Landing technique- Mtbr.com

View Poll Results: When landing gap jumps what do you consider proper technique?

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  • Landing front wheel heavy

    0 0%
  • Landing front wheel first, slightly before rear wheel

    21 48.84%
  • Landing both wheels together

    19 44.19%
  • Landing rear wheel first and front wheel second

    3 6.98%
  • Landing rear wheel heavy

    0 0%
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    A waste of time it is is
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    Landing technique

    I am currently doing the warranty dance with a company that I will not yet name as the dance is ongoing. One of the reasons they have denied the claim comes down to landing technique on a gap jump. What they have described as "proper landing technique" is not what I would consider normal or preferred so this has me wondering what you consider normal or proper landing technique.

    Thanks for your input

    Edit: 150mm dual suspension bike if that makes a difference

  2. #2
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
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    This thread sounds like a landing mine to me.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    This thread sounds like a landing mine to me.
    Possibly, but please vote

  4. #4
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    Definitely landing front wheel first, slightly before rear wheel. The front fork is at a better angle and it will absorb most of the impact and is better setup to absorb that impact.
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  5. #5
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    Anything that's reasonably smooth and in control. Front wheel first is the ideal but shit happens and I think every rider wants their bike and components to be able to withstand less than ideal landings.

    Can't wait to hear what company won't stand by their product because the wrong wheel landed first.

  6. #6
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    Surprised the first two responses say front wheel first. I for sure would say both wheels same time. But I also watch a lot of Danny MacAskill videos where they are riding rigid trials bikes and every time they drop to flat they land heavily on the rear wheel first.

    I don't mind landing a little front heavy on small jumps but I can't remember a scenario where I intentionally wanted to land front wheel first on a bigger hit.

    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post
    Can't wait to hear what company won't stand by their product because the wrong wheel landed first.
    ^This.
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  7. #7
    A waste of time it is is
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    This has already been viewed way more than votes cast, please vote. Honest opinions on the info you have at hand, if you need more than let me know

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Surprised the first two responses say front wheel first. I for sure would say both wheels same time. But I also watch a lot of Danny MacAskill videos where they are riding rigid trials bikes and every time they drop to flat they land heavily on the rear wheel first.

    I don't mind landing a little front heavy on small jumps but I can't remember a scenario where I intentionally wanted to land front wheel first on a bigger hit.
    Yeah when I was riding rigid I'd intentionally land rear wheel first and absorb a lot of the impact with my legs as my front wheel came down.

    Now on an FS landing front wheel just before the rear feels especially smooth to me...unless it's huck to flat in which case yeah I prefer both wheels at the same time.

  9. #9
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    Generally I like both wheels to hit at the same time, but depending on the shape of the landing my speed, where I'm trying to go after I land, how much speed I'm trying to keep, or dump, and how far off the ground I am, I will sometimes land rear wheel first and sometimes land front wheel first, but %80 of the time I'm shooting for both at the same time, so thats the vote I'll cast.

  10. #10
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    Depends on the jump and landing, if I'm scrubbing, etc. As far as the bike breaking... shouldn't matter. Wouldn't trust a bike from a company who says their bike couldn't handle any of those options.

  11. #11
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    Simon from Fluid Ride says that rather than trying to land both wheels at the same *time,* itís ideal to land both wheels in the same *place.*

    This means front wheel should land slightly before rear wheel.

    But Iím old and perfecting this technique (when for years Iíve been trying to land both wheels at the same time) would mean revising a skill that might put me in danger. Not going there. So Iíll vote both wheels at the same time.

    But note: landing both wheels at the same time is not what the expert(s) say(s). Itís just what *Iím* going to do. The correct answer is front wheel slightly before rear wheel.
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  12. #12
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    Too many factors and it likely doesn't matter much if it's not overt either way. The most dangerous I've experienced is when landing way nose-forward, having over-rotated and all your weight lands on the fork. But really, either can be bad if it gets extreme enough. On some stuff, like slower speed drops and especially when they are sudden, you have to push the front end out and sometimes you don't get the bike to land level, it lands nose first, but it's decent enough that you have control.
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  13. #13
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    Pushing the front down first can be a huge help righting the ship when getting out of shape on a whip etc.

    Seems there could be a case made for various methods depending on the circumstances though.

  14. #14
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    This is so dependant on what you're doing - a lot of flow trails have "rollers" that can be "doubled" that are actually too short to land the whole bike on, then you want front wheel first, unless you're landing into a manual...but look, a big hit? At speed? Both wheels at the same time. Let all the suspension work to soak up the forces of the landing rather than focusing it on any one part of the bike. That's what I've always been told is how my fat @$$ should be landing so as not to break bikes.

  15. #15
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    I try to land both wheels at the same time but front first is a little smoother especially on flow trails. If it's a drop to flat landing I land rear first because you can get more "travel" out of your legs and kind of use the bike to give you more room for absorbing the landing.

    I can see landing rear first and slapping the front tire into the ground all the time would put a lot of stress around the head tube. The frame should probably be made to handle that.

  16. #16
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    What do they consider 'proper landing technique'?

    I'm surprised that any manufacturer would warranty a frame if damaged doing a gap jump. I'd think they'd not consider this 'normal use'.

    Landing both wheels at same time on same surface. This is how you plant the landing on a DJ bike. And many of those have front rigid forks, so doing so takes advantage of the physics of landing this way. You spread out the force of impact landing this way.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy G. Parrish View Post
    What do they consider 'proper landing technique'?

    I'm surprised that any manufacturer would warranty a frame if damaged doing a gap jump. I'd think they'd not consider this 'normal use'.
    Why? I do little gap jumps on my XC bike all the time. Bigger gap jumps on my enduro bike. That's literally what my enduro bike was built for.

    Now, casing a gap jump, you'd have a point. But just doing a gap jump? There's nothing different with a gap jump than a tabletop or a double.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  18. #18
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    After coming back from a ride (one of the trails was featured in the Friday Fails!), definitely both at the same time, no question to me as far as optimal. Obviously trails are not always optimal, so sometimes it's either slightly first, but best for me is both at the same time.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  19. #19
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    I go for both wheels at the same time but it does not always work out that way.

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  20. #20
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    Are you calling a double a gap jump? Or essentially a double but over a natural feature where you're landing on the slope of the back side? Just curious ...

    If you're landing on the back side on a slope then I would say at the same time or front wheel slightly first. Ideally it should be so smooth that it doesn't matter and there is no worry about breaking a frame.

    If you are landing to flat, or casing the jump, or a landing that is violent where there's the potential to break something I would say back wheel first which allows your body and legs to absorb some of the impact followed by front wheel landing and arms doing the same. If it's a hard or violent impact I wouldn't want to land front wheel first or at the same time, though I'm not riding 150mm enduro bikes and don't know what their suspension can handle.

    But unless they watched you land on one particular jump I don't see how they can say you used bad technique as there are many variables and not one correct answer. And unless that one jump is all you ever ride I don't think jump technique really matters as the frame was not likely perfectly fine and after the jump it wasn't and was broken. It likely was damaged months ago and repeated use got it to the point where that jump was enough stress and strain to cause the failure. Unless it was a very violent landing and only you know that.

    You should tell them that you got confused and that was your last bike and this time you were heading to your friend's house and you were just riding along and heard this weird noise all of the sudden...

  21. #21
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    As a general rule, ideal is front slightly before rear. This is not always possible or safe. To suggest that landing technique should affect a warranty claim, however, is absurd. No rider is perfect and every rider screws up a landing from time to time. Most bike frames are built to withstand such abuse, and most frames will eventually break if subjected to too much of that abuse.

    From a business perspective, it makes little sense to deny a claim over these kinds of details. How much do companies spend on marketing and trying to develop a reputation? Are you going to flush that hard-won reputation down the toilet over a frame that probably cost under 1k to manufacture?

    Take Santa Cruz for example. They honor all kinds of warranty claims even when it's clearly crash damage. Result? They have one of the best reputations of any bike manufacturer and get a premium for their bikes because of it.
    Last edited by kpdemello; 2 Days Ago at 09:26 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by emu26 View Post
    This has already been viewed way more than votes cast, please vote...
    That's because there's no one right or wrong answer. Just like your other poll (What size gap). Every trail, every gap is different. And, in my opinion, I think you should be asking about drop, not gap. There can be significant gaps with relatively little drop that result in smooth soft landings, and vice versa. I've seen 8+ foot gaps on a descending runs that hardly compress suspension, and short 3 foot gaps that bottom out suspension because of the amount of drop. What wheel I land with first depends on these variables. Same with how much of a gap I feel my bike (or me) can handle. At least that's how I think about gap versus drop.
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  23. #23
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    A lot depends on the actual jump layout. When I read 'gap jump', I'm picturing a DJ style jump with a very steep take off and landing. This requires a different style than a low-angle, high-speed sender to a long, relatively flat transition.

    Got a picture of the actual jump in question?
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