New to Clipless- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 46 of 46

Thread: New to Clipless

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    538

    New to Clipless

    So i have some questions that need answering before i commit.

    1. can different company shoes and pedals mix and fit well, and what will be the consequences of mixing brands -will it be harder to remove, more "float" (so i believe it called) and what not.

    2. I believe you can adjust the postion of the mechanism on the bottom of the shoe, is that correct?

    3. Are shimano shoes and pedals typically a good place to start (i'm looking at the M088 shoes and the M530 pedals, reviews would be helpful)

    Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    538
    Oh, and could Bontrager shoes be used with the M785 or m530 shimano pedals?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    325
    Most MTB shoes can be used with most MTB pedals. The shoe comes with screw holes in the bottom, and for MTB there's usually 2 of them. Road shoes come in 2 or 3 hole which is more confusing as the two aren't cross compatible.

    The amount of float is determined by the cleat and pedal you select not the shoe. Pedals generally come with the appropriate cleats, although sometimes you can purchase cleats as accessories or replacements (they do wear out over time) with more or less float if you want.

    The most common cleat is probably shimano SPD but there's a lot of other good choices too. The M530s are a great choice, but understand the cage/platform is more for additional support when clipping in and out etc., its not really meant to be dual purpose and used with traditional shoes as the mechanism will protrude into your foot. Not that you didn't know this, but that's a common misconception. If you're looking to ease the transition with a pedal that can be used as clipless or flat, look at something like the PD-A530, though I do think its better to just dive in and switch.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    325
    Oh, and yes, you can adjust the position. Forward/backward, inside/outside, and toe-in/toe-out are adjustable on most any cleat and shoe combination, but there might be exceptions.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EatsDirt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,188
    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasF View Post

    3. Are shimano shoes and pedals typically a good place to start (i'm looking at the M088 shoes and the M530 pedals, reviews would be helpful)
    M088 / M530 is the kit I picked up a few months ago as I was on a tight budget. In the past I've always ridden higher end shoes/pedals... was a little concerned with quality, mostly with engagement/release of pedals. No complaints at all. Had a few pretty hard rock strikes and they're fine. Shoe sole could probably be a little stiffer but they seem to be a good value.

    Hope that helps...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charging_rhinos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,841
    I personally don't really like Shimano's SPD system very much. This will piss off a lot of people, as SPD fans seem to be a rather volatile group, given other threads on MTBR. My first complaint: Mud clearance. If you ride in the mud, they can clog up quite fast if you clip out. Yes, they've gotten much better in recent years, but they still are on the bottom of the pile when it comes to mud clearance. A lot of people like the adjustable tension feature, but I have yet to meet anyone who actually adjusts their pedals after finding a medium-ish setting that works. All other pedals that I can think of are designed with proper tension from the factory and thus don't need adjustable tension at all. Not a selling point at all, IMO. Lastly, and most importantly to me is float. For my knees, having some float is absolutely necessary, and SPDs have pretty much zero float. Your feet are locked in at a certain angle, and that's it. You try and twist your foot even a little bit, and you're already starting to open up the clip-out mechanism. Having float doesn't make clipping out any more difficult, and it allows me to reposition my feet ever so slightly throughout longer rides while remaining securely clipped in. That little bit of repositioning really helps me with inflammation caused by repetitive motion.

    Crank Brothers pedals have probably the best mud clearance. They also have a lot of float to them. That is a good thing in my opinion, as I mentioned before. They're also SO much easier than SPDs to clip into in a hurry (think starting on a steep hill). The problem with Crank Bros in the past has been reliability. Their products are usually 80% great, 20% complete crap. Some have had issues with CB pedals, but I haven't for the past 4 years with my Mallet DHs. I've never had a single issue. They've always been very reliable, very durable, and effortless to clip into and out of. If they were complete garbage as people sometimes say, there wouldn't be so many pro racers using them in the enduro and DH disciplines. I hear of people saying they can pre-release when hitting rocks, but that's never happened to me once. Just don't ham-fist through rocks and pedal smart.

    If you really want the best of all worlds: reliability, durability, and ease of clipping in, have a look at Time pedals. They are fantastic. Mud clearance very similar to CB pedals, very good track record with durability. A bit more pricey sometimes, but honestly worth it. My friend has been on his Time Atacs for ~11 years, and aside from having to replace worn cleats every year or two, they have performed flawlessly. If I didn't already have my Mallet DHs, I'd probably get some Times.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
    rck18: All of them, because they're meat.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    325
    I don't think your words should bother anyone, you're pretty much spot on about mud clearance and tension adjustment. Another pro of the crank brothers, especially for XC racers, is the lightness. I would probably be on egg beaters if my LBS didn't stop carrying them.

    I disagree about the float aspect though. I believe MTB SPDs have 6 deg of float. While that may not be enough for you, and nobody can fault you for that (especially with knee problems), it's a lot different than zero float.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    389
    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    If you really want the best of all worlds: reliability, durability, and ease of clipping in, have a look at Time pedals. They are fantastic. Mud clearance very similar to CB pedals, very good track record with durability. A bit more pricey sometimes, but honestly worth it. My friend has been on his Time Atacs for ~11 years, and aside from having to replace worn cleats every year or two, they have performed flawlessly. If I didn't already have my Mallet DHs, I'd probably get some Times.
    I replaced my XT's with the cheapo new model Time MX4's (same pedal as the new Mavics, but cheaper..), no problems in mud and no problems adjusting to them after SPD's for 3 years, control and platform support is better too for my softer soled AM shoes.

    Can't say anything about durability since I've had them only for 2 months or so.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    104
    Big fan of both crank bros (candy sl) on my mtn bike and time (rxs) on my road bike. Having float as an option is a good thing for your knees.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    103
    One advantage of adjustable tension is that if you are new to clipless you can set the tension really low and slowly increase it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charging_rhinos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,841
    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith11 View Post
    One advantage of adjustable tension is that if you are new to clipless you can set the tension really low and slowly increase it.
    I guess that's true, but I've never felt that other pedals held me in too aggressively, even when I was new to clipless. It only took a day or two to get used to whatever tension the clips were set at. And the thought of having a very low-tension clippy setup kinda scares me, as I'm fully expecting not to pre-release, but a a certain point that does become a factor. Others may have different experiences though. To each their own. I'll stick with my Mallets (or flats as I've been using more and more lately).
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
    rck18: All of them, because they're meat.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    62
    i have shimano SPD mountain bike shoes ive used with my crankbrothers eggbeaters for the last 4 years and recently switched to some smartys i picked up used off of craigslist. the added platform + clipless feels so much better. very stable and easy to get out of in a hurry when you need to

  13. #13
    WillWorkForTrail
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4,714
    I've never used CB pedals, but I've seen a lot of them fall apart with friends using them. I have used Shimano pedals, and I have noticed that they can have some mud issues. A little over a year ago, I switched one of my primary bikes over to an SPD compatible pedal from Xpedo (MF4) and would point out: It's lighter than high end Shimano pedals, clears mud way, way better, appears to be more durable, AND has more float. The kicker is, you should be able to pick up a set of Xpedos for very reasonable prices compared to similar pedals.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    89
    +1 on eggbeaters!

    I started off with a pair of Mallet C pedals from them. They have a large platform and they worked great. Recently got a pair without the giant platform and love them.

  15. #15
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,776
    I use SPD's of all kind of brands- mix and match is no problem.

    Just got my wife away from flat pedals. A friend of mine noticed straight away that the Xpedo SPD pedals (on the wifey's badass single speed) are super easy to unclip from as they can be set to much lower tension than Shimano XT and XTR pedals.

    I see a lot of people using Egg Beaters and I've helped a few of them locate parts that have flown off on occasion
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    327
    I have had significant experience with 3 major clipless systems - SPD (Shimano), Time and CB.
    Time are as durable as it gets but they are the worst in clip-in/release consistency in my opinion.
    Shimano are probably the best for new user as they provide clockwork-like precision in engagement/release - and their pressure adjustment does work.
    I personally use CB Mallet DH now - they work wonderfully for aggressive riding (jumping, significant angulation of feet when cornering etc). With metal "shoe protection" plate CB sells separately their engagement/release consistency is between Time (worst) and Shimano (best).

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ride-beer-rinse-repeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    305
    I'll also have to give a nod to Time. I had used Crank Brothers for years and didn't have any real issues, but I did notice others having problems with durability. Plus the mallets tended to have clip in difficulties with heavy muck due to the platform.

    I switched to Time and love them. As stated earlier, the overall clip in consistency may not be as good as Shimano, but where I ride one frequently has to clip in with shoes caked in mud and junk, and Time has never let me down in that respect. Also, I tend to get tingly feet after long spins, and the extra float helps me move my foot around and relieve it, so that's another plus for me over Shimano.
    "Get busy living, or get busy dying"

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    562
    Sorry to steal the thread, but does anyone have a favorite for crash/panic release? Can the Shimanos be set loose enough so I can just yank my foot out if need be (or if the physics of a journey OTB recommends it)?
    2014 Trek Remedy 8 29er
    2003 Gary Fisher X-Caliber

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    103
    Shimanos can definately be set really loose (at least mine can, which I did get used..). I wouldn't recommend it, you'll pull your foot out all the time and then it's really sketchy. Nice if you are new to clipless and just learning to use it but you'll quickly ramp up the release tension a lot.

  20. #20
    Clueless Bastard
    Reputation: WA-CO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    684
    I had SPD before I went to Crank Bros, after one season of racing cyclocross, and NOT being able to clip in, egg beaters were just gaining popularity. I raced the next 6 years in them, never a problem getting in and out.

    Will totally agree, that sometimes, Egg Beaters (or their sister pedals) can have QC issues. It never really bothered me, they've never left me stranded or in a pinch. All my bikes have Egg Beaters, an I keep an extra pair of Candy pedals in my parts bin, just in case.

    Egg Beaters don't technically have any float, but they are so easy to get in and out of. I have known a couple of riders who claim to be able to pull out of Egg Beaters, but I've never seen it actually happen.

    I know for me, pedals are kinda like saddles and tires. Each rider will find their own favorite, and have a tendency to stick with it.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 2clue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,391
    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Mumphry View Post
    Sorry to steal the thread, but does anyone have a favorite for crash/panic release? Can the Shimanos be set loose enough so I can just yank my foot out if need be (or if the physics of a journey OTB recommends it)?
    In general, every system will eject you under a crash. Even the road pedals, which are designed to retain you at all cost disengage in a crash. As for ease of exiting and clicking back in, that is something you will learn to do on the dime regardless of the system once you are use to it. I can unclip, dab, and clip back in one quick smooth motion on my Crankbrothers. I have seen others do the same with Shimano, Time, and heck even speedplays. Basically get the one you like the most, they are all pedals and work.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    392
    I am also thinking about clipless pedals but I am hesitant to pull the trigger. I understand the positives and I think that I will be just fine in 80% of my riding but mtb means also discovering new trails and sometimes there can be some really difficult parts that I won't feel safe to ride them clipped in or if I stop it would be impossible to clip in again.

    So I am still holding back. Maybe I will put clipless pedals in my back up mtb and see how I will manage it.

  23. #23
    Zaf
    Zaf is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Zaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    526
    It's a practice thing. I don't have any troubles pulling my foot out to dab with clipless pedals when needed, nor had trouble clipping back in. After time, the way you release your foot becomes very instinctive process, you will occasionally fall because you can't get your feet out, everyone has these stories. I'd say give it a go if you're interested, it doesn't cost a lot to set yourself up with decent pedals and shoes.

    I thought that I'd be more hesitant with them, that thought of not being able to bail from the bike as easily, but in the end it made me commit to lines a bit more and ride things out . That's my experience with them at least, clipless feels great for me, so I have no trouble recommending.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,816
    Quote Originally Posted by gsmith11 View Post
    Shimanos can definately be set really loose (at least mine can, which I did get used..). I wouldn't recommend it, you'll pull your foot out all the time and then it's really sketchy. Nice if you are new to clipless and just learning to use it but you'll quickly ramp up the release tension a lot.

    Not true, I've been using spds forever and set the tension as low as possible and the only time I ever inadvertently unclip is if I move my heel in or out too far- usually when getting squirrly on a techie section. Normal riding (pulling up, hammering, whatever) I have never had a cleat pull out.

  25. #25
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,416
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Not true, I've been using spds forever and set the tension as low as possible and the only time I ever inadvertently unclip is if I move my heel in or out too far- usually when getting squirrly on a techie section. Normal riding (pulling up, hammering, whatever) I have never had a cleat pull out.
    Correct, the mechanism, under normal working standards, requires you to pivot the heel in or out by a specific degree to disengage the mechanism. If you are able to pull up and release the mechanism without an pivot then your cleats are too worn and need to be replaced.


    OP - Inevitably falling is all part of the "Rite of Passage" of having clipless on your bike. Whether it happens often or not is up to your situation at hand and other variables. If you have never ridden clipless before DO NOT just set it to the lightest setting and hit the trails, you are better off finding a nice grassy patch somewhere and doing a bit of practicing clipping in and out and then riding and clipping in and out as you pedal around. This gets you used to the motion and thus will HELP with you doing better in the future. I have been riding clipless for 3yrs now and inevitably have a fall every year at least once where I was unable to clip out. Sometimes this fall is at a stoplight while I am trying to trackstand and other times it is right after I have pushed off on the trail and suddenly lose momentum. Ultimately it ends up that you are falling to the side you are trying to unclip and do not have the proper leverage.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DrewBird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,392
    All the info on this thread is spot-on, and very helpful. I've ridden all major systems over the years, plus various road clipless. My fave is Shimano, mainly because I like the very consistent clip in/out feel. 6 degree heel twist and CLICK you're out. I find Time and CB, which rely on a soft metal cleat being pinched by springs, to get pretty vague after a while.

    I will, however, but the first on this thread to throw out the idea of "new gen" flats. Canfield Crampon Ultimate or RF Atlas pedals plus FiveTen Freerider XVi or similar shoes. This combo is very light, very easy to walk in, and most importantly give you great power transfer and security with instant bail-out ability.

    I certainly don't mean (or plan to) re-litigate the flats vs. clipless debate, but I've been very impressed with the pedaling performance of these thin-and-light pedals and stiff but sticky shoes. I'd pick these for anything short of XC racing.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,558
    I have been riding Flats exclusively for 4 years now, but still keep a pair of Time ATAC in my bin just in case. Of all the clipless pedals I tried, I preferred Time over Crank brothers. These are mostly personal preferences, try looking for something on sale or used and give a brand a try, see what you like. For example, try the xpeedo as a cheaper version of SPD, get a cheap set of CBs, can't remember what they call them, Candy? Get a used Time set. not all at once, but just get the cheaper models and dip your feet.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    392
    What type terrain and trails do you ride? Sometimes I ride really tight trails with small cliffs on one side, so if something goes wrong it is important to be able to leave the bike ASAP. Also when doing XC rides an occasional fall maybe OK but in really tough trails I dont want to have one more thing to worry about.

  29. #29
    Inspector Gadget
    Reputation: abeckstead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    729
    Shimano sh-56 multi-release cleats are your best friend when starting out. I found out about them somewhere on here when I started with clipless about 2 years ago. I still use them and leave the pedal tension pretty loose. I use the shimano m647 pedal, they are really easy to get clipped back in. Never had problems un-clipping when I didn't want them too... It's technique and learning how to weight your feet properly.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    392
    Thank you for the suggestion. I think that i will give them a try. When we say multi directional what does it mean exactly?

  31. #31
    Zaf
    Zaf is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Zaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    526
    Quote Originally Posted by Paris Galanis View Post
    Thank you for the suggestion. I think that i will give them a try. When we say multi directional what does it mean exactly?
    Means if you desperately jerk your leg upwards it lets your foot go.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    320
    New to clipless, wear elbow guards! :-)

  33. #33
    Inspector Gadget
    Reputation: abeckstead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    729

    New to Clipless

    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    Means if you desperately jerk your leg upwards it lets your foot go.
    Which is a natural reaction your body does during an endo or loopout backwards... Although this doesn't seem to work on endo's uphill... :ranoutoftalent: lol
    It's the perfect time of year, Somewhere far away from here.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sleepyguy1001's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike123456 View Post
    New to clipless, wear elbow guards! :-)
    And shin guards in case you fall over onto gravel. Not that I'd know anything about it of course. LOL Just starting to work with them, pulled up to a road and had to slow way down because I couldn't see anything in either direction, and fell right over onto the gravel. My shin took the brunt of the fall somehow and I got to explain to some nice guy in his car that I was actually just fine.
    We have met the enemy, and it is us. Pogo

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    I personally don't really like Shimano's SPD system very much. This will piss off a lot of people, as SPD fans seem to be a rather volatile group, given other threads on MTBR. My first complaint: Mud clearance. If you ride in the mud, they can clog up quite fast if you clip out. Yes, they've gotten much better in recent years, but they still are on the bottom of the pile when it comes to mud clearance. A lot of people like the adjustable tension feature, but I have yet to meet anyone who actually adjusts their pedals after finding a medium-ish setting that works. All other pedals that I can think of are designed with proper tension from the factory and thus don't need adjustable tension at all. Not a selling point at all, IMO. Lastly, and most importantly to me is float. For my knees, having some float is absolutely necessary, and SPDs have pretty much zero float. Your feet are locked in at a certain angle, and that's it. You try and twist your foot even a little bit, and you're already starting to open up the clip-out mechanism. Having float doesn't make clipping out any more difficult, and it allows me to reposition my feet ever so slightly throughout longer rides while remaining securely clipped in. That little bit of repositioning really helps me with inflammation caused by repetitive motion.

    Crank Brothers pedals have probably the best mud clearance. They also have a lot of float to them. That is a good thing in my opinion, as I mentioned before. They're also SO much easier than SPDs to clip into in a hurry (think starting on a steep hill). The problem with Crank Bros in the past has been reliability. Their products are usually 80% great, 20% complete crap. Some have had issues with CB pedals, but I haven't for the past 4 years with my Mallet DHs. I've never had a single issue. They've always been very reliable, very durable, and effortless to clip into and out of. If they were complete garbage as people sometimes say, there wouldn't be so many pro racers using them in the enduro and DH disciplines. I hear of people saying they can pre-release when hitting rocks, but that's never happened to me once. Just don't ham-fist through rocks and pedal smart.

    If you really want the best of all worlds: reliability, durability, and ease of clipping in, have a look at Time pedals. They are fantastic. Mud clearance very similar to CB pedals, very good track record with durability. A bit more pricey sometimes, but honestly worth it. My friend has been on his Time Atacs for ~11 years, and aside from having to replace worn cleats every year or two, they have performed flawlessly. If I didn't already have my Mallet DHs, I'd probably get some Times.
    The reason why SPD guys seem volatile is because of posts like yours. Your tone alone riles them up. I disagree that mud clearance is that bad. Yes it does suck compared to EBs but EB's have the longevity of lightning and they are more expensive. I can't speak for Candys or Mallets since I don't frequent the trail or AM scene much but at that point you might as well get the SPDs with platform if mud clearance is your primary concern. The whole point of the adjustable tension is not to use it repeatedly but to get it to a sweet spot that suits your feet. It's not something the biker would be fiddling with every week or month perpetually. This tension adjustment is a big selling point for those who are new to clipless pedals and who have varying ankle strength. I agree that a bit of float would help but not everybody wants or even needs it. Some even feel uncomfortable with it. In my case a bit of toe-out took care of the need for float.

    Just reading another thread about Time ATACs. They aren't without problems either. Their warranty is great. But if it means sending it to France and waiting over a month to get back the same pedals with just the faulty component fixed, then I want to have nothing to do with the company.
    '11 Epic Comp, Shimano SPD M780, Giant Contact Switch-R, Specialized Ribcage, Bontrager Trip 200, Ergon GS1

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyguy1001 View Post
    And shin guards in case you fall over onto gravel. Not that I'd know anything about it of course. LOL Just starting to work with them, pulled up to a road and had to slow way down because I couldn't see anything in either direction, and fell right over onto the gravel. My shin took the brunt of the fall somehow and I got to explain to some nice guy in his car that I was actually just fine.
    Practice on grass, I did that every night with nobody watching. Reduce the tension if they are SPDs.
    '11 Epic Comp, Shimano SPD M780, Giant Contact Switch-R, Specialized Ribcage, Bontrager Trip 200, Ergon GS1

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    Means if you desperately jerk your leg upwards it lets your foot go.
    Are you sure about this? I thought it meant you can twist your ankle outwards AND inwards to release whereas omni direction is only outwards.
    '11 Epic Comp, Shimano SPD M780, Giant Contact Switch-R, Specialized Ribcage, Bontrager Trip 200, Ergon GS1

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: xlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by Paris Galanis View Post
    I am also thinking about clipless pedals but I am hesitant to pull the trigger. I understand the positives and I think that I will be just fine in 80% of my riding but mtb means also discovering new trails and sometimes there can be some really difficult parts that I won't feel safe to ride them clipped in or if I stop it would be impossible to clip in again.

    So I am still holding back. Maybe I will put clipless pedals in my back up mtb and see how I will manage it.
    I was in your shoes a few months ago. Now I am in my clipless pedals. You have to just dive right in. Buy used if you aren't sure. For what I need, I absolutely love clipless. I'm never going back.
    '11 Epic Comp, Shimano SPD M780, Giant Contact Switch-R, Specialized Ribcage, Bontrager Trip 200, Ergon GS1

  39. #39
    Inspector Gadget
    Reputation: abeckstead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    729

    New to Clipless

    Quote Originally Posted by xlash View Post
    Are you sure about this? I thought it meant you can twist your ankle outwards AND inwards to release whereas omni direction is only outwards.
    You can definitely get out with a knee jerk. For example: I've noticed that's how I get out when I'm about to crash in a turn (washout). I've also un clipped that way looping my bike out.

    Still they are more user friendly especially for a beginner. Two of my friends just went clip less and didn't start with the sh-56's. After I told them they couldn't believe how much of a difference they made.
    It's the perfect time of year, Somewhere far away from here.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    I thought that I'd be more hesitant with them, that thought of not being able to bail from the bike as easily, but in the end it made me commit to lines a bit more and ride things out . That's my experience with them at least, clipless feels great for me, so I have no trouble recommending.
    I have to agree. I just went clipless, and did my first ride in them today. I like to ride fast, technical single track, and found that I was paying a lot more attention to the trail, and gear selection before climbs. Even had one really rutted, rooted climb that is a bit iffy descending almost make me stop and hike it. Instead I just powered up it, carefully picking my line and easily cleaned it. Even noticed at the top that I was in a higher gear than I typically would of used with flats.

    Of course I did fall a few times, gave a little blood to the trail gods, and only had to tell one mtnb'r that I was just getting used to CL after I fell over while trying to trail stand.

  41. #41
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,416
    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingDaVinci View Post
    Of course I did fall a few times, gave a little blood to the trail gods, and only had to tell one mtnb'r that I was just getting used to CL after I fell over while trying to trail stand.
    All part of the learning experience and a required yearly offering to said gods.
    You will get used to them quickly and just like Flying said, you find that you are committing to things and paying more attention to trail features. You are not completely locked in to the pedals, like most people think and fear, but rather it is a conceded effort to get out of them. This in turn makes you pay more attention to what you are doing, where you are aimed and what lies ahead of you.

    As said before, best thing is to find yourself a nice grassy area to practice on and go at it a few times. That and realize that YOU WILL FALL, it is just an inevitable happening if you have other clipless riders around you when it happens they will laugh but all know the pains when you do and will offer you a helping hand.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charging_rhinos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,841
    Quote Originally Posted by xlash View Post
    The reason why SPD guys seem volatile is because of posts like yours. Your tone alone riles them up.
    Just stating my opinion, and not doing so in an argumentative tone at all. Rest assured, I have no anger at all toward SPDs or their owners. I just think they are not a very good product, and that there are better options out there. That's the long and short of it.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
    rck18: All of them, because they're meat.

  43. #43
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,686
    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    I personally don't really like Shimano's SPD system very much. This will piss off a lot of people, as SPD fans seem to be a rather volatile group, given other threads on MTBR. My first complaint: Mud clearance. If you ride in the mud, they can clog up quite fast if you clip out.
    What, the mud clearing design where it just pushes through that shimano has used for the last 7 yrs or so? Did a DH race on me a few weeks ago in more mud than most would care to see in an entire season. No problems all day. Are you basing this on 15 yr old 737s?

    A lot of people like the adjustable tension feature, but I have yet to meet anyone who actually adjusts their pedals after finding a medium-ish setting that works.
    Yes, that's kinda the point, to be able to set it where it works for you. Right now with my injured right foot I'm backing it off, which is nice.

    All other pedals that I can think of are designed with proper tension from the factory
    Which would make sense if all people were designed the same.

    Lastly, and most importantly to me is float. For my knees, having some float is absolutely necessary
    Double edged sword, more float is more distance till you reach the engagement point with time/cb type mechanisms, making it harder to get out. On my last ride a guy with mallets kept falling over at slow speed due to inability to unclip. It's got its advantages and disadvantages.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    945
    I have used most of the peal systems since the first Shimano's. I had been using Shimano until a few years ago and started using CB candies. For me the CB's had a more consistent release in mud and fine grit [dry ] found in the desert. They have more float which can be good or bad. Recently had a knee operation and found I wasn't clipping out consistently so went back to my Shimano's [ less heel movement ]. The downside is un-wanted release's when off camber with the bike. I asked two Pro [ expert ] riders at my local shop what they ride, one use Shimano and one uses CB. They both ride some very extreme trails in our area. The point both systems have their followers so try them both.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charging_rhinos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,841
    Ahh yes. There you are Jayem!! I was wondering if you might hop in and go after me as you did in another SPD vs Everything Else thread. You don't disappoint. Not pissed at you or anything, btw. Just amused at how upset people with SPDs get when anyone speaks ill of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    What, the mud clearing design where it just pushes through that shimano has used for the last 7 yrs or so? ... Are you basing this on 15 yr old 737s?
    Nope. I'm basing it off of three of my closest riding buddies who use SPDs. One has 2 year old XTRs, another XTs from 2-3 years ago (780s?), and another with last year's XTs with the cage/platform around them. It happened three times last year and twice this year that Utah got muddy and the gravelly clay proved to be a major problem for both of them. I very much dislike waiting on the side of the trail for them to find a stick or something to clear out all the crap from their cleats and pedals. With my Mallets, I push the cleat into the pedal, wiggle just a tad, and it has cleared everything I've ever stepped in with ease. Never failed once.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    On my last ride a guy with mallets kept falling over at slow speed due to inability to unclip. It's got its advantages and disadvantages.
    Of course it's got its drawbacks. In my case, I feel the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages, that's all. And it sounds like your friend with the mallets is either very new to clipless and needs to practice a bit more, or look at his choice in shoes. Might be interfering with his ability to get out. It took me all of about 3 rides to feel 100% comfortable with Mallets.

    Now, as it seems though Club SPD has shown up in force, ready to shoot down anyone else's opinions, I'll bow out and let you have this so you don't feel the need to get so upset. If you need help clearing out your cleats any time soon, I'll be the guy riding by.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
    rck18: All of them, because they're meat.

  46. #46
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,686
    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    Nope. I'm basing it off of three of my closest riding buddies who use SPDs.
    All, well I've actually ridden the crank brothers and shimanos, including many versions of each, old and new.

    Of course it's got its drawbacks. In my case, I feel the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages, that's all. And it sounds like your friend with the mallets is either very new to clipless and needs to practice a bit more, or look at his choice in shoes. Might be interfering with his ability to get out. It took me all of about 3 rides to feel 100% comfortable with Mallets.
    Mentioned that already to him. He said he was running the shim, but I let him know it's a "known issue" that some shoes interfere with the CB pedals and that some trimming or additional shimming may be necessary. Still, low speed falls because you can't get out suck more than just about anything IMO. I've had a few with the CB pedals because as hard as you yank, you can't get them to release due to the angular deflection required, so if your foot can't make it how-many-ever degrees because you're trying to pull out by rotating your foot inward, you can be screwed and unable to pull out. It's much more rare to have to release in this direction, but it still happens IME, especially during slow-speed stuff. Again, rare, but frequent enough the injury isn't worth it to me. Due to shimano relying more on spring tension, especially with the multi-release cleats, you will be able to let go if you yank up hard enough, rather than "only twisting" the ankle/foot. For me, this is huge. I find it tends to "kick me out" of the pedals more reliably in any time of fall/dabbing situation.

    The other big part is when looking at DH type pedals (like the mallet) I find that in more extreme situations like starting on any super rough trail, it's more difficult to get into them, as you sorta have to "roll" your foot forward to engage the mech. Sometimes when the eggbeater mech in the mallet is positioned just wrong, your cleat hits the top of the eggbeater cage (which is essentially 45 degrees out of place) and simply shoots forward off the pedal. Although now being passed up for lighter weight and more minimal designs, the 30-degree floating M545 and 647 designs are far better for serious DH/aggressive riding based on my experience. Much easier to clip in given the variance of terrain and situations, with the nod obviously going to the 647 for the more modern mechanism design.

    Now, as it seems though Club SPD has shown up in force, ready to shoot down anyone else's opinions, I'll bow out and let you have this so you don't feel the need to get so upset. If you need help clearing out your cleats any time soon, I'll be the guy riding by.
    Cool. I find CB products to usually be woefully under-designed, obviously based on my experience, but also reinforced with the droves of people upset by their first gen hubs, cranks, dropper-posts, pedals, pumps, etc. They usually have design/feature that "hooks" you into buying the product, but they usually have some fairly serious flaws that make them fail or fail to function. Some people can't resist the light weight and will sacrifice nearly everything for it. The only true advantage of these IMO is the mud function, it's decent. It's not worth the reliability issues or other limitations/non-adjustability IMO, but if you were more orientated towards disposable parts and ok with replacing stuff more frequently, it could be worth it to outfit a race-bike with eggbeaters. Otherwise, as is usually said, Time makes similar pedals that are actually reliable and worthy of putting on a ride. They do have the float benefits without many of the other limits and design pitfalls of the crank brothers. At that point, it's personal preference of course. I prefer the fact that the shimano stuff releases more based on the spring tension and not quite so locked into "x" amount of rotation, that they are adjustable for tension, that they are more reliable for entry and exit (no super-fast wearing cleats to cause your knee to impact the handlebar), and so on. If shimano took a back seat and never updated their designs to include the newer mud-clearing design, trimming the mech and chassis down to keep the weight competative and introducing new pedals like the "trail" series and 647s, then I'd probably have moved on too, time Z pedals and ATACs have a great reputation and are definitely good choices as well.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

Similar Threads

  1. Clipless Pedals with Non-Clipless Shoes?
    By SeaHorse in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-04-2014, 07:37 PM
  2. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-07-2013, 06:10 AM
  3. Platform vs clipless vs platform/clipless hybrid?
    By Chad A in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 06-08-2012, 09:04 PM
  4. Trying to clipless again...
    By NHmtnbke in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-04-2011, 06:42 PM
  5. Clipless?
    By demonlarry in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 07-07-2011, 01:09 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.