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  1. #1
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    Hello to you all! I have chosen the wrong size bike I think!!

    I am 179cm with an inseam of 85.5 so I fall into the L category just. I bought a Cannondale Scalpel team M and being very much close in between, I listened to too many people and also having ridden an M BMC FS02 I have decided to go for the M anyway. The Cannondale dealer here in Mauritius has not been very helpful. The bike is a different one than the BMC and there is an adapting time to it but I would like to know if I should really go for the L as I haven't ridden it much and try get Cannondale exchange the frame. Anyone could give me some advice based on epxerience or expertise?

  2. #2
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    If the dealer has bikes (not just THAT bike, but really, maybe any C-dale) in stock, go sit on a medium and go sit on a large. The dealer should be able to see one looks like a better fit, and you should be able to feel it. No one here can tell you if your bike is too small unless you post a picture (or series of pictures) of you slowly riding it so they can see how it fits.

  3. #3
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    Go back to the store with your bike and tell them you think itís too small. They should exchange if they sold you the wrong size. On the other hand, if you went against their advice, iíd say that is on you.

    What stem length is on the bike? Is the seatpost zero offset, offset? If you need a too long stem, that might imply the is small. But if the bike has a zero offset, it will be longer than if it is setback.

  4. #4
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    im 5'11", i would of got the L. those reach numbers arent very big

  5. #5
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    It would be extremely generous for cannondale or the bike shop to exchange the bike. That's just generally not something that happens unless the shop specifically offers some sort of fit guarantee (also uncommon, but not unheard of).

    Usually, buying the wrong size bike means you take the loss selling it second hand.
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  6. #6
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    Smack dab perfect fit for a large, i think.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cotharyus View Post
    If the dealer has bikes (not just THAT bike, but really, maybe any C-dale) in stock, go sit on a medium and go sit on a large. The dealer should be able to see one looks like a better fit, and you should be able to feel it. No one here can tell you if your bike is too small unless you post a picture (or series of pictures) of you slowly riding it so they can see how it fits.
    I'm terrible at sizing bikes that way; i always pick something too small. Feels great hopping around the parking lot, then i get on the trail and... oh no, not right at all. I always set the saddle on my road bike too low doing the same thing.



    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Go back to the store with your bike and tell them you think itís too small. They should exchange if they sold you the wrong size. On the other hand, if you went against their advice, iíd say that is on you.

    What stem length is on the bike? Is the seatpost zero offset, offset? If you need a too long stem, that might imply the is small. But if the bike has a zero offset, it will be longer than if it is setback.
    They're under no obligation to exchange a used bike for a new one, but a good shop will work with him. He should be nice, appeal to sympathy, and try to find something that works for all parties. I wouldn't consider a restocking fee unreasonable. Dorking up the handling to try to make it work is a fool's errand, i think.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    I'm terrible at sizing bikes that way; i always pick something too small. Feels great hopping around the parking lot, then i get on the trail and... oh no, not right at all.

    I think that's partly why it's not uncommon for new riders to end up on bikes that are too small. It's nice and easy to maneuver around the parking lot. In the parking lot, the larger size just feels like more bike to handle with no discernible benefit. A lot of people fear getting a bike too big but don't have the same concern for ending up with a bike that's too small. That and new riders have no idea what effect fit has on mtb riding.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    Smack dab perfect fit for a large, i think.



    I'm terrible at sizing bikes that way; i always pick something too small. Feels great hopping around the parking lot, then i get on the trail and... oh no, not right at all. I always set the saddle on my road bike too low doing the same thing.





    They're under no obligation to exchange a used bike for a new one, but a good shop will work with him. He should be nice, appeal to sympathy, and try to find something that works for all parties. I wouldn't consider a restocking fee unreasonable. Dorking up the handling to try to make it work is a fool's errand, i think.
    I kind of think the shop's obligation depends on the situation. But if they recommend a large, and the OP insisted on a medium, then it's on the buyer. It's not an inexpensive, or even a 'normal' high priced bike. Unless I'm misunderstanding something. It's the price of a decent used car.

    This is the only Scalpel listed as 'team' on the Cannondale site. Though it's the 2108.

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined

    That is not a beginner's bike. Something is off, here.
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  9. #9
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    Hello to you all! I have chosen the wrong size bike I think!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    I kind of think the shop's obligation depends on the situation. But if they recommend a large, and the OP insisted on a medium, then it's on the buyer. It's not an inexpensive, or even a 'normal' high priced bike. Unless I'm misunderstanding something. It's the price of a decent used car.

    This is the only Scalpel listed as 'team' on the Cannondale site. Though it's the 2108.

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined

    That is not a beginner's bike. Something is off, here.
    It could be the old scalpel 29 or even the soft tail scalpel 26Ē


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow4eva View Post
    It could be the old scalpel 29 or even the soft tail scalpel 26Ē


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, maybe.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    I kind of think the shop's obligation depends on the situation. But if they recommend a large, and the OP insisted on a medium, then it's on the buyer. It's not an inexpensive, or even a 'normal' high priced bike. Unless I'm misunderstanding something. It's the price of a decent used car.

    This is the only Scalpel listed as 'team' on the Cannondale site. Though it's the 2108.

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined

    That is not a beginner's bike. Something is off, here.
    Yeah, we don't know the details.


    When i worked in a shop i'd see something like this not super infrequently; former enthusiast who hadn't ridden in a long time wants a super lightweight suspension bike to re-enter the sport. He'd get a tiny one that was 'better for his back' or 'not too stretched out' or 'handles like his pile of crap from 1993.' Or the little bike felt better in the parking lot. Then he'd slowly realize he made some bad assumptions and keep coming back to us to sort it out. We'd roll with it and try to help him out in a way that wasn't too expensive for us and made him happy. Definitely the people who were humble and pleasant were treated the best- that's human nature. Not saying that's what happened to tias49, but bike shops are familiar with his situation.





    Hello to you all! I have chosen the wrong size bike I think!!-cannondale-bikes-sizing.jpg
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  12. #12
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    I'm 5'11 and always go for a size medium.

    I agree with one pivot. If you already have ridden the bike offroad its yours to keep. Ride and enjoy. If need be slap a slightly longer stem on.

    The world wont end.

  13. #13
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    The old way of thinking is to "always downsize", this comes from back in the day when we had goofy-long 8" headtubes on the "large" size bikes with crazy high top-tubes and other wonky geometry (6" stems, etc). Bikes were kind of designed "only" for a narrow cross-section and outside of that, they were just ill-suited.

    It's not completely invalid to downsize for maneuverability on the downhills, but modern geometry bikes give up very little if they are a bit bigger and unless you are being shuttled all day, you have to consider where you are going to spend 90% of the time on the bike, which is not descending. In that sense, you want to be fairly stretched out and not cramped up, which just makes riding miserable.

    These days, at your and my size (I'm 5' 11") it's large all-day-long. Go to a 35-40mm stem if you have to, but the benefit of the frame size will far surpass any marginal amount of maneuverability lost.

    It used to be you could "make a small bike larger, but not make a large bike smaller". That isn't anywhere near as true and going to super long stems, set-back posts, extreme-length posts and other extremes just results in a poor-handling bike and structural issues. On the other hand putting a short stem on the bike doesn't affect much else negatively.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    These days, at your and my size (I'm 5' 11") it's large all-day-long. Go to a 35-40mm stem if you have to, but the benefit of the frame size will far surpass any marginal amount of maneuverability lost.
    I'm 5'11" and medium all day long for me! For most of my buddies too who are similar size!....

    I guess your riding style and local tracks play a big part. We ride a lot of tight twisty natural mountain tracks around here. Extra WB length is a disavantage!

    I'm rolling a 50mm stem as standard. But currently on a 33mm. Thats makes my bike meven more descent orientated with a sacriface to super steep climbs. I don't car above the climb sacrifice because i'm all about the descent!

  15. #15
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    Try it always

    You should always have the option to demo on a real ride before you buy. Sure for the recreational rider, a lot ride might be indicative of how theyíre going to feel, but for a mountain rider with decent climbs and somewhat agressive downhills even, this doesnít work.
    That said, Iím 6í and rode a medium trance for a long time. I had to get my butt way back on the dh and my seatpost was always wayyyy up on the ascent. I like my large bike much better. Keep in mind, each geometry is going to treat you differently. I usually go for whatís on sale or whatís available from last years model, but Iím definitely not as great as most guys out there, maybe if I could afford to shop around better, Iíd pick something that fit me better. But I love my large t275c. Itís a large and it feels great up hill, down, it rides, but I donít get too crazy anyway, it a fun flowy bike. I rode a lot of demos and some were great in medium, the yeti medium fit nicely but the ibis was too small and the evil insurgent was ok on the down but not as fun up. Just work with the shop guy and let him know youíre paying lots of money.

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