I accidentally used one of the thin plastic spacers instead of the 1.75mm spacers initially. It didn't cause any rubbing but it was close and didn't look right. After going through the little box again, finding the actual 1.75mm spacer and installing it everything looks (and rides) great.

  135. #135
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    Mine took considerably more spacers but it's all good now.

    Heading out for first ride now.

    So check this out: on a Park Tool scale, 28.1# with a rear noodle, real tires, XD rear rim, and Avy cartridge.
    My on bike tool kit + water bottle holder+ pedals + bash guard weighs 2.4#, so a ready to ride weight of 30.5# straight up Enduro ready.

    That's impressive.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  136. #136
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    It is a phenomenal bicycle in every regard. I'm over the moon. It is superior to my yeti 5.5 in every measure, up, down and around.

    I really enjoy the extra confidence when descending very steep rough chutes..

    As far as the shock that I really disliked on the demo ride, the Superdeluxe with the Avalanche tune that I have is pure heaven.

    I hammered as fast as ever through repeated long fast rocky sections, and this suspension just held up beautifully The forks are considerably better as well, but the huge difference is in the shock.

  137. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It is a phenomenal bicycle in every regard. I'm over the moon. It is superior to my yeti 5.5 in every measure, up, down and around.

    I really enjoy the extra confidence when descending very steep rough chutes..

    As far as the shock that I really disliked on the demo ride, the Superdeluxe with the Avalanche tune that I have is pure heaven.

    I hammered as fast as ever through repeated long fast rocky sections, and this suspension just held up beautifully The forks are considerably better as well, but the huge difference is in the shock.
    Congrats - this has been on my list for a while...

    What size and how tall/inseam are you? Did you notice any bottom-out/blowing through travel on big hits?
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  138. #138
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    On a totally random note, a rolled up tube fits perfectly into the front triangle hole behind the head tube on the larger frames. Sadly, I cannot do this on my medium.

  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheezwhip View Post
    Congrats - this has been on my list for a while...

    What size and how tall/inseam are you? Did you notice any bottom-out/blowing through travel on big hits?
    I'm 5'11" but the story is a little more complicated than that. See I lost about 3/4" of height when I shattered my spine in an MX accident. Whoops. So my arms and legs are that of a person a bit taller I suppose. Pretty sure I run 33" from the pedal to top of the seat cause I'm in to efficiency.

    That's a 175mm KS Lev dropper on the bike and it's about all I can fit. I have about 8mm showing.

    So I smashed some very rough wheel stoppers at high speed (high speed in chunder for me is like 13 mph!) , but the only drops I did were small, like 2' and less. I'll go up to about a 5' drop to flat on a couple of trails I know well but that's my current limit. The wheel stoppers just go on and on at times and are just straight up jagged, often immovable rock, which I like!

    I did not use all of my suspension nor bottom it. I definitely have more to go. About 13mm to go on the rear shock (out of 62.5 to start with) which gives me more to work with on bigger hits and bike park trips. I set my sag quick and dirty at around 30% R 20% F.

    I rolled in to a very chunky gully that I'm not sure was even part of the trail. It was about 40' rough and darn steep (not even remotely possible to walk it), and this bike gave me so much confidence I just rolled with it. I used too much front brake at one point going down and the rear tire lifted, but I just let off and kept going.

    The efficiency is mad. Remember that I took all the parts right off my Yeti 5.5, well this bike is WAY faster than the Yeti with the exact drivetrain components right down to air pressure. It is shocking. I am certain I will have some riding buddies that will be shocked too. I was maintaining a considerably higher pace in the in between sections than I ever could consistently on the Yeti.

    After the Demo I did on the stock suspension the other day I was very prepared to say 'Hey, great bike but listen SI is just better" but now that I've ridden both bikes on Avy I'd take the Foxy 5:1 over the 5.5. It's not real plush, but dang it works.

    The new Eewing cranks I just installed might be a bit wider than my old X01s, I think they are as I had to shim them a lot to remove spacing, but I also have my extended spindle pedals that I usually run on the bike and I had zero issues with calf contact on the bike frame. I bumped them when I turned around to look behind me but while actually riding, no contact at all.

    I'm just tickled with the bike and so eager to get more time on it.

    Ps. Yeti 5.5 frame for sale. $1600 shipped!

  140. #140
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    Great to hear that you love it!

    Did you use the preload spacer ring screwing it in to take up the slack? It shouldn't take more than the recommended spacers. I suppose there's room for another one but it isn't necessary.

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    The efficiency is mad. Remember that I took all the parts right off my Yeti 5.5, well this bike is WAY faster than the Yeti with the exact drivetrain components right down to air pressure. It is shocking. I am certain I will have some riding buddies that will be shocked too. I was maintaining a considerably higher pace in the in between sections than I ever could consistently on the Yeti.

    After the Demo I did on the stock suspension the other day I was very prepared to say 'Hey, great bike but listen SI is just better" but now that I've ridden both bikes on Avy I'd take the Foxy 5:1 over the 5.5. It's not real plush, but dang it works.
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.

    What chainring size did you run on the SB55? I didn't like that one with a 32t or smaller chainring. Kind of demands a 36t, since it is made to race, and the anti-squat and kickback levels would be somewhat excessive with smaller. Some of the runs near me have the top 10 averaging almost 35 mph over a minute and a half; no way anyone's hitting that with a 32x10.

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.
    I guess their marketing is working!

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Great to hear that you love it!

    Did you use the preload spacer ring screwing it in to take up the slack? It shouldn't take more than the recommended spacers. I suppose there's room for another one but it isn't necessary.
    I called Cane Creek and they said " they take all different amounts of shims.
    Even though we have the exact same bike, and the same cranks, we have different BBs which I guess accounts for the difference.

    I needed 4mm on the drive side, 3mm on the drive side, and still 2 turns of the preload adjuster.

    Without the extra spacers, the rotor was right against the chainstay.

    It's fine, still pissed about the scratch though.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.

    What chainring size did you run on the SB55? I didn't like that one with a 32t or smaller chainring. Kind of demands a 36t, since it is made to race, and the anti-squat and kickback levels would be somewhat excessive with smaller. Some of the runs near me have the top 10 averaging almost 35 mph over a minute and a half; no way anyone's hitting that with a 32x10.
    I always ran a 32. Running the same on the Foxy.

    To be blunt, you can't ride a lot of our terrain on a 36T. Yeah, I could push a 34T, but the chain line would be less ideal.

    According to Antonio's blog, 32T combined with Eagle gives you pretty good AS #s on a 5.5. But if the bike needs a 36T to work right, it's not a bike that's ideal for me.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I called Cane Creek and they said " they take all different amounts of shims.
    Even though we have the exact same bike, and the same cranks, we have different BBs which I guess accounts for the difference.

    I needed 4mm on the drive side, 3mm on the drive side, and still 2 turns of the preload adjuster.

    Without the extra spacers, the rotor was right against the chainstay.

    It's fine, still pissed about the scratch though.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Oh gotcha, I thought you picked up the same BB that I did. Bummer about the scratch.

    Iím running a 30t oval because I donít need to go 40 and I like to have a bailout gear. Talking with some of the guys at Golden Bike Shop recently they were talking about going to 28t. Is running a bigger ring a badge of honor? If it is Iíll go pick up a 36t or 38t ASAP. 😁

  146. #146
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    Many bikes seem to have better AS #s with a bigger front rotor due to the angle of the chain.
    Look on a Yeti where the top of the chain is in relation to the moving pivot on the SI. When that chain line is above the pivot, AS increases. When the chain line is below that pivot, you get a 'raising the draw bridge effect'" meaning some of your pedal power goes in to the rear shock. Of course the chain line, and therefore the AS changes everytime the bike sags or you change gears.
    According to the charts, the Foxy isn't really sensitive to gearing choice. So choose your gearing so that what ever speed you mostly operate at, results in a straight chain line to reduce friction and wear the most.
    I don't climb big mountains, but we have tough climbs everywhere here. My experience is that a 28T is too slow to maintain momentum and also makes the gears too close together for my liking. I rarely use my 50T with a 32T anyways, and I think I'll use it less now on the Foxy.

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  147. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Oh gotcha, I thought you picked up the same BB that I did. Bummer about the scratch.

    Iím running a 30t oval because I donít need to go 40 and I like to have a bailout gear. Talking with some of the guys at Golden Bike Shop recently they were talking about going to 28t. Is running a bigger ring a badge of honor? If it is Iíll go pick up a 36t or 38t ASAP. 😁
    Some guys use a bigger ring to have a more straight chainline and put less torque on the chain (as compared to being in the 10 ring) when hammering. It also keeps the derailleur tucked a little more.
    Denver, CO

  148. #148
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    Understood. I donít have much issue topping out the 30t. There are sections where a 32-34 would be better. I like having the easy gears for the steep technical climbs we have around here. Theyíre short but they make you work.

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    You make it sound like mtn bikers 5~ years ago with 2x10 have badges of honor for their chainring sizes.

  150. #150
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    Second ride in the books and it just so happened to be on the same trail I demoed the Foxy on before I had mine just 5 days ago.
    It's just a ripping bike man. I'm sprinting in places that I couldn't before.
    This trail pounded me on the OEM suspension but felt great today on the Avy stuff. Although not as plush as my Avy tuned 5.5.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 11-05-2018 at 08:17 AM.

  151. #151
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    Shockwiz results from first ride with the Shockwiz on the Avy SuperDeluxe.
    Just set the sag and ran it the way Craig sent it.

    Deception is a great and bumpy trail, but it doesn't have as much harshness as some trails I ride. I suspect on the steeper yet rougher trails, the HSC will drop right in to the center.



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    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 11-05-2018 at 08:21 AM.

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Understood. I donít have much issue topping out the 30t. There are sections where a 32-34 would be better. I like having the easy gears for the steep technical climbs we have around here. Theyíre short but they make you work.
    This bike is sooo much faster particularly on the climbs than my previous bike, That I'm doing some very steep stuff in 3rd gear and the absolute slowest of them all in 2nd.

    In time I might go to a 34T oval because I'm just going faster everywhere. I'm going to find a section of trail where I'm sort of in my power gear and I'm going to come to a stop without shifting and examine my chain line. I want that chain line to be as ideal as possible in the gears I spend most of my time on. I only topped out the old bike on pavement sections and I don't see that changing on this bike.

    We'll see.

  153. #153
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    I think it was GearTech that had the tip about moving the rear tire fender to the other sides of the tab?

    This works well. You don't even have to undo the factory zip ties as the plastic fender is so flexible that you just pop each corner of the fender around the tab placing the fender closer to the shock and further from the tire.

    With this little hack, my rear tire clearance to a 2.35 Hans Dampf went from marginal to more than enough.

    But a 2.4 tire is all this frame can comfortably handle. I have a brand new 2.5 Aggressor on the shelf that I won't be able to run.

  154. #154
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    It was someone else that made that suggestion. I looked at it, doesn't the lower portion of the fender rub on the linkage if it isn't cut?

  155. #155
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    In other news, the Float X2 fits like a glove. Can't wait to see how it feels!

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-img_8240.jpg

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    Nice!

  157. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    It was someone else that made that suggestion. I looked at it, doesn't the lower portion of the fender rub on the linkage if it isn't cut?
    That was me. The lower fender tab doesn't hit the link when moved to the other side of the mounting points. If you move it closer to the shock then you will need to trim the fender tab off. It doesn't really matter as the bottom of the fender doesn't seem to block much crap from getting onto the link.

    This bike could probably use some moto foam in front of the shock too. I've already ground down some acorns and leaves while riding.

  158. #158
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    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco

  159. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I'm 5'11" but the story is a little more complicated than that. See I lost about 3/4" of height when I shattered my spine in an MX accident. Whoops. So my arms and legs are that of a person a bit taller I suppose. Pretty sure I run 33" from the pedal to top of the seat cause I'm in to efficiency.
    33"? Ok, so now I understand why you wanted such a longer bike. At basically the same height, I'm at 37" from spindle to seat top.

    Glad you're loving the new bike.

  160. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoM85BG View Post
    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco
    I believe the Alloy version was just released, the Carbon actually came first. Unless you are referring to the 27.5 version?

    There are many 205x62.5 shocks available now and I'm sure more will come available in the future since it is not such an uncommon size anymore. A shock change to the proper size poses no danger unless there is interference between the shock and frame or linkage.

  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoM85BG View Post
    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco
    The Alloy Foxy 29 should ride the same, just gain a small bit of weight. Probably about 1#-1.5#, which is about the same amount it would gain going from that non-reservoir shock, to a coil shock.

    As far as the shocks go, you or your shock tuner can easily add a stroke limiting spacer as this is the same way the manufacturers limit the travel. The overall length must be 205 however. Avalanche added a machined nylon spacer for me while revalving and didn't even charge me any extra.

    The guys at Qarv (the US Mondraker distributor) actually tested a 205 x 65 shock for me (Austen, Cal and those guys are awesome) on a Foxy 29 and told me that clearance is too tight and that I needed to limit stroke to 62.5mm.

    BTW, for a trail bike, that lower air volume shock DPS that is on the alloy version is likely a better fit for this LR.

    It looks like currently the shocks you can get for this bike are currently the: DPX2, X2, the DHX2 (I just sold my take off to a guy here), DVO, and lastly you can just purchase the Rockshox Superdeluxe RC3 either take off from the Spartan or maybe someone could get Sram to sell just sell them since they are already providing them for OEM builds.

    PS. I tried to buy a shock roller bearing kit for my Foxy 29 but they are not possible. Something to do with the way the lower eyelet bolt threads in. It's a shame but I don't really care as the bike is working GREAT!

  162. #162
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    Did some ShockWizzing this afternoon with the X2. It's a great shock for this bike. I'm 220 geared up running 195psi for about 33% sag. I had some interesting findings. HSC and LSC are fully open and ShockWiz was even asking that it be open slightly more. Rebound on the other hand is only 6-7 clicks from closed for a perfect score on the Wiz. The overall score was a 96% which is pretty good. I did use all of the travel but I couldn't tell that I did. The testing included a fast heavily rooted section, a slower section with many 1'-2' rock step downs and a 4' drop at the end, repeated 5' drops at speed and sufficient pedally sections in between. I sessioned all of this about ten times. I do need to get out on a full ride with the Wiz to get a better cross section of my typical ride but for now it feels fast and stable. I need to get some good really high speed bumpy sections for testing. I have the feeling it'll ask to up the compression a bit then.

    After I recover from spending all this money on this build the X2 will be going to Avalanche to become phenomenal instead of just great.

    It's hard to describe the feeling of the suspension this bike. It's not "plush" where you are numb from what is going on underneath you but when it's dialed in you "feel" the trail and have really excellent traction everywhere. That plus the ridiculously great geometry make this a high speed weapon.

    The reviews are correct. It's fast and likes to be going fast.

  163. #163
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    Glad the X2 is working out.

    My Shockwiz took a kick from my leg today and I lost like 30psi shock pressure which wrecked a portion of my ride.

    I did use all but maybe the last 6mm of my fork stanchion tube with about 94psi in it; but the shock is good and not in danger of a hard bottom for me.

    But listen, for all the radness going fast and descending on this bike, the real story is the way it climbs, accelerates, and even goes on the flats. It's XC fast. My usual riding partner, that often has more endurance and can remain faster longer than me, is getting dropped badly in the in-between sections. Sweeping, fast, pedally sections, man I'm gone.

    I loved the turning when I demoed the Foxy, but I've struggled with the turning on my personal bike. Could be set up, my tire choice, suspension, 42 (instead of 44) offset, or just trail conditions (it's been slick). If i'm going real fast, it's a good turning bike. But with slick with tight turns it's hard to keep the bike on line, or even get it there. The bike needs to be leaned but on tight single track with trees on the inside that's tough.

    Still loving this thing. When I have my flow and am using momentum, it's real fast.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  164. #164
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    Youíre right. Itís just fast everywhere which is what makes it so exceptional. Iíve PRíd climbs and full loops on just about every ride without trying or even realizing I was going that fast.

    The flat corner turning at medium speed is something to get used to. I still donít have it down consistently. If there are trees on the inside forget about it if itís slick. I am running DHR II 2.3R 2.4wtF and it did improve the cornering everywhere vs the Aggressor. I want to move the DHR 2.4 to the rear and try a 2.5wt DHF on the front soon.

  165. #165
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    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 11-07-2018 at 05:34 AM.

  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    Tires are fun aren't they? Expensive though...

    Experiment with sessioning a corner that is giving you trouble. I did this over the weekend on a turn that was giving me fits and I found that I just didn't have my weight balanced correctly. There's a lot of room on this bike to move forward and back. It seems like you have to keep your weight forward a bit but not extremely so. Being low and really weighting the bike evenly or maybe a little frontward bias is working well for me. Trees on the inside line are tough, just have to find the right line if there even is one. The good thing is that if you have to take a turn a little slower the bike accelerates so quickly you can make up for it lol. That gets tiring though...

  167. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    I never liked the Hans Dampf for anything other than straight lines. I still have the Aggressor out back and the DHR up front, and have had good results. My go-to tires have been E13's lately, and I've had really good luck with the Bonty XR4's too. I'll probably swap to either of these next season.

  168. #168
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    How about the e.13 TRS Race/+? Has anyone any experience with them? Been thinking of trying them out when my MaxxWearouts are toasted.

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    e13 TRS Race rolls worse than a High Roller 2 and DHF. Not sure about the Plus version, which I got the impression was the budget version.

    I know my Kenda Hellkat outdoes the e13 tires in grip and toughness (both roll pretty slow), and the Spec Eliminator is almost a Hellkat clone in tread pattern. Hellkat's my new standard to judge tires against, and the Eliminator is on my list to try after I wear out the Hellkat and try the Assegai.

  170. #170
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    It's pretty easy to get great traction. The key is to get the fastest rolling tires while having just enough traction.

    Any tire I run, I'll push it to where it begins to drift regularly.

    When I use to ride a lot by myself I'd run boat anchor tires, which really helped my novice confidence. But when you jump in these advanced group rides with a bunch or racers, you have to sprint on every in between section just to stay in the group. Managing a slight loss of grip on a decent is easy, but sprinting all out on every pedally section on slow rolling tires, will push you past your lactate threshold almost immediately, from which you will not recover from on that ride.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  171. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It's pretty easy to get great traction. The key is to get the fastest rolling tires while having just enough traction.

    Any tire I run, I'll push it to where it begins to drift regularly.

    When I use to ride a lot by myself I'd run boat anchor tires, which really helped my novice confidence. But when you jump in these advanced group rides with a bunch or racers, you have to sprint on every in between section just to stay in the group. Managing a slight loss of grip on a decent is easy, but sprinting all out on every pedally section on slow rolling tires, will push you past your lactate threshold almost immediately, from which you will not recover from on that ride.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Sounds like youíre doing cross country rides on a 150/160 travel bike?
    Denver, CO

  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I never liked the Hans Dampf for anything other than straight lines. I still have the Aggressor out back and the DHR up front, and have had good results. My go-to tires have been E13's lately, and I've had really good luck with the Bonty XR4's too. I'll probably swap to either of these next season.
    I've tried them 3x now (rear only) and the newest one is working pretty well for me so far as a great rolling, pretty good traction tire. But trail conditions have been iffy so the jury is still out.
    They have a rep as tearing easily, but I damage tires much less these days and run a noodle as my 'get home plan'. No problems so far.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  173. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Sounds like youíre doing cross country rides on a 150/160 travel bike?
    Not even close. But we have to pedal a lot. We don't have huge descents here. The longest are maybe 10 min and still require plenty of pedaling to go your fastest.
    I watched your video, if you took the roughest of that terrain, and often rougher, it's like that but rolling the entire time, up and down.

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  174. #174
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  175. #175
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    Pretty typical Foxy review. Very capable and fast bike. But if you are looking for the best bike, well it's not at a great price. I'm glad I went frame only for sure.

    I'm crazy for mine. Really enjoying the heck out of it. And I've definitely learned to turn the thing well.

    My talent or bravery has not improved (well maybe marginally more brave) on this bike, but overall speed on a trail is notably faster.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-l-foxy-29-28.2-.jpg

  176. #176
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    Last update for a while from me.

    I am braver on this bike. Went to a trail that has given me fits the few times I rode it before. It's got some very steep rocky descends that go on for about 20 seconds or so (I'm sure that's short to other people). Too steep to stop or even slow down much, have to execute a couple of curves and if you don't you are going to nail a tree or rock and going to have a long tumble down. Basically once you start there is no stopping. No problem on the Foxy! The bike's geometry just inspires confidence. This was something I specifically was looking to remedy with this purchase and it worked for me. I found the Yeti 5.5 had me feeling perched up a bit high, awkward, and forward and this effected my confidence a lot on steeps. No longer a problem.

    I'm still working on a good feel for a solid manual on the bike (radically different stem and bike length makes this more different than I expected) and as a novice doing drops up to about 5' on the previous Yeti, well I'm still working up to it on the Mondraker. But what I've done (3'ers), it handles them beautifully and I look forward to getting back to where I was and beyond in this regard.

    Climbing and the flat in between sections were another part of my skills that were lacking and I wanted something that climbed better than the Yeti 5.5 I had, which is no easy task. I have been a good explosive short term rocky climber for some time, but the sustained stuff would have me passing out from exhaustion. No more! This bike is insanely efficient and really gives me the gusto to push on the flats and longer climbs. It's noticeable. I have a regular riding partner that 3 weeks ago was smoking me on the pedally sections if they went on for more than 2-3 minutes. Well this has been reversed and I spent plenty of time waiting for him the last 2 times we rode, with me on the Foxy. It's not a small difference and I really got my money's worth in regard to the Foxy helping me with my riding shortcomings.

    Who says you can't buy yourself faster? I sure did!

    Oh, and my Avy suspension front and rear is flippin' awesome. I have still not used the last 3-4mm of my rear shock or the last 10mm of the forks, so that's my reserve for the bigger drops I guess.

  177. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    At 200lbs for the corect spring/air on most bikes the rebound wasnt enough. Same for forks. Compression is hit or miss, most suspention components wont blow off compression enough (HSC)you're using a lot of LSC.

    A lot of people get used to their bike, but it doesnt mean its optimal.

  178. #178
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    Question for those with the bike. How do you feel about the stack height? My medium feels about an 1" too low for me to ride comfortably on long trips. On short rides I don't notice it as much. I will be adding a riser bar (maybe 50mm) to the cockpit over the winter to see how this changes things up for next season.

  179. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Question for those with the bike. How do you feel about the stack height? My medium feels about an 1" too low for me to ride comfortably on long trips. On short rides I don't notice it as much. I will be adding a riser bar (maybe 50mm) to the cockpit over the winter to see how this changes things up for next season.
    I run my stem nearly slammed but I've always ran 40mm rise Renthal bars. I do this to increase Reach on all my bikes.

    Using the exact same components from my Yeti, the Mondraker actually has the bars slightly higher than I remember my Yeti being in relation to the seat.

    On edit: the Foxy has 4mm MORE stack height than my previous Yeti 5.5.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 11-17-2018 at 09:35 AM.

  180. #180
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    It's no biggie, but I get a little rear tire rub.
    I'm running a rear XD Nobl TR36 (30mm ID) wheel laced up with Sapim spokes.
    Tire is the newest Hans Dampf 2.35 and it measures an actual 2.46!

    I'm currently experimenting with my lowest pressure yet at 26psi (I weigh 180#) and this is only possible due to me running a rear tire noodle (Pepi's).

    I'm more than decent through the rough fast turns.

    Just an FYI.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-20181117_080730.jpeg

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  181. #181
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    So is anyone going to try out the included front offset to try a 65 degree head angle for shredding, or maybe even the 67 degree for trail riding?

    Curious if anyone has experimented with the former.

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    So is anyone going to try out the included front offset to try a 65 degree head angle for shredding, or maybe even the 67 degree for trail riding?

    Curious if anyone has experimented with the former.
    Isn't the adjustable geo only available on the frameset and the XR complete? I know it can be purchased separately, I but haven't seen the need for it yet? Do you have pics of the kit? How does it work?

  183. #183
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    Hey there!
    I'm currently riding an alloy Foxy R 2016 and I would really want to do an upgrade for 2019. I am after more efficiency and rollover from 29 inch wheels, but I would also appreciate a more compliant fork and rear end.
    I'm a bit worried that the Foxy 29 will be just as harsh-ish as my current rig.
    Any insights from users who had Dunes or Foxys and now got the Foxy 29?
    I'm also curious if the relatively high BB on paper feels high on steep descents.
    And what do you guys experienced with coil on the new Foxy?
    Right now I'm kind of puzzled if to get a Capra 29 or a Foxy29.

  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Isn't the adjustable geo only available on the frameset and the XR complete? I know it can be purchased separately, I but haven't seen the need for it yet? Do you have pics of the kit? How does it work?
    I'm not at my shop but it's just a couple of offset cups that you install in the steer tube.



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  185. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    Hey there!
    I'm currently riding an alloy Foxy R 2016 and I would really want to do an upgrade for 2019. I am after more efficiency and rollover from 29 inch wheels, but I would also appreciate a more compliant fork and rear end.
    I'm a bit worried that the Foxy 29 will be just as harsh-ish as my current rig.
    Any insights from users who had Dunes or Foxys and now got the Foxy 29?
    I'm also curious if the relatively high BB on paper feels high on steep descents.
    And what do you guys experienced with coil on the new Foxy?
    Right now I'm kind of puzzled if to get a Capra 29 or a Foxy29.
    I only demoed a stock Foxy 29 1 day before I picked up my own frameset.

    The demo bike suspension was really harsh. But for my own Foxy 29 I had purchased my own suspension and had it revalved by Avalanche Racing. The suspension is beautiful front and rear. The rear end seemed a bit more firm/ supportive than my previous Yeti 5.5, which feels just perfect.

    I never rode on the stock coil shock that came on mine. I really wanted to but needed to be able to sell it as a new take off. The guy that bought it in the UK maybe can report back on it's performance compared to his DPX air shock as I know he lurks here. I'm sure the coil really sucks up trail chatter but also lacks big hit capability. Which may not matter to you.

    As far as efficiency and roll over goes, the Foxy 29 is positively outstanding in this regard. I love the efficiency, what a difference!

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  186. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post

    The demo bike suspension was really harsh. But for my own Foxy 29 I had purchased my own suspension and had it revalved by Avalanche Racing. The suspension is beautiful front and rear. The rear end seemed a bit more firm/ supportive than my previous Yeti 5.5, which feels just perfect.


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    I am really curious what that revalving actually means, and if I could do that at my LBS or service in Romania. The last thing I want after such a purchase is a harsh ride. Actually, that's from what I'm trying to run from.
    I would go for the XR alloy, with Lyrik up front and swap the coil for a super deluxe.

  187. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    I am really curious what that revalving actually means, and if I could do that at my LBS or service in Romania. The last thing I want after such a purchase is a harsh ride. Actually, that's from what I'm trying to run from.
    I would go for the XR alloy, with Lyrik up front and swap the coil for a super deluxe.
    Revalving is a very common process on motorcycles. Just about any race prepped motorcycle is going to be revalved.

    On a MTB, these shocks are off the shelf units that either have a soft/ medium/ or hard valving stack. The valving stack is in the simplest terms, a set of orifices that oil is forced through to control the rate at which the shock moves. This is the manufacturer getting as close as they can at a very reasonable price. After all Fox is not going to custom tune shocks for specific applications, size bikes, and needs. Even if they could the cost would be outrageous. They are not in the business of creating unlimited part numbers after all, hard to make money doing that.

    Since Avalanche (there might be Euro equivalents) manufacturers new internal components, and has testing equipment, this is not something a bike shop can replicate. If they say they can, I'd question them.

    I don't know if the Foxy demo with the air shock I rode was just set in a manner that I didn't like, or if they all ride like that stock.

    If I lived in Romania and $$ wasn't such a big issue, I'd assess my riding preferences. If you ride tons of chunder but aren't concerned with drops over say 4' or significant jumps, I'd order the Coil XR and be done. Or they have a real nice aftermarket Coil shock in Europe (name escapes me) that has a hydraulic bottom out control, that would be amazing on the Foxy imo. In that case you could just buy the R version, and order whatever shock you wanted.

    You also have the option of tracking down a shock in the USA, having it shipped directly to Avy, then having them send it to you.

    I think you will be fine with the stock forks, but you can ride whatever the bike comes with and just start working on getting the shock you want.

    Good luck!

  188. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Revalving is a very common process on motorcycles. Just about any race prepped motorcycle is going to be revalved.

    On a MTB, these shocks are off the shelf units that either have a soft/ medium/ or hard valving stack. The valving stack is in the simplest terms, a set of orifices that oil is forced through to control the rate at which the shock moves. This is the manufacturer getting as close as they can at a very reasonable price. After all Fox is not going to custom tune shocks for specific applications, size bikes, and needs. Even if they could the cost would be outrageous. They are not in the business of creating unlimited part numbers after all, hard to make money doing that.

    Since Avalanche (there might be Euro equivalents) manufacturers new internal components, and has testing equipment, this is not something a bike shop can replicate. If they say they can, I'd question them.

    I don't know if the Foxy demo with the air shock I rode was just set in a manner that I didn't like, or if they all ride like that stock.

    If I lived in Romania and $$ wasn't such a big issue, I'd assess my riding preferences. If you ride tons of chunder but aren't concerned with drops over say 4' or significant jumps, I'd order the Coil XR and be done. Or they have a real nice aftermarket Coil shock in Europe (name escapes me) that has a hydraulic bottom out control, that would be amazing on the Foxy imo. In that case you could just buy the R version, and order whatever shock you wanted.

    You also have the option of tracking down a shock in the USA, having it shipped directly to Avy, then having them send it to you.

    I think you will be fine with the stock forks, but you can ride whatever the bike comes with and just start working on getting the shock you want.

    Good luck!
    Thanks so much for your thorough explanation. Really appreciated.
    Yeah, I'm more concerned on small to medium bump compliance, as I don't do that much jumps, only on the small side and negligible in number, that's why I would go for the coil.
    On the other hand, I do some bike trips a few times a year, that require me to ride with a larger backpack instead of my usual hip pack, and that adds quite some weight which might make me move to a harder spring. The thing is that it seems rather complicated to do that every now and then.

  189. #189
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    Order the XR, you'll love it. Don't worry about changing the spring.
    If you find faults, work on getting a killer air shock at your own pace.

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  190. #190
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    Turns out my rear rim had taken a pretty good hit and was warped and I broke a spoke as well. That might have been the sole cause of my rear tire rub.

    Hit a 5' to flat drop today 2x, totally plush landing. However my shock O-ring was nearing it's limit.

    Absolutely adore this bike as I've never covered ground this fast. So confidence inspiring.



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  191. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Turns out my rear rim had taken a pretty good hit and was warped and I broke a spoke as well. That might have been the sole cause of my rear tire rub.

    Hit a 5' to flat drop today 2x, totally plush landing. However my shock O-ring was nearing it's limit.

    Absolutely adore this bike as I've never covered ground this fast. So confidence inspiring.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Hey, if you bottom and donít notice youíre setup is money.

    Good review, quite accurate. Heís right about the disappointing builds for the money. The frame is also pretty expensive but worth it.

    Iíve moved my 2.4 DHR II WT to the rear and put a 2.5 DHF WT on the front. If you put grip over rolling resistance this is a great combo on the Foxy. It doesnít roll terribly but itís not like itís on Aspens.

    I PR climbs and flat segments every time out. It suprised me for sure. Faster than my former Scott Spark 29 which shocked me.

    Itís not exactly an enduro race bike as the LR may not be progressive enough. Could it race enduro? Absolutely and I will race it next season. Itís certainly more than a trail bike. Itís exactly the bike Iíd hope to own.

  192. #192
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    Got the Foxy 29 R too! It is a great bike, though it has some issues... I really don't like the rear tire clearance. I'm also thinking about bumping the fork travel to 170mm... Anyone tried that?
    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-p1090985.jpg

  193. #193
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    Did anyone had the chance to compare the Foxy 29 to a Capra29 or Ransom?
    I heard that the Ransom is much more plush at the rear and just as effective at climbing.
    Really curious to hear from someone who has ridden them.

  194. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    Did anyone had the chance to compare the Foxy 29 to a Capra29 or Ransom?
    I heard that the Ransom is much more plush at the rear and just as effective at climbing.
    Really curious to hear from someone who has ridden them.
    I wonder who you heard that from? I mean there's not many people that have ridden either of these bikes so there is probably not a lot of people that have ridden both.

    My impression however is that yes the Ransom, when the suspension lockout is engaged will climb every bit as well as the Foxy. And when it's unlocked, it's going to be more plush.

    You have to decide if your riding is it constant up, down, up, down? Or is it one long up and then 1 long down. That would be the determining factor for me. I simply don't have any interest in locking out suspension with the riding we do where I'm located.

    For me, the sizing on the Foxy alone was sort of a deal closer. The fact that the geometry is dialed, it climbs amazing, the ground clearance, and even the looks, hit all my sweet spots. I'm not going back to something an inch shorter. Ever.

    Good luck.

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  195. #195
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    I'm not going back to something an inch shorter. Ever.

    That's what she said.

  196. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    Did anyone had the chance to compare the Foxy 29 to a Capra29 or Ransom?
    I heard that the Ransom is much more plush at the rear and just as effective at climbing.
    Really curious to hear from someone who has ridden them.
    Nick, streetdoctor, has, I'll tell him to come give his impressions.
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  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    Did anyone had the chance to compare the Foxy 29 to a Capra29 or Ransom?
    I heard that the Ransom is much more plush at the rear and just as effective at climbing.
    Really curious to hear from someone who has ridden them.
    I demoíed a Foxy29 pretty extensively and ended up with a Ransom. The ransom is way more plush! The cool thing about the ransom is you can put it in ďtraction modeĒ with the touch of your thumb and climb and descend in this setting without issue if your trails donít dictate a full 170/170 travel. Traction mode reduces travel to 120mm and while in 120mm the bike still feels ďgoodĒ. You also have an option of full lock out but I donít really find that necessary.
    Denver, CO

  198. #198
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    Oh yah, I forgot SD has ridden both!

    SD, you went with the Ransom primarily because of the rear LR, and your speed and size really required more a progressive LR correct than the Foxy provided? I recall you said you set some PRs on the Foxy. I'm sure you are hitting more on the Ransom now as well..

    I dig the Ransom a LOT. I just don't want a 170 bike for what amounts to 3 sec to 5 min MAX descents (and literally just a handful of those) around here. It's mostly roll in to a 25' canyon/ gully, go up the other side, and the trail follows the canyon and does this over and over with a lot of climbing. That's a central TX trail. With most descends probably averaging no more than 10 seconds, it's just too brief to change suspension settings, even if it's just a switch on the bars.

  199. #199
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    Holy crap! Look how paper thin that top tube looks? Beautiful geo, but just from a side view perspective, looks like I can easily snap that tube.
    AM -> 2018 Meta AM v4.2 :rockon:
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  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrFreelancer View Post
    Holy crap! Look how paper thin that top tube looks? Beautiful geo, but just from a side view perspective, looks like I can easily snap that tube.
    Lol.

    I don't think you realize how forces act upon that upper rail. It's also solid, whereas tubular rails are hollow.
    The frame has a lifetime warranty.
    I'm not worried.

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