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  1. #101
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    ^^^I find that I can have a significantly higher seat with clips than platforms. I mean, I still prefer it lower when descending technical terrain, but it doesnít have to be as low.

    I feel like the main adaptation one must make when riding flats is to keep your center of gravity lower and in more of a crouched, athletic stance. That way, no matter what you encounter on the trail, your arms and legs can maintain that connection to the pedals. Thatís hard to accomplish when your seat is in the way, and riding with your hips behind the saddle because itís too high is poor form.

    Clipped in, the seat can be higher because even if your body doesnít absorb a hit fully, and the seat bottoms out on your crotch, the pedals and bike are still going to come with your feet.

  2. #102
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    I've noticed I need to change my seat height on the road bike depending n which shoes I wear. Obviously one of my clipless shoes is taller than the other.

    This has noting to do with flats, I am a flat rider on MTB whole-heatedly.

    But to answer the question about seat height, I think it has more to do with the shoe and pedal height than it does with just clipless vs. flat.

  3. #103
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    Several months have passed and I guess I can now firmly say I'm a flat pedal rider, if such thing exists.

    To make long story short:

    Climbing:

    I know it sounds weird, but I really prefer to power up climbs on flats Vs on clips. Stepping and pushing on the large platform feels more natural, more like a squat.

    I can also keep climbing for longer periods and stay fresh and comfortable. This is likely related to the fact that with clipless pedals I end up doing movements and efforts I'm not supposed to, resulting in knee, ankle and lower back pain.

    Some argue about the efficiency of clipless, but if you look into the actual studies you'll know this is a tricky area. Ok, it's clear a stand up power sprint over a rock garden will be better clipped in, but in normal pedaling conditions this is not so obvious. You can also "round" your pedal stroke with a sort of scraping motion, which I use not for extra power but to smooth the torque delivery on low traction climbs


    Downhill:
    There are two specific situations where I feel better with clipless.
    One is high speed rock gardens and such. I'm way better now than I was when started the thread, much more relaxed and less stressed about weighting my feet. However I'm still a little faster charging through the really rough stuff clipped in. This is not such a bad thing, as it keeps me realistic about my skills and makes me stay within my capabilities envelope. But I'm getting better at it.

    The other situation is when I do a high speed first run of certain trails with lots of surprise 3 or 4' drops. When you get out of flow with the trail you end up not doing the proper stance and preload before getting air it's easy to feel the bike getting away from you.
    Also getting better at it by the week.

    Every where else I prefer to descend on flats. I'm way more relaxed, no surprise unclips, easy to bail and try new stuff every ride. If I was a pro I'd be much more competent and confident to commit as much with clipless as with flats, so I'd be mostly certainly clipped in. But I'm no Pro, and end up being faster and more commited on flats.


    About seat height, I'm about 15mm lower with Nukeproof Horizons SH and GR7s than with Saint SPDs and AM7 shoes

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ze_Zaskar View Post
    Climbing:

    I know it sounds weird, but I really prefer to power up climbs on flats Vs on clips. Stepping and pushing on the large platform feels more natural, more like a squat.
    Should try an oval chainring. I just switched both of my bikes over to oval rings and really liking the way the oval smooths out the power on climbs. I am finding my self in a high gear climbing and climbing in same gear seems easier. Large flats and a oval chainring are a nice match for climbing.

  5. #105
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    Actually I'm already using an oval chainring, might be a reason why I enjoy climbing

  6. #106
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    I rode flats tonight. 500m of vertical descent in gnarly as natural mountain trail.
    Sunday i rode clips round the local bike park
    Saturday was flats up the mountain again.
    Last Tuesday, clips in the bike park again,

    Ahhh. Both pedal types suited the riding I was doing.

    I guess i'm just a pedal slut that swings both ways.

  7. #107
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    I've been on flat pedals for a few months now since I'm concentrating on improving my cornering (especially flat and loose-over-hard). As my speeds increase and I try new techniques, it's been really helpful. One thing I've noticed is I do like how SPDs just snap me into my "ideal" spot when I put my foot down, whereas sometimes on flat pedals, I need to make adjustments mid-pedalling.

    Has anyone here tried the crank bros mallet e pedals? From what I'm reading, these seem like they could be a best of both worlds pedal. Good amount of float, clips aren't as tight so making a dab is easier, also have a decent amount of control even when the cleat isn't engaged yet. Thoughts?

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonp22 View Post
    I've been on flat pedals for a few months now since I'm concentrating on improving my cornering (especially flat and loose-over-hard). As my speeds increase and I try new techniques, it's been really helpful. One thing I've noticed is I do like how SPDs just snap me into my "ideal" spot when I put my foot down, whereas sometimes on flat pedals, I need to make adjustments mid-pedalling.

    Has anyone here tried the crank bros mallet e pedals? From what I'm reading, these seem like they could be a best of both worlds pedal. Good amount of float, clips aren't as tight so making a dab is easier, also have a decent amount of control even when the cleat isn't engaged yet. Thoughts?
    I've always experienced the same thing. Clips are easier to post a foot in the corners and get back to the perfect position. I never ran the E mallets but ran mallets dating back to the first models in the early 2000's. Personally I don't recommend any of the mallets because the clip mechanism is more prone to releasing when you don't want. I would go with one of the other platform clips. I always liked Time, and shimano, though I will give the nod to mallets when talking about platform feel which still falls woefully short of flats.

  9. #109
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    Tmac pedals has a really good platform. Well worth the weight. Interested to try the Anvl3 tilts as well which is quite a bit cheaper. Platform feel gives you a bit more confidence as well.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonp22 View Post
    Has anyone here tried the crank bros mallet e pedals? From what I'm reading, these seem like they could be a best of both worlds pedal. Good amount of float, clips aren't as tight so making a dab is easier, also have a decent amount of control even when the cleat isn't engaged yet. Thoughts?
    I've run the Mallets (non E) before...and what I don't like are the pins. One of the things I like about clip in pedals is the float. With the pins...the sole of my shoes keep catching...and I get reduced amounts float. I turned my pins all the way in. I use the XT trail now. What I've found is that if you use a shoe with a fairly stiff sole...the "platform" of the pedal won't matter as much since the shoes will be supporting your foot.

  11. #111
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    One thing I never see mentioned, which happens to be one of te few things I dislike about flats, is their durability.
    I was spoiled by years of Shimano SPD (M540) usage, no matter how hard I smacked them (lots of granite here) they stayed together as did feet retention. Flats seem to be more fragile in that regard. Today I had to redo a couple of pins for the third time in 4 months or so on my Nukeproof Horizons. Also two of the grub screw holes were completely striped and I don't plan to helicoil them or recut bigger threads. Never had the need to touch my M540s except for an annual bearing adjustment.

    I'm curious about the new Shimano Saint M828 flat pedals. Shimano bearings and seals and the pins, while not being bolt through, have huge threads

  12. #112
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    Please help me identify these pedals? Thank you!

    Hello, is it possible for you to help identify these pedals? They worked wonderful for 10 years till I broke one yesterday
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails I love flat pedals, but....-img_9368.jpg  

    I love flat pedals, but....-img_9369.jpg  


  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackpanther310 View Post
    Hello, is it possible for you to help identify these pedals? They worked wonderful for 10 years till I broke one yesterday
    Hard to say, but Wellgo makes pedals that look a lot like that. Consider getting some with reusable pins so you can replace the pins when they get rounded.

  14. #114
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    Finding that exact pedal will probably be a tall order.

    If you are looking for an inexpensive flat pedal with good grip, check out the One Up Components Composite pedals. Hard to beat for $50. I have tried the Deity Compounds, Chromag Synth, Raceface Chesters, and One Ups. As far as $50 pedals go, the One Ups have been my favorite with the Chesters a distant second. The One Ups have bigger platform and taller pins. They grip really well.

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