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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    the suspension on most bikes come from the factory based off a 160-180 lb rider. If you are outside of that..... well you need a custom tune or a leverage ration that lighter folks complain they cant get full travel on no matter how hard they try.
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    I had that impression too, but it came from hearsay. Interested in seeing hard evidence too. I'm 30 lbs off that target and wonder what I'm missing.

    I had the impression that as long as I tuned my spring rate, the only damping tuning I needed was rebound tuning to handle the return force of stiffer or lighter springs extending. In compression, I figure the spring rate normalizes the rate at which the compression has to work, allowing one bike & shock to handle riders of varying weight.

    I suppose heavier riders need more oil volume based on needing more damping force to control stronger spring extension (assuming this generates more heat). I suppose HSR could use tuning for those of much different weight. If anyone gets HSR custom tuned, they probably just get the compression side done too at the same time to account for riding style, type of trails, and desired ride feel according to the bike's leverage rate and spring rate curves.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    I would say it's a near universal complaint that factory bikes have way too much high speed compression damping. It more so seems they're typically tuned for 220lb hucking kitties.

  4. #104
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    Also, I rode a large (i'm 5'11") with a 150 dropper and it's clear that my 175 with a shim will fit easily.
    Once KS releases a 185 or maybe even a 200 in 31.6 I'll get one.

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  5. #105
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    Was it the DHX2 or DPX2 they had on this bike? The RR (yellow) normally comes with the DPX2.

    If it was the DHX2 that would explain the issues since this bike's LR is not good for a coil. Mondraker made a mistake spec'ing the top bike with it IMO.

  6. #106
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    All the bikes had the air shock. The cheaper Fox one. The rep verified that the X2 will bolt right on.
    Honestly it was so chattery I would have really liked to have ridden the coil.
    For a trail ride where I did not do any drops bigger than 2', the coil probably would have been much better.

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  7. #107
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    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    All the bikes had the air shock. The cheaper Fox one. The rep verified that the X2 will bolt right on.
    Honestly it was so chattery I would have really liked to have ridden the coil.
    For a trail ride where I did not do any drops bigger than 2', the coil probably would have been much better.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I'm not sure the X2 is a solution. It needs a lower volume air shock to perform optimally. I'm curious to hear your impressions of the Avy tuned Super Deluxe. The DPX2 isn't necessarily a "cheaper" shock than the X2, it's intended for different purposes. According to Craig at Avy the X2 is extremely unreliable which is why I eliminated it as a candidate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.
    100% agree


    FWIW I'll be tuning the suspension with a Shock Wiz in the near future. I'll report my findings.

  9. #109
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    I can confirm that the 0.6cuin spacer does come installed stock. It looks like that is the largest spacer that can be used in this shock.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-cdefb02f-1736-44cb-a1f2-799b860b9f6e.jpeg

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    The leverage rate for that bike is not suitable for a coil. Regardless of what configuration Mondraker sells with it.
    For sure I agree and I was one of the earliest proponents of that idea, when I was 1st looking at the bike. But now that I've ridden the bike and I give it better consideration, I think that for a lot of riders that don't do big jumps, the coil might be a better option.

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  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    I can confirm that the 0.6cuin spacer does come installed stock. It looks like that is the largest spacer that can be used in this shock.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thanks for confirming this and what a bummer. That's what the 4 digit Tune ID showed on the air can when I looked it up on the Fox site but I was really confused by the LBS saying it was a 0.2.... Apparently they didn't really look. To clarify they definitely didn't check the demo bike I rode because it was within sight of me, but they checked "one in back".

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    For sure I agree and I was one of the earliest proponents of that idea, when I was 1st looking at the bike. But now that I've ridden the bike and I give it better consideration, I think that for a lot of riders that don't do big jumps, the coil might be a better option.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I would say jumps won't be the issue, they're generally smooth. The issue will be with rocky terrain with repetitive hits like in the video I posted above. Nothing in that video is bigger than a 12" drop. I'm not sure why all the bike companies are making "trail" 29'ers with 150/160mm travel. These bikes are begging to be ridden hard and fast and they just aren't capable with someone bigger than 150lb. I'm not an engineer but it seems it would be easier to develop a bike around a progressive leverage rate and tune out any perceived harshness based on rider "aggressivity" (is that a word? LOL) and weight vs the opposite.

    Maybe in the future bike sizes will also have modified leverage rates. Assuming someone on a large or XL will weight north of 180lb, and more linear or progressive/regressive for the smaller sizes.

  13. #113
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    Man, I'm not sure why you guys had such bad experiences on this bike. I'm not experiencing what you're describing at all.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Man, I'm not sure why you guys had such bad experiences on this bike. I'm not experiencing what you're describing at all.
    Same here, but I am interested in your Shock Wiz findings.

  15. #115
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    Did I get the first frame only?



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  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



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    Wow. What a beaut!
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  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    I would say jumps won't be the issue, they're generally smooth. The issue will be with rocky terrain with repetitive hits like in the video I posted above. Nothing in that video is bigger than a 12" drop. I'm not sure why all the bike companies are making "trail" 29'ers with 150/160mm travel. These bikes are begging to be ridden hard and fast and they just aren't capable with someone bigger than 150lb. I'm not an engineer but it seems it would be easier to develop a bike around a progressive leverage rate and tune out any perceived harshness based on rider "aggressivity" (is that a word? LOL) and weight vs the opposite.

    Maybe in the future bike sizes will also have modified leverage rates. Assuming someone on a large or XL will weight north of 180lb, and more linear or progressive/regressive for the smaller sizes.
    That's a valving issue plain and simple. You might have ridden on a shock that was blown out. Austen with mondraker at the demo said he does 10 and 12' drops on his and he doesn't bottom it out.

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  18. #118
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    Okay. ShockWiz ride done. I flogged the hell outta it this ride. 2nd place time on a DH section of this trail that is twisty and bumpy as hell.

    The short of it is that the DPX2 is not a great shock for this bike. Iím going to eat my previous words here. Anyone that weighs over 195# will just about have to close the rebound according to the ShcokWiz.

    I got as close as I could get to an ideal tune with the adjustments on the DPX2 Performance and the ShockWiz told me to slightly decrease low speed compression (canít be done), add a small spacer (canít be done), and slightly increase high speed compression (canít be done). This was with 193psi at 33% sag. Iím going to go back at 30% sag to see how that fairs. Going any higher on the pressure would overpower the rebound.

    FWIW the bike felt better than ever, really amazing on this ride.

    Maybe an X2 or a CCDB Air with their additional adjustments would be better? Custom tuned to my fat ass that is.

    Canít wait to hear how the Super Deluxe fairs Sun. Sick looking frame BTW!!!

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I had never heard of this color before, beautiful! Enjoy the building process!

    edit: that may actually just be a baby blue/red? It kinda looks like gray/orange.
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  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Did I get the first frame only?



    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Congrats, and quoted again because it looks so nice.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    That's a valving issue plain and simple. You might have ridden on a shock that was blown out. Austen with mondraker at the demo said he does 10 and 12' drops on his and he doesn't bottom it out.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I've been riding long enough to know when a shock is clapped out, I assure you this one wasn't. Austen isn't dropping 10-12' to flat, a transition landing no matter how high is really smooth and you really don't need any suspension at all. Put plainly it's a bad litmus test for what makes "good suspension". Ever watch a slopestyle comp like crankworx in person? Lots of hard tails on REALLY big jumps.... Austen also weighs about 150lb. I have a good 50 pounds on him. FWIW the last race we were at he had 40 seconds on me total over 24 minutes of racing and the only true DH stage he had less than 1 second on me.

    Where good suspension is necessary and design comes into play is on high speed repetitive hits. Like DH and Enduro racing. Unfortunately for bigger guys and current trends there's not a whole lot of bikes out there that work ideally for this type of riding. I'm not trying to knock anyone's personal bike choice. We all ride differently. My video review above should indicate the style of riding I enjoy. I hit 37mph in that video as well. It's simply not the bike I'm looking for much like the Ibis Ripmo. Take my review for what it is, based on the video evidence presented.

  22. #122
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    Not sure why the coloring looked so weird in the above photo. It's just a blue/ red XR model.

    Superdeluxe bolts right on!

    My combo MRP bash guard/ chain guide just won't clear the frame. Just the top chain guide portion contacts the frame before it bottoms out. Thankfully chain guides are pretty redundant these days. So I just chopped off the upper chain guide portion.

    As far as suspension goes, listen valving is what primarily controls the rate of the suspension movement. The spring, air or otherwise, is an uncontrolled pogo stick without the benefit of proper shock valving. Even with way to much, spring rate doesn't do much to prevent suspension bottoming. That's not what it's for.
    If multiple small but sharp hits are bottoming it's a bit not enough HSC and/ or too much HSR.

    I will ShockWiz the bike as well. It's a tool however, not the ultimate authority I have discovered.

    Ultimately these cheap Fox components do not have speed sensitive damping, which is needed.

    My BB arrives late tomorrow so I'll get a ride in on Friday for sure.

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  23. #123
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    Cool, weíll see you in the other threads then. Thanks for letting others who shred the gnar chunder faster than 99% of the other mere mortals know that this bike isnít for them 😁😉😉

    I hope you find a bike that suits you soon. In the meantime youíll just have to continue to lose races to that flawed bike that Austin is riding. Maybe we could get some video evidence of that? 😂

    Iím goofing around of course. Have fun out there.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Cool, weíll see you in the other threads then. Thanks for letting others who shred the gnar chunder faster than 99% of the other mere mortals know that this bike isnít for them 

    I hope you find a bike that suits you soon. In the meantime youíll just have to continue to lose races to that flawed bike that Austin is riding. Maybe we could get some video evidence of that? 

    Iím goofing around of course. Have fun out there.
    Thereís always someone faster and I love chocolate (and beer). 

    To be fair there were 2 (maybe more?) disclaimers that my reviews are from the viewpoint of someone who races

  25. #125
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    To be faaaiiiirrrrr... Do you watch Letterkenny by any chance?

  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    To be faaaiiiirrrrr... Do you watch Letterkenny by any chance?

  27. #127
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    Gonna give the X2 a shot. I can get my hands on one at no cost so why not? Iíve also reached out to another shock manufacturer to see if theyíll let me demo a shock to test its compatibility.

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Gonna give the X2 a shot. I can get my hands on one at no cost so why not? Iíve also reached out to another shock manufacturer to see if theyíll let me demo a shock to test its compatibility.
    Who did you reach out to? I bet a DVO Topaz would feel great on this bike.

  29. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Who did you reach out to? I bet a DVO Topaz would feel great on this bike.
    Canít reveal who yet. DVO Topaz is very similar to a Super Deluxe so youíre probably right.

  30. #130
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    Sun_PSD, how's things? You get that thing built up yet?

  31. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Sun_PSD, how's things? You get that thing built up yet?
    So close.

    It's really my 1st bike build so after work it goes pretty slowly between the kid and the wife and all that.

    Everything is completed except the cranks (Eewings!) are not installed. I tried to install them last night but I guess they need an additional shim because they just had too much gap and it was making the chain ring incorrectly lined up. I was a pretty annoyed because it caused my chain ring to scratch my frame as a result.

    Since this happened last night I have not been able to speak to any bike shops about it, can I just go buy a 30mm spindle shim from any bike shop? Is this normal?

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  32. #132
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    Did you use a 2.5mm BB spacer in the drive side? You need a 2.5mm BB spacer between the BB and the frame and the metal 1.75mm spindle spacer that's included with the cranks. I had to get the 2.5mm spacer separately. ANy bike shop should have them.
    Here's a link to the manual (you probably have it though) We have the BSA73mm BB.

    http://www.canecreek.com/wp-content/...2018-FINAL.pdf

  33. #133
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    I used the included 1.75mm spacer on the drive side.

    I had the BB wrong! I looked at the same chart but concluded incorrectly that I only needed the 1.75mm spacer. I'll pick up a 2.5mm today (after work) and some fingernail polish for the scratch and be riding by 5 pm today.

    Thanks for that explanation as I needed that.

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I used the included 1.75mm spacer on the drive side.

    I had the BB wrong! I looked at the same chart but concluded incorrectly that I only needed the 1.75mm spacer. I'll pick up a 2.5mm today (after work) and some fingernail polish for the scratch and be riding by 5 pm today.

    Thanks for that explanation as I needed that.
    Happy to help. I accidentally used one of the thin plastic spacers instead of the 1.75mm spacers initially. It didn't cause any rubbing but it was close and didn't look right. After going through the little box again, finding the actual 1.75mm spacer and installing it everything looks (and rides) great.

  35. #135
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    Mine took considerably more spacers but it's all good now.

    Heading out for first ride now.

    So check this out: on a Park Tool scale, 28.1# with a rear noodle, real tires, XD rear rim, and Avy cartridge.
    My on bike tool kit + water bottle holder+ pedals + bash guard weighs 2.4#, so a ready to ride weight of 30.5# straight up Enduro ready.

    That's impressive.

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  36. #136
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    It is a phenomenal bicycle in every regard. I'm over the moon. It is superior to my yeti 5.5 in every measure, up, down and around.

    I really enjoy the extra confidence when descending very steep rough chutes..

    As far as the shock that I really disliked on the demo ride, the Superdeluxe with the Avalanche tune that I have is pure heaven.

    I hammered as fast as ever through repeated long fast rocky sections, and this suspension just held up beautifully The forks are considerably better as well, but the huge difference is in the shock.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It is a phenomenal bicycle in every regard. I'm over the moon. It is superior to my yeti 5.5 in every measure, up, down and around.

    I really enjoy the extra confidence when descending very steep rough chutes..

    As far as the shock that I really disliked on the demo ride, the Superdeluxe with the Avalanche tune that I have is pure heaven.

    I hammered as fast as ever through repeated long fast rocky sections, and this suspension just held up beautifully The forks are considerably better as well, but the huge difference is in the shock.
    Congrats - this has been on my list for a while...

    What size and how tall/inseam are you? Did you notice any bottom-out/blowing through travel on big hits?
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  38. #138
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    On a totally random note, a rolled up tube fits perfectly into the front triangle hole behind the head tube on the larger frames. Sadly, I cannot do this on my medium.

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheezwhip View Post
    Congrats - this has been on my list for a while...

    What size and how tall/inseam are you? Did you notice any bottom-out/blowing through travel on big hits?
    I'm 5'11" but the story is a little more complicated than that. See I lost about 3/4" of height when I shattered my spine in an MX accident. Whoops. So my arms and legs are that of a person a bit taller I suppose. Pretty sure I run 33" from the pedal to top of the seat cause I'm in to efficiency.

    That's a 175mm KS Lev dropper on the bike and it's about all I can fit. I have about 8mm showing.

    So I smashed some very rough wheel stoppers at high speed (high speed in chunder for me is like 13 mph!) , but the only drops I did were small, like 2' and less. I'll go up to about a 5' drop to flat on a couple of trails I know well but that's my current limit. The wheel stoppers just go on and on at times and are just straight up jagged, often immovable rock, which I like!

    I did not use all of my suspension nor bottom it. I definitely have more to go. About 13mm to go on the rear shock (out of 62.5 to start with) which gives me more to work with on bigger hits and bike park trips. I set my sag quick and dirty at around 30% R 20% F.

    I rolled in to a very chunky gully that I'm not sure was even part of the trail. It was about 40' rough and darn steep (not even remotely possible to walk it), and this bike gave me so much confidence I just rolled with it. I used too much front brake at one point going down and the rear tire lifted, but I just let off and kept going.

    The efficiency is mad. Remember that I took all the parts right off my Yeti 5.5, well this bike is WAY faster than the Yeti with the exact drivetrain components right down to air pressure. It is shocking. I am certain I will have some riding buddies that will be shocked too. I was maintaining a considerably higher pace in the in between sections than I ever could consistently on the Yeti.

    After the Demo I did on the stock suspension the other day I was very prepared to say 'Hey, great bike but listen SI is just better" but now that I've ridden both bikes on Avy I'd take the Foxy 5:1 over the 5.5. It's not real plush, but dang it works.

    The new Eewing cranks I just installed might be a bit wider than my old X01s, I think they are as I had to shim them a lot to remove spacing, but I also have my extended spindle pedals that I usually run on the bike and I had zero issues with calf contact on the bike frame. I bumped them when I turned around to look behind me but while actually riding, no contact at all.

    I'm just tickled with the bike and so eager to get more time on it.

    Ps. Yeti 5.5 frame for sale. $1600 shipped!

  40. #140
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    Great to hear that you love it!

    Did you use the preload spacer ring screwing it in to take up the slack? It shouldn't take more than the recommended spacers. I suppose there's room for another one but it isn't necessary.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    The efficiency is mad. Remember that I took all the parts right off my Yeti 5.5, well this bike is WAY faster than the Yeti with the exact drivetrain components right down to air pressure. It is shocking. I am certain I will have some riding buddies that will be shocked too. I was maintaining a considerably higher pace in the in between sections than I ever could consistently on the Yeti.

    After the Demo I did on the stock suspension the other day I was very prepared to say 'Hey, great bike but listen SI is just better" but now that I've ridden both bikes on Avy I'd take the Foxy 5:1 over the 5.5. It's not real plush, but dang it works.
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.

    What chainring size did you run on the SB55? I didn't like that one with a 32t or smaller chainring. Kind of demands a 36t, since it is made to race, and the anti-squat and kickback levels would be somewhat excessive with smaller. Some of the runs near me have the top 10 averaging almost 35 mph over a minute and a half; no way anyone's hitting that with a 32x10.

  42. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.
    I guess their marketing is working!

  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Great to hear that you love it!

    Did you use the preload spacer ring screwing it in to take up the slack? It shouldn't take more than the recommended spacers. I suppose there's room for another one but it isn't necessary.
    I called Cane Creek and they said " they take all different amounts of shims.
    Even though we have the exact same bike, and the same cranks, we have different BBs which I guess accounts for the difference.

    I needed 4mm on the drive side, 3mm on the drive side, and still 2 turns of the preload adjuster.

    Without the extra spacers, the rotor was right against the chainstay.

    It's fine, still pissed about the scratch though.

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  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjichor View Post
    Surprising to hear. I was under the impression that Switch Infinity is the best overall on the market.

    What chainring size did you run on the SB55? I didn't like that one with a 32t or smaller chainring. Kind of demands a 36t, since it is made to race, and the anti-squat and kickback levels would be somewhat excessive with smaller. Some of the runs near me have the top 10 averaging almost 35 mph over a minute and a half; no way anyone's hitting that with a 32x10.
    I always ran a 32. Running the same on the Foxy.

    To be blunt, you can't ride a lot of our terrain on a 36T. Yeah, I could push a 34T, but the chain line would be less ideal.

    According to Antonio's blog, 32T combined with Eagle gives you pretty good AS #s on a 5.5. But if the bike needs a 36T to work right, it's not a bike that's ideal for me.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I called Cane Creek and they said " they take all different amounts of shims.
    Even though we have the exact same bike, and the same cranks, we have different BBs which I guess accounts for the difference.

    I needed 4mm on the drive side, 3mm on the drive side, and still 2 turns of the preload adjuster.

    Without the extra spacers, the rotor was right against the chainstay.

    It's fine, still pissed about the scratch though.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Oh gotcha, I thought you picked up the same BB that I did. Bummer about the scratch.

    Iím running a 30t oval because I donít need to go 40 and I like to have a bailout gear. Talking with some of the guys at Golden Bike Shop recently they were talking about going to 28t. Is running a bigger ring a badge of honor? If it is Iíll go pick up a 36t or 38t ASAP. 😁

  46. #146
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    Many bikes seem to have better AS #s with a bigger front rotor due to the angle of the chain.
    Look on a Yeti where the top of the chain is in relation to the moving pivot on the SI. When that chain line is above the pivot, AS increases. When the chain line is below that pivot, you get a 'raising the draw bridge effect'" meaning some of your pedal power goes in to the rear shock. Of course the chain line, and therefore the AS changes everytime the bike sags or you change gears.
    According to the charts, the Foxy isn't really sensitive to gearing choice. So choose your gearing so that what ever speed you mostly operate at, results in a straight chain line to reduce friction and wear the most.
    I don't climb big mountains, but we have tough climbs everywhere here. My experience is that a 28T is too slow to maintain momentum and also makes the gears too close together for my liking. I rarely use my 50T with a 32T anyways, and I think I'll use it less now on the Foxy.

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  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Oh gotcha, I thought you picked up the same BB that I did. Bummer about the scratch.

    Iím running a 30t oval because I donít need to go 40 and I like to have a bailout gear. Talking with some of the guys at Golden Bike Shop recently they were talking about going to 28t. Is running a bigger ring a badge of honor? If it is Iíll go pick up a 36t or 38t ASAP. 😁
    Some guys use a bigger ring to have a more straight chainline and put less torque on the chain (as compared to being in the 10 ring) when hammering. It also keeps the derailleur tucked a little more.

  48. #148
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    Understood. I donít have much issue topping out the 30t. There are sections where a 32-34 would be better. I like having the easy gears for the steep technical climbs we have around here. Theyíre short but they make you work.

  49. #149
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    You make it sound like mtn bikers 5~ years ago with 2x10 have badges of honor for their chainring sizes.

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    Second ride in the books and it just so happened to be on the same trail I demoed the Foxy on before I had mine just 5 days ago.
    It's just a ripping bike man. I'm sprinting in places that I couldn't before.
    This trail pounded me on the OEM suspension but felt great today on the Avy stuff. Although not as plush as my Avy tuned 5.5.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:17 AM.

  51. #151
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    Shockwiz results from first ride with the Shockwiz on the Avy SuperDeluxe.
    Just set the sag and ran it the way Craig sent it.

    Deception is a great and bumpy trail, but it doesn't have as much harshness as some trails I ride. I suspect on the steeper yet rougher trails, the HSC will drop right in to the center.



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    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:21 AM.

  52. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    Understood. I donít have much issue topping out the 30t. There are sections where a 32-34 would be better. I like having the easy gears for the steep technical climbs we have around here. Theyíre short but they make you work.
    This bike is sooo much faster particularly on the climbs than my previous bike, That I'm doing some very steep stuff in 3rd gear and the absolute slowest of them all in 2nd.

    In time I might go to a 34T oval because I'm just going faster everywhere. I'm going to find a section of trail where I'm sort of in my power gear and I'm going to come to a stop without shifting and examine my chain line. I want that chain line to be as ideal as possible in the gears I spend most of my time on. I only topped out the old bike on pavement sections and I don't see that changing on this bike.

    We'll see.

  53. #153
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    I think it was GearTech that had the tip about moving the rear tire fender to the other sides of the tab?

    This works well. You don't even have to undo the factory zip ties as the plastic fender is so flexible that you just pop each corner of the fender around the tab placing the fender closer to the shock and further from the tire.

    With this little hack, my rear tire clearance to a 2.35 Hans Dampf went from marginal to more than enough.

    But a 2.4 tire is all this frame can comfortably handle. I have a brand new 2.5 Aggressor on the shelf that I won't be able to run.

  54. #154
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    It was someone else that made that suggestion. I looked at it, doesn't the lower portion of the fender rub on the linkage if it isn't cut?

  55. #155
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    In other news, the Float X2 fits like a glove. Can't wait to see how it feels!

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-img_8240.jpg

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    Nice!

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearTech View Post
    It was someone else that made that suggestion. I looked at it, doesn't the lower portion of the fender rub on the linkage if it isn't cut?
    That was me. The lower fender tab doesn't hit the link when moved to the other side of the mounting points. If you move it closer to the shock then you will need to trim the fender tab off. It doesn't really matter as the bottom of the fender doesn't seem to block much crap from getting onto the link.

    This bike could probably use some moto foam in front of the shock too. I've already ground down some acorns and leaves while riding.

  58. #158
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    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I'm 5'11" but the story is a little more complicated than that. See I lost about 3/4" of height when I shattered my spine in an MX accident. Whoops. So my arms and legs are that of a person a bit taller I suppose. Pretty sure I run 33" from the pedal to top of the seat cause I'm in to efficiency.
    33"? Ok, so now I understand why you wanted such a longer bike. At basically the same height, I'm at 37" from spindle to seat top.

    Glad you're loving the new bike.

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoM85BG View Post
    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco
    I believe the Alloy version was just released, the Carbon actually came first. Unless you are referring to the 27.5 version?

    There are many 205x62.5 shocks available now and I'm sure more will come available in the future since it is not such an uncommon size anymore. A shock change to the proper size poses no danger unless there is interference between the shock and frame or linkage.

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoM85BG View Post
    Hi guys,
    I'm asking you if someone has tried the alloy version, I mean the "first" model or the most affordable one...

    And also: the 205x62.5 shock is unusual, like the one mounted on the new Trek Slash (not "normal" x60 or x65)... Anyone know if a shock change will be dangerous for the rider and for the bike?
    Thanks in advance Mondrakers!
    Marco
    The Alloy Foxy 29 should ride the same, just gain a small bit of weight. Probably about 1#-1.5#, which is about the same amount it would gain going from that non-reservoir shock, to a coil shock.

    As far as the shocks go, you or your shock tuner can easily add a stroke limiting spacer as this is the same way the manufacturers limit the travel. The overall length must be 205 however. Avalanche added a machined nylon spacer for me while revalving and didn't even charge me any extra.

    The guys at Qarv (the US Mondraker distributor) actually tested a 205 x 65 shock for me (Austen, Cal and those guys are awesome) on a Foxy 29 and told me that clearance is too tight and that I needed to limit stroke to 62.5mm.

    BTW, for a trail bike, that lower air volume shock DPS that is on the alloy version is likely a better fit for this LR.

    It looks like currently the shocks you can get for this bike are currently the: DPX2, X2, the DHX2 (I just sold my take off to a guy here), DVO, and lastly you can just purchase the Rockshox Superdeluxe RC3 either take off from the Spartan or maybe someone could get Sram to sell just sell them since they are already providing them for OEM builds.

    PS. I tried to buy a shock roller bearing kit for my Foxy 29 but they are not possible. Something to do with the way the lower eyelet bolt threads in. It's a shame but I don't really care as the bike is working GREAT!

  62. #162
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    Did some ShockWizzing this afternoon with the X2. It's a great shock for this bike. I'm 220 geared up running 195psi for about 33% sag. I had some interesting findings. HSC and LSC are fully open and ShockWiz was even asking that it be open slightly more. Rebound on the other hand is only 6-7 clicks from closed for a perfect score on the Wiz. The overall score was a 96% which is pretty good. I did use all of the travel but I couldn't tell that I did. The testing included a fast heavily rooted section, a slower section with many 1'-2' rock step downs and a 4' drop at the end, repeated 5' drops at speed and sufficient pedally sections in between. I sessioned all of this about ten times. I do need to get out on a full ride with the Wiz to get a better cross section of my typical ride but for now it feels fast and stable. I need to get some good really high speed bumpy sections for testing. I have the feeling it'll ask to up the compression a bit then.

    After I recover from spending all this money on this build the X2 will be going to Avalanche to become phenomenal instead of just great.

    It's hard to describe the feeling of the suspension this bike. It's not "plush" where you are numb from what is going on underneath you but when it's dialed in you "feel" the trail and have really excellent traction everywhere. That plus the ridiculously great geometry make this a high speed weapon.

    The reviews are correct. It's fast and likes to be going fast.

  63. #163
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    Glad the X2 is working out.

    My Shockwiz took a kick from my leg today and I lost like 30psi shock pressure which wrecked a portion of my ride.

    I did use all but maybe the last 6mm of my fork stanchion tube with about 94psi in it; but the shock is good and not in danger of a hard bottom for me.

    But listen, for all the radness going fast and descending on this bike, the real story is the way it climbs, accelerates, and even goes on the flats. It's XC fast. My usual riding partner, that often has more endurance and can remain faster longer than me, is getting dropped badly in the in-between sections. Sweeping, fast, pedally sections, man I'm gone.

    I loved the turning when I demoed the Foxy, but I've struggled with the turning on my personal bike. Could be set up, my tire choice, suspension, 42 (instead of 44) offset, or just trail conditions (it's been slick). If i'm going real fast, it's a good turning bike. But with slick with tight turns it's hard to keep the bike on line, or even get it there. The bike needs to be leaned but on tight single track with trees on the inside that's tough.

    Still loving this thing. When I have my flow and am using momentum, it's real fast.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  64. #164
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    Youíre right. Itís just fast everywhere which is what makes it so exceptional. Iíve PRíd climbs and full loops on just about every ride without trying or even realizing I was going that fast.

    The flat corner turning at medium speed is something to get used to. I still donít have it down consistently. If there are trees on the inside forget about it if itís slick. I am running DHR II 2.3R 2.4wtF and it did improve the cornering everywhere vs the Aggressor. I want to move the DHR 2.4 to the rear and try a 2.5wt DHF on the front soon.

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    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 1 Week Ago at 05:34 AM.

  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    Tires are fun aren't they? Expensive though...

    Experiment with sessioning a corner that is giving you trouble. I did this over the weekend on a turn that was giving me fits and I found that I just didn't have my weight balanced correctly. There's a lot of room on this bike to move forward and back. It seems like you have to keep your weight forward a bit but not extremely so. Being low and really weighting the bike evenly or maybe a little frontward bias is working well for me. Trees on the inside line are tough, just have to find the right line if there even is one. The good thing is that if you have to take a turn a little slower the bike accelerates so quickly you can make up for it lol. That gets tiring though...

  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I tried a lot of tires on the Yeti and had settled on a DHF 3c 2.5 up front with the Aggressor 2.5 Dual in the rear but recently I decided to search for something that rolled better and gave up minimal traction.

    I thought I had found it with a Butcher front and a Hans Dampf rear (with a noodle) and in back to back testing on the Yeti I really liked the combo; but they aren't working as well for me now on the Foxy.

    I just moved the drivetrain, tires and all to the Foxy, and now i'm struggling a bit with traction front and rear. Could be because it was 98 degrees and 95% humidity when I tested the setup so we were all riding like dogs anyways. Could be because I'm just moving faster on the Foxy. Could be because trail conditions are just slicker (they are).

    Not sure yet. I do know I'm not going back to the rear 2.5 as it won't fit on this bike anyways but also it's draggy and almost more traction than I need in the rear.
    I never liked the Hans Dampf for anything other than straight lines. I still have the Aggressor out back and the DHR up front, and have had good results. My go-to tires have been E13's lately, and I've had really good luck with the Bonty XR4's too. I'll probably swap to either of these next season.

  68. #168
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    How about the e.13 TRS Race/+? Has anyone any experience with them? Been thinking of trying them out when my MaxxWearouts are toasted.

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    e13 TRS Race rolls worse than a High Roller 2 and DHF. Not sure about the Plus version, which I got the impression was the budget version.

    I know my Kenda Hellkat outdoes the e13 tires in grip and toughness (both roll pretty slow), and the Spec Eliminator is almost a Hellkat clone in tread pattern. Hellkat's my new standard to judge tires against, and the Eliminator is on my list to try after I wear out the Hellkat and try the Assegai.

  70. #170
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    It's pretty easy to get great traction. The key is to get the fastest rolling tires while having just enough traction.

    Any tire I run, I'll push it to where it begins to drift regularly.

    When I use to ride a lot by myself I'd run boat anchor tires, which really helped my novice confidence. But when you jump in these advanced group rides with a bunch or racers, you have to sprint on every in between section just to stay in the group. Managing a slight loss of grip on a decent is easy, but sprinting all out on every pedally section on slow rolling tires, will push you past your lactate threshold almost immediately, from which you will not recover from on that ride.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  71. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It's pretty easy to get great traction. The key is to get the fastest rolling tires while having just enough traction.

    Any tire I run, I'll push it to where it begins to drift regularly.

    When I use to ride a lot by myself I'd run boat anchor tires, which really helped my novice confidence. But when you jump in these advanced group rides with a bunch or racers, you have to sprint on every in between section just to stay in the group. Managing a slight loss of grip on a decent is easy, but sprinting all out on every pedally section on slow rolling tires, will push you past your lactate threshold almost immediately, from which you will not recover from on that ride.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    Sounds like youíre doing cross country rides on a 150/160 travel bike?

  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I never liked the Hans Dampf for anything other than straight lines. I still have the Aggressor out back and the DHR up front, and have had good results. My go-to tires have been E13's lately, and I've had really good luck with the Bonty XR4's too. I'll probably swap to either of these next season.
    I've tried them 3x now (rear only) and the newest one is working pretty well for me so far as a great rolling, pretty good traction tire. But trail conditions have been iffy so the jury is still out.
    They have a rep as tearing easily, but I damage tires much less these days and run a noodle as my 'get home plan'. No problems so far.

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  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    Sounds like youíre doing cross country rides on a 150/160 travel bike?
    Not even close. But we have to pedal a lot. We don't have huge descents here. The longest are maybe 10 min and still require plenty of pedaling to go your fastest.
    I watched your video, if you took the roughest of that terrain, and often rougher, it's like that but rolling the entire time, up and down.

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  75. #175
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    Pretty typical Foxy review. Very capable and fast bike. But if you are looking for the best bike, well it's not at a great price. I'm glad I went frame only for sure.

    I'm crazy for mine. Really enjoying the heck out of it. And I've definitely learned to turn the thing well.

    My talent or bravery has not improved (well maybe marginally more brave) on this bike, but overall speed on a trail is notably faster.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-l-foxy-29-28.2-.jpg

  76. #176
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    Last update for a while from me.

    I am braver on this bike. Went to a trail that has given me fits the few times I rode it before. It's got some very steep rocky descends that go on for about 20 seconds or so (I'm sure that's short to other people). Too steep to stop or even slow down much, have to execute a couple of curves and if you don't you are going to nail a tree or rock and going to have a long tumble down. Basically once you start there is no stopping. No problem on the Foxy! The bike's geometry just inspires confidence. This was something I specifically was looking to remedy with this purchase and it worked for me. I found the Yeti 5.5 had me feeling perched up a bit high, awkward, and forward and this effected my confidence a lot on steeps. No longer a problem.

    I'm still working on a good feel for a solid manual on the bike (radically different stem and bike length makes this more different than I expected) and as a novice doing drops up to about 5' on the previous Yeti, well I'm still working up to it on the Mondraker. But what I've done (3'ers), it handles them beautifully and I look forward to getting back to where I was and beyond in this regard.

    Climbing and the flat in between sections were another part of my skills that were lacking and I wanted something that climbed better than the Yeti 5.5 I had, which is no easy task. I have been a good explosive short term rocky climber for some time, but the sustained stuff would have me passing out from exhaustion. No more! This bike is insanely efficient and really gives me the gusto to push on the flats and longer climbs. It's noticeable. I have a regular riding partner that 3 weeks ago was smoking me on the pedally sections if they went on for more than 2-3 minutes. Well this has been reversed and I spent plenty of time waiting for him the last 2 times we rode, with me on the Foxy. It's not a small difference and I really got my money's worth in regard to the Foxy helping me with my riding shortcomings.

    Who says you can't buy yourself faster? I sure did!

    Oh, and my Avy suspension front and rear is flippin' awesome. I have still not used the last 3-4mm of my rear shock or the last 10mm of the forks, so that's my reserve for the bigger drops I guess.

  77. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Is this really true? I have a couple of riding buddies that are north of 200, one is quite a bit, and they haven't had to send out their shocks for custom tuning. One bike is an Evil and the other a Santa Cruz. The SC did get a volume spacer though. Not saying you are wrong, just genuinely curious if this is industry standard.
    At 200lbs for the corect spring/air on most bikes the rebound wasnt enough. Same for forks. Compression is hit or miss, most suspention components wont blow off compression enough (HSC)you're using a lot of LSC.

    A lot of people get used to their bike, but it doesnt mean its optimal.

  78. #178
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    Question for those with the bike. How do you feel about the stack height? My medium feels about an 1" too low for me to ride comfortably on long trips. On short rides I don't notice it as much. I will be adding a riser bar (maybe 50mm) to the cockpit over the winter to see how this changes things up for next season.

  79. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Question for those with the bike. How do you feel about the stack height? My medium feels about an 1" too low for me to ride comfortably on long trips. On short rides I don't notice it as much. I will be adding a riser bar (maybe 50mm) to the cockpit over the winter to see how this changes things up for next season.
    I run my stem nearly slammed but I've always ran 40mm rise Renthal bars. I do this to increase Reach on all my bikes.

    Using the exact same components from my Yeti, the Mondraker actually has the bars slightly higher than I remember my Yeti being in relation to the seat.

    On edit: the Foxy has 4mm MORE stack height than my previous Yeti 5.5.
    Last edited by Suns_PSD; 2 Days Ago at 09:35 AM.

  80. #180
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    It's no biggie, but I get a little rear tire rub.
    I'm running a rear XD Nobl TR36 (30mm ID) wheel laced up with Sapim spokes.
    Tire is the newest Hans Dampf 2.35 and it measures an actual 2.46!

    I'm currently experimenting with my lowest pressure yet at 26psi (I weigh 180#) and this is only possible due to me running a rear tire noodle (Pepi's).

    I'm more than decent through the rough fast turns.

    Just an FYI.

    New mondraker foxy carbon 29-20181117_080730.jpeg

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  81. #181
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    So is anyone going to try out the included front offset to try a 65 degree head angle for shredding, or maybe even the 67 degree for trail riding?

    Curious if anyone has experimented with the former.

  82. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    So is anyone going to try out the included front offset to try a 65 degree head angle for shredding, or maybe even the 67 degree for trail riding?

    Curious if anyone has experimented with the former.
    Isn't the adjustable geo only available on the frameset and the XR complete? I know it can be purchased separately, I but haven't seen the need for it yet? Do you have pics of the kit? How does it work?

  83. #183
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    Hey there!
    I'm currently riding an alloy Foxy R 2016 and I would really want to do an upgrade for 2019. I am after more efficiency and rollover from 29 inch wheels, but I would also appreciate a more compliant fork and rear end.
    I'm a bit worried that the Foxy 29 will be just as harsh-ish as my current rig.
    Any insights from users who had Dunes or Foxys and now got the Foxy 29?
    I'm also curious if the relatively high BB on paper feels high on steep descents.
    And what do you guys experienced with coil on the new Foxy?
    Right now I'm kind of puzzled if to get a Capra 29 or a Foxy29.

  84. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Isn't the adjustable geo only available on the frameset and the XR complete? I know it can be purchased separately, I but haven't seen the need for it yet? Do you have pics of the kit? How does it work?
    I'm not at my shop but it's just a couple of offset cups that you install in the steer tube.



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  85. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    Hey there!
    I'm currently riding an alloy Foxy R 2016 and I would really want to do an upgrade for 2019. I am after more efficiency and rollover from 29 inch wheels, but I would also appreciate a more compliant fork and rear end.
    I'm a bit worried that the Foxy 29 will be just as harsh-ish as my current rig.
    Any insights from users who had Dunes or Foxys and now got the Foxy 29?
    I'm also curious if the relatively high BB on paper feels high on steep descents.
    And what do you guys experienced with coil on the new Foxy?
    Right now I'm kind of puzzled if to get a Capra 29 or a Foxy29.
    I only demoed a stock Foxy 29 1 day before I picked up my own frameset.

    The demo bike suspension was really harsh. But for my own Foxy 29 I had purchased my own suspension and had it revalved by Avalanche Racing. The suspension is beautiful front and rear. The rear end seemed a bit more firm/ supportive than my previous Yeti 5.5, which feels just perfect.

    I never rode on the stock coil shock that came on mine. I really wanted to but needed to be able to sell it as a new take off. The guy that bought it in the UK maybe can report back on it's performance compared to his DPX air shock as I know he lurks here. I'm sure the coil really sucks up trail chatter but also lacks big hit capability. Which may not matter to you.

    As far as efficiency and roll over goes, the Foxy 29 is positively outstanding in this regard. I love the efficiency, what a difference!

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  86. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post

    The demo bike suspension was really harsh. But for my own Foxy 29 I had purchased my own suspension and had it revalved by Avalanche Racing. The suspension is beautiful front and rear. The rear end seemed a bit more firm/ supportive than my previous Yeti 5.5, which feels just perfect.


    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    I am really curious what that revalving actually means, and if I could do that at my LBS or service in Romania. The last thing I want after such a purchase is a harsh ride. Actually, that's from what I'm trying to run from.
    I would go for the XR alloy, with Lyrik up front and swap the coil for a super deluxe.

  87. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Cristescu View Post
    I am really curious what that revalving actually means, and if I could do that at my LBS or service in Romania. The last thing I want after such a purchase is a harsh ride. Actually, that's from what I'm trying to run from.
    I would go for the XR alloy, with Lyrik up front and swap the coil for a super deluxe.
    Revalving is a very common process on motorcycles. Just about any race prepped motorcycle is going to be revalved.

    On a MTB, these shocks are off the shelf units that either have a soft/ medium/ or hard valving stack. The valving stack is in the simplest terms, a set of orifices that oil is forced through to control the rate at which the shock moves. This is the manufacturer getting as close as they can at a very reasonable price. After all Fox is not going to custom tune shocks for specific applications, size bikes, and needs. Even if they could the cost would be outrageous. They are not in the business of creating unlimited part numbers after all, hard to make money doing that.

    Since Avalanche (there might be Euro equivalents) manufacturers new internal components, and has testing equipment, this is not something a bike shop can replicate. If they say they can, I'd question them.

    I don't know if the Foxy demo with the air shock I rode was just set in a manner that I didn't like, or if they all ride like that stock.

    If I lived in Romania and $$ wasn't such a big issue, I'd assess my riding preferences. If you ride tons of chunder but aren't concerned with drops over say 4' or significant jumps, I'd order the Coil XR and be done. Or they have a real nice aftermarket Coil shock in Europe (name escapes me) that has a hydraulic bottom out control, that would be amazing on the Foxy imo. In that case you could just buy the R version, and order whatever shock you wanted.

    You also have the option of tracking down a shock in the USA, having it shipped directly to Avy, then having them send it to you.

    I think you will be fine with the stock forks, but you can ride whatever the bike comes with and just start working on getting the shock you want.

    Good luck!

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Revalving is a very common process on motorcycles. Just about any race prepped motorcycle is going to be revalved.

    On a MTB, these shocks are off the shelf units that either have a soft/ medium/ or hard valving stack. The valving stack is in the simplest terms, a set of orifices that oil is forced through to control the rate at which the shock moves. This is the manufacturer getting as close as they can at a very reasonable price. After all Fox is not going to custom tune shocks for specific applications, size bikes, and needs. Even if they could the cost would be outrageous. They are not in the business of creating unlimited part numbers after all, hard to make money doing that.

    Since Avalanche (there might be Euro equivalents) manufacturers new internal components, and has testing equipment, this is not something a bike shop can replicate. If they say they can, I'd question them.

    I don't know if the Foxy demo with the air shock I rode was just set in a manner that I didn't like, or if they all ride like that stock.

    If I lived in Romania and $$ wasn't such a big issue, I'd assess my riding preferences. If you ride tons of chunder but aren't concerned with drops over say 4' or significant jumps, I'd order the Coil XR and be done. Or they have a real nice aftermarket Coil shock in Europe (name escapes me) that has a hydraulic bottom out control, that would be amazing on the Foxy imo. In that case you could just buy the R version, and order whatever shock you wanted.

    You also have the option of tracking down a shock in the USA, having it shipped directly to Avy, then having them send it to you.

    I think you will be fine with the stock forks, but you can ride whatever the bike comes with and just start working on getting the shock you want.

    Good luck!
    Thanks so much for your thorough explanation. Really appreciated.
    Yeah, I'm more concerned on small to medium bump compliance, as I don't do that much jumps, only on the small side and negligible in number, that's why I would go for the coil.
    On the other hand, I do some bike trips a few times a year, that require me to ride with a larger backpack instead of my usual hip pack, and that adds quite some weight which might make me move to a harder spring. The thing is that it seems rather complicated to do that every now and then.

  89. #189
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    Order the XR, you'll love it. Don't worry about changing the spring.
    If you find faults, work on getting a killer air shock at your own pace.

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