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  1. #1
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    Mechanical droppers

    Just starting to think about and research dropper seatposts and I'm wondering if there are any reliable inexpensive ones worth considering?

  2. #2
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    Reliable. Gravity dropper. Dead simple and it works. Ugly.

  3. #3
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    Depends on your version of inexpensive.

    I got by with a $100 dropper (gravity clone) but I had to modify the locking mechanism (shim the pin) to make it work properly. Not sure on long time reliability though.

    The most reliable droppers are gravity.

    The rest have been great for some and headaches for others.

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  4. #4
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    Ya know that old saying: You can only pick two - fast, cheap, or good? Well for droppers you don't have these options. The ebay $70 one is ok, but will break in a month or so (unless you get lucky). Otherwise you are out a couple hundo. Gravity posts are supposed to be EXTREMELY reliable but they ain't cheap and they don't look great.
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  5. #5
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    I don't have much seatpost exposed to start ( 4 inches ) with but I assume the main reason for the dropper is to lower the seat so you can get your butt back further on the bike to safely descend?

    This will probably be expensive since I will have a shop install it since I would not feel confident messing with it myself.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I assume the main reason for the dropper is to lower the seat so you can get your butt back further on the bike to safely descend?
    This is a common misconception. The real reason is somewhat more altruistic. Should you meet a tired dwarf far from civilisation, the dropper post will allow you to let him ride your bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    This is a common misconception. The real reason is somewhat more altruistic. Should you meet a tired dwarf far from civilisation, the dropper post will allow you to let him ride your bike.
    In that case, I should have gone down a few frame sizes!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    In that case, I should have gone down a few frame sizes!
    Now you're just being silly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    This is a common misconception. The real reason is somewhat more altruistic. Should you meet a tired dwarf far from civilisation, the dropper post will allow you to let him ride your bike.
    Stop giving away industry secrets.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I don't have much seatpost exposed to start ( 4 inches ) with but I assume the main reason for the dropper is to lower the seat so you can get your butt back further on the bike to safely descend?

    This will probably be expensive since I will have a shop install it since I would not feel confident messing with it myself.
    I actually just ordered a PNW Cascade this morning, my first dropper. Besides allowing you to get your butt back further, it allows you to lower your center of gravity, just moving down. So when riding in the attack position, besides side to side and forward and back, you can also move up and down.

    The Cascade is externally routed, which is what my bike needs, and is supposed to be very easy to install. PNW does have some internal routed posts as well. And PNW20 will get you a discount on their website.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
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  11. #11
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    I think droppers should be renamed anti-buckaroo posts.

  12. #12
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    X-Fusion Manic - $200. Pretty new, so there aren't a lot of reviews yet, but initial impressions seem positive.

    I was all set to get one, but then I got a new bike instead.
    The cake is a lie.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I don't have much seatpost exposed to start ( 4 inches ) with but I assume the main reason for the dropper is to lower the seat so you can get your butt back further on the bike to safely descend?

    This will probably be expensive since I will have a shop install it since I would not feel confident messing with it myself.
    not sure if you're serious, but, you don't need a dropper to lower your saddle, you can do that manually with a quick-release seatpost clamp. A dropper allows you to remotely lower your saddle without stopping and/or dismounting, so you don't have to compromise by either descending at full height or pedaling with the saddle too low.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    not sure if you're serious, but, you don't need a dropper to lower your saddle, you can do that manually with a quick-release seatpost clamp. A dropper allows you to remotely lower your saddle without stopping and/or dismounting, so you don't have to compromise by either descending at full height or pedaling with the saddle too low.
    I realize that but was thinking when I'm on single track that has the short steep dhill cent sections, the dropper might help me to safely get through that sthe section.

    If I were younger and more skilled ( and daring ) I am sure the dropper would be a frivolous option.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I actually just ordered a PNW Cascade this morning, my first dropper. Besides allowing you to get your butt back further, it allows you to lower your center of gravity, just moving down. So when riding in the attack position, besides side to side and forward and back, you can also move up and down.

    The Cascade is externally routed, which is what my bike needs, and is supposed to be very easy to install. PNW does have some internal routed posts as well. And PNW20 will get you a discount on their website.

    Thanks, I will take a look at that model and I'm guessing my bike needs to be externally routed as well. It's a Trek Superfly 100!AL Elite and do think the cable could run internally without drilling and don't think that is a viable option?

  16. #16
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    I don't have one, but thinking about it. I've been looking at the KS Eten @ Jensons. Mixed reviews, but mostly positive.

    KS Eten Remote Seatpost > Components > Seatposts > Dropper Posts | Jenson USA
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I don't have one, but thinking about it. I've been looking at the KS Eten @ Jensons. Mixed reviews, but mostly positive.

    KS Eten Remote Seatpost > Components > Seatposts > Dropper Posts | Jenson USA
    I like it and will keep it in mind but wish the remote cable was located midway on the post instead of the top just to keep the cable stationary and close to the bikes frame.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I realize that but was thinking when I'm on single track that has the short steep dhill cent sections, the dropper might help me to safely get through that sthe section.

    If I were younger and more skilled ( and daring ) I am sure the dropper would be a frivolous option.
    Yes, a dropper is ideal for trails with rolling steep sections.

    For external remote routing, check out the KS Lev, since the remote cable connects to the collar at the seatpost clamp, you don't have to deal with the cable looping when the saddle is dropped:
    KS Lev-Dx Seatpost 100mm > Components > Seatposts > Dropper Posts | Jenson USA

  19. #19
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    ^ The Cascade also connects at the collar.

    rickcin, dropper posts aren't just for the unskilled, lots of highly skilled riders use them

    jcd, is your Heckler also external? I have no experience but with them yet but you may want to check out the Cascade or the PNW Rainer. The Rainer is cheaper but the cable does not mount at the collar. Both of these are 125 travel. That code I put in above is worth 20% off and they only charged my $6.50 for shipping. I had a problem on their website, it was saying they were out of the size I needed and I didn't want to miss out on the discount so I emailed them and the president of the company got back to me right away saying it was an inventory glitch and it was fixed and they do have them in stock (granted, they are a very small company).
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    ^ The Cascade also connects at the collar.

    rickcin, dropper posts aren't just for the unskilled, lots of highly skilled riders use them

    jcd, is your Heckler also external? I have no experience but with them yet but you may want to check out the Cascade or the PNW Rainer. The Rainer is cheaper but the cable does not mount at the collar. Both of these are 125 travel. That code I put in above is worth 20% off and they only charged my $6.50 for shipping. I had a problem on their website, it was saying they were out of the size I needed and I didn't want to miss out on the discount so I emailed them and the president of the company got back to me right away saying it was an inventory glitch and it was fixed and they do have them in stock (granted, they are a very small company).
    Yes sir, external. Thanks, I will check them out for sure!
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  21. #21
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    Definitely like the Cascade and the KS droppers with the cable at the seatpost clamp area, that would be my preference.

    I have two issues I'm not understanding;

    How is the normal saddle height predetermined? I assume you set this up so that it automatically fully extends to your preferred riding height, somehow?

    And, with the external cable routing, what accessories/straps are used to neatly attach the cable to the frame of the bike. Anal about how my bike looks!

  22. #22
    Yeet so hard
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    Woah woah woah... We need to slow down.

    Droppers come in different 'drop lengths'. Typically 100, 125, 150, 175mm. On the vast majority, this number can not be changed. They also (mostly) have a collar where the upper stantion slides into the lower. This will maybe be 15mm. So we are looking at AT LEAST 115mm (4 inches = 101.6mm) of seatpost extended from your frame.

    Does your frame have internal or external routing? If external, that may add another 10-15mm of height that you must have extended.

    If you have only 4 inches of seatpost extended, you need to do a bunch of measuring before you buy anything!
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Definitely like the Cascade and the KS droppers with the cable at the seatpost clamp area, that would be my preference.

    I have two issues I'm not understanding;

    How is the normal saddle height predetermined? I assume you set this up so that it automatically fully extends to your preferred riding height, somehow?

    And, with the external cable routing, what accessories/straps are used to neatly attach the cable to the frame of the bike. Anal about how my bike looks!
    A dropper post has a static position at fully extended. You install the post like a regular post and set it at your optimum seat height. It drops from there and always returns to it's original position. Too easy.

    Most modern bikes either have routing for an externally routed dropper or cone set up for an internal dropper. Buy the one that compliments what your bike was designed for.

    If your bike is older and you have to install an externally routed dropper, it's up to your own creativity how you route the cable. Black or other colored electrical tape works well or zip ties. If you use zip ties, make sure you use fingernail clippers to trim them so they don't end up having sharp edges.

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  24. #24
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    ^ Good point. But maybe he has compromised it a bit lower than the ideal height (?) but it does sound close. If nor sure, might not be a bad idea to enlist the help of the LBS.

    I'm a bit worried I might have issues, I measured but I can't quite wrap my head around the numbers and I'm not 100% sure how far down my seat tube goes before the bend would block it. I do currently have my seat a little low. 95% sure I'll be fine. I'll report back once I get it installed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Definitely like the Cascade and the KS droppers with the cable at the seatpost clamp area, that would be my preference.

    I have two issues I'm not understanding;

    How is the normal saddle height predetermined? I assume you set this up so that it automatically fully extends to your preferred riding height, somehow?

    And, with the external cable routing, what accessories/straps are used to neatly attach the cable to the frame of the bike. Anal about how my bike looks!
    I have the LEV and enjoy the collar mount, when cables are mounted external it is big help not having the cable moving and rubbing the paint. I use simple zip ties to secure the cable to the seat tube, and there are threaded mounting points on my down tube to hold it with the little plastic clamps, ask your LBS.
    About the benefits, yes getting the saddle out of the way is what it does, but how that changes your riding is what it's about! Any rough descents you feel more confident, on drops a dropper makes hucking them so easy and fun. On level twisty singletrack the bike will amaze you how it will flip side-to-side so you are going much faster through the curves. After a few months I was using 1 and 2 cogs smaller in turns I thought I had wired years ago. One big benefit is climbing, most of us have the saddle a little low as compromise between pedaling efficiency and being able to move the bike under us. Now you can have a high/perfect saddle for the long grinds and climbs.
    oops I wasn't clipped in

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    ^ The Cascade also connects at the collar.

    rickcin, dropper posts aren't just for the unskilled, lots of highly skilled riders use them

    jcd, is your Heckler also external? I have no experience but with them yet but you may want to check out the Cascade or the PNW Rainer. The Rainer is cheaper but the cable does not mount at the collar. Both of these are 125 travel. That code I put in above is worth 20% off and they only charged my $6.50 for shipping. I had a problem on their website, it was saying they were out of the size I needed and I didn't want to miss out on the discount so I emailed them and the president of the company got back to me right away saying it was an inventory glitch and it was fixed and they do have them in stock (granted, they are a very small company).
    I just went through the site and checked both the Cascade and the Raineir, my bike specs shows 375mm, the Cascade is 406nn and the Raineir is 425mm, does that mean I'm SOL?

    (sorry for the Hijack lol)
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I just went through the site and checked both the Cascade and the Raineir, my bike specs shows 375mm, the Cascade is 406nn and the Raineir is 425mm, does that mean I'm SOL?

    (sorry for the Hijack lol)
    Mine is also listed as 375 but that is just the total length of the stock seat post. As long as you have additional room down the seattube for the dropper to extend down, I think you are ok. I'll let you know once I get it and mount it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Mine is also listed as 375 but that is just the total length of the stock seat post. As long as you have additional room down the seattube for the dropper to extend down, I think you are ok. I'll let you know once I get it and mount it.
    Ahh ok sweet, thanks Chaz!
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